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  • Exchange, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    x W x D 47 x 34 2 x 8 2 cm 18 1 2 x 13 7 16 x 3 1 4 in Gift of Joseph H Hirshhorn to the Smithsonian Institution in 1979 85 19 18 Photograph by Franko Khoury National Museum of African Art Smithsonian Institution For centuries trade has been one of the important ways that Africans have engaged in a dynamic multicultural exchange of ideas goods and values The results of such dialogue are expressed and celebrated through a variety of art forms In Nigeria for example works of ivory and bronze were the prerogative of the Oba or King and often incorporated specific references to the Portuguese sailors with whom they traded Bini peoples regarded the Portuguese traders as denizens of the realm of Olokun god of the sea for they brought wealth to the Kingdom of Benin in the form of weapons ships and fine sumptuary articles An extraordinary seventeenth century Bini plaque from the palace of the Oba is adorned with the heads of Portuguese soldiers in the upper corners identified by long hair drooping mustaches and dome shaped hats The field photo shows a similar scene in the court of the

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/cultural-exchange/exchange/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Artist, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    rural areas most of the objects that fill peoples lives are made locally The substantial skills required to carve weave or sculpt may be a part of basic education the knowledge all members of society are expected to possess All women for example may be expected to produce pots for cooking and storage Particularly accomplished potters may gain reputations making pots for sale to neighbors and at regional markets This

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/everyday-endeavor/artist/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Igbo Ukwu, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    chanced upon several bronze objects including this bowl on a stand It was not until 1959 that the archaeologist Thurstan Shaw excavated this site known as Igbo Ukwu and discovered that it must have been part of a storehouse for ritual objects Shaw 1977 Dated to the 9th or 10th century C E A D Igbo Ukwu represents one of the earliest examples of bronze casting in sub Saharan Africa

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/ancient-africa/igbo-ukwu/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Childhood, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Older children help with the care of younger siblings and with daily chores Although the amount of public education available varies greatly from one African country to another generally schooling is mandatory at least through primary school When boys are old enough to be weaned and well before the onset of puberty they move out of their mother s home and move in with their father They begin to learn

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/key-moments-in-life/childhood/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Agricultural, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    on which farmers depend for sustenance A symbol of this power throughout Africa is the great bush buffalo one of the most feared of African mammals Among Mama Katana peoples of northern Nigeria masks that represent the bush cow are used by a secret society to which only men can belong which is called mangam The purpose of the society is to insure agricultural fertility and the general well being

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/abundance/agricultural/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Cosmologies, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    metaphors that share a dialogic existence each one balancing out the other in an attempt to achieve order The Mossi King Mogho Naba is symbolically represented by the sun and correlates his daily movement through his palace with the movement of the sun across the sky Zahan 1961 17 The sun and sky are also metaphors for Mossi chiefs The segment of Mossi society known as nakomse are descendants of

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/sacred-spaces/cosmologies/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Status of the Diviner, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    for knowing the history of the people and thus are able to confirm lines of descent As a result diviners are sometimes invested with regalia which is otherwise reserved for leaders The Kwere staff pictured here is an example of that sort of regalia The staffs are recognized as a form of protection for the diviner often figuratively representing the ancestors They filter out truth from the sometimes false information

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/divination/status-of-the-diviner/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Liminality, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    meaning threshold Just like when one stops in a doorway and is no longer in the hall but not yet in the room during the liminal period of ritual one stands at the threshold between one social status and another As the late Victor Turner wrote the betwixt and between nature of liminality releases initiands from ordinary rules and expectations Indeed ritual is specifically created so that initiands can reflect

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/education-initiation/liminality/ (2016-02-13)
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