archive-edu.com » EDU » U » UIOWA.EDU

Total: 455

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Zimbabwe - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Robert Gabriel Mugabe since 1987 Type of Government Parliamentary Democracy Date of Independence April 18 1980 Major Exports Platinum Cotton Gold Tobacco Ferroalloys Clothing Precolonial History Khoisan artifacts found in Zimbabwe indicate that the region was inhabited for thousands of years before the arrival of Bantu speaking migrants in the early 1st millennium CE The country derives its name from the Great Zimbabwe stone ruins constructed by indigenous ancestors of the Shona peoples between the 11th and 14th centuries The Portuguese were the first Europeans to explore inland territories of what is now Zimbabwe in the 16th century but never visited Great Zimbabwe Zimbabwe s colonial history began in 1888 when Cecil John Rhodes British South Africa Company obtained mining rights in present day Zambia and Zimbabwe European settlers began displacing indigenous peoples including the Shona and Ndebele who unsuccessfully rebelled against British rule in the 1890s In 1923 the territory known as Southern Rhodesia was declared a self governing British colony Britain consolidated its colonies into the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland in 1953 The federation was dissolved a decade later although Rhodesia remained under British control Postcolonial History In 1965 Prime Minister Ian Smith of the Rhodesian Front RF declared independence under white minority rule instigating years of civil war between the government and African nationalist groups The two major nationalist groups Joshua Nkomo s Zimbabwe African People s Union ZAPU and Robert Mugabe s Zimbabwe African National Union ZANU joined forces and formed the Patriotic Front in the 1970s In 1979 the British mediated a peace agreement and a new constitution guaranteeing minority rights The international community formally recognized Zimbabwe s independence in 1980 Mugabe was elected prime minister and assumed the role of Zimbabwe s first president in 1987 He has been re elected since that

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/countries/show/Zimbabwe (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Botswana - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Nickel Soda Ash Meat Textiles Precolonial History Hunters gatherers and herders occupied Botswana from about 17 000 BCE Bantu speaking farmers migrated from the north and settled in the area by 1000 CE The Tswana a Bantu people came to dominate the region European missionaries notably David Livingstone of Scotland began arriving in the 19th century and both Germany and Britain engaged in colonial expansion In 1885 the British proclaimed Bechuanaland a protectorate over their Tswana allies In 1895 the Bechuanaland Protectorate was divided into a northern territory which became modern Botswana and a southern territory which became part of Cape Colony in South Africa In 1909 Britain assured the Bechuanaland Protectorate Lesotho and Swaziland that their territories would not be incorporated into the proposed Union of South Africa but the threat of assimilation remained until the early 1960s Postcolonial History Britain accepted proposals for self government in 1964 leading to a new constitution a new seat of government at Gaborone and the country s first general elections in 1966 Independence leader Seretse Khama became Botswana s first president was re elected three times and died in office in 1980 He was succeeded by his vice president Sir Ketumile Masire who re established diplomatic relations with South Africa after apartheid was abolished in the early 1990s Masire was re elected until he retired in 1998 and was succeeded by his vice president Festus Mogae In 2000 floods devastated eastern Botswana and with a doubling of production and revenues from the diamond mining industry the Economist rated Botswana s economy as the second fastest growing in the world In 2006 Botswana celebrated forty years of independence and archaeologist Sheila Coulson discovered a 40 000 year old painted relief of a snake in the Tsodilo Hills In 2007 the country enlarged the

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/countries/show/Botswana (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Lesotho - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    gallery Info Capital Maseru Population 1 942 008 July 2014 est Climate Temperate Currency 1 USD 9 575 Maloti LSL 2013 est Important Cities Maseru Thaba Bosiu Roma Morija Teyateyaneng Matsieng royal palace Area 30 355 sq km People Nationality Mosotho singular Basotho plural Major Peoples South Sotho Religion Christianity 80 African religion 20 Literacy 89 6 Principal Language Sesotho Official Language Sesotho English Politics Head Of State King Letsie

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/countries/show/Lesotho (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Media - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Mbole Mende Mitsogo Mossi Mumuye Ngbaka Nkanu Nok Nuna Oron Owo Pende Pokot Punu San Sapi Senufo Shambaa Shona Songo Songye Suku Swahili Tabwa Tuareg Urhobo We Winiama Wodaabe Wolof Woyo Wum Yaka Yombe Yoruba Zaramo Zulu South Sotho Chapters Any Chapter Everyday Endeavor Key Moments in Life Education Initiation Abundance Sacred Spaces Divination Ancient Africa Arts of Healing Death Governance Cultural Exchange MediaType Image Art Photo Field Photo Audio Video Home Chapters Topic Essays Countries Peoples Media About Search Media Countries Any Country Cameroon Angola Bénin Burkina Faso Chad Congo Democratic Republic of the Congo Côte d Ivoire Gabon Ghana Guinea Bissau Guinea Conakry Kenya Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone South Africa Tanzania Togo Zambia Zimbabwe Botswana Lesotho Peoples Any People Akan Akuapem Akye Anyi Aowin Asante Babanki Baga Bali Bamana Bamileke Bamum Bangubangu Bangwa Baule Beembe Bembe Benin Kingdom Amazigh Berber Bidyogo Bobo Bushoong Bwa Cameroon Grasslands Chokwe Dan Diomande Djenné Dogon Eket Esie Fang Fante Fon Frafra Fulani Hausa Hemba Holoholo Ibibio Idoma Igbira Igbo Igbo Ukwu Ijo Kabre Karagwe Kassena Katana Kom Kongo Kota Kuba Kusu Kwahu Kwere Laka Lega Lobi Luba Luchazi Luluwa Lunda Luvale Lwalwa Maasai Makonde Mambila Mangbetu Manja Mbole Mende

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/media/index?Chapter=27&MediaType=Image&action_=Use+Filter (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Divination, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    most general details of the illness to the diviner for it should be the diviner s guiding spirits that provide information that allows the cause of affliction and the proper course for healing to be identified Divination takes many forms in Africa African divination unlike astrology and many other Oriental and Western forms looks back to the past rather than forward to the future People are aware there is some

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/divination/?start=1 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Divination, Page 3 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Photo by Martha G Anderson What past event or encounter may be the cause of this Was a neighbor inadvertently insulted in such a way that he or she is now causing the affliction through witchcraft Was an important sacrifice to an ancestral spirit forgotten Is some Earth spirit trying to gain the victim s attention through sickness so that it can then offer guidance and skill once proper recognition is given to the spirit The path that the diviner helps to trace takes many twists and turns through all the irrelevancies of one s past to the real cause of some misfortune Divination helps to determine the right path so that the agent of affliction can be identified When people have the sense that they have discovered the true cause of some difficulty then they often feel more secure and courageous for with the cause identified they can find a solution to the problem By looking back to the past the hope is that the present can be altered so that a better future may be anticipated Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Divination Techniques Status

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/divination/?start=2 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Divination, Page 4 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    of Iowa Museum of Art The Stanley Collection X1986 259 Among the Baule of the Côte d Ivoire the role of the diviner is linked to nearly every level of society Baule peoples believe in a parallel spirit world in which humans leave behind their spirit spouses when they enter this world When an adult Baule experiences difficulty assuming a gender specific role as in the case of a man not marrying or a woman not being able to bear children he or she may dream about the spirit spouse that has been left behind The troubled person consults a diviner who through communication with the spirit world and interpretation of the dream will prescribe the carving of a wooden figure which will attract the spirit spouse The afflicted person will then take care of the figure feeding dressing and polishing in hopes of appeasing the otherworldly lover which it represents Vogel 1980 Such figures are called waka snan people of wood for they embody the spirits of people in the parallel spirit world They are carved with beautiful hairstyles and scarification to entice the spirit into inhabiting the figure Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page See

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/divination/?start=3 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Divination, Page 6 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Amsterdam formerly University of Iowa Shambaa people Tanzania urban street healer Photo by Eileen Moyer When a person encounters misfortune in Africa the initial response is most often pragmatic Before visiting a diviner both traditional African and Western medicines are tried A diviner will be consulted in order to identify the cause of the problem only if the patient is not healed Divination continues to thrive despite the influences of Western medicine in contemporary African society Unlike Western biomedical notions that reduce human health to pathological matters many Africans define their entire identity in relation to external elements As a result Western based evaluations that ignore the relationship between the patient and the rest of society are often perceived as being insufficient The holistic approach of many African religious and healing systems searches for both social and physical causes of illness Resulting treatments often prescribe communal healing ceremonies that place the afflicted individual at the center of communal support and provide herbal and chemical treatments Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Subtopic Divination Techniques See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Divination Techniques Status of the Diviner Women as Diviners Chapters Everyday Endeavor Key Moments

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/divination/?start=5 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive