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  • Arts of Healing, Page 8 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Tanzania formerly Stanford University University of Iowa One of our mothers an elderly priestess of the goddess Odua Egbado Yoruba Nigeria 1975 Photo by H J Drewal and M T Drewal Before the appropriate prayers and offerings can be directed to the spirit world the cause of misfortune the identity of the evil doer and the will of the presiding spirit must be established As intermediaries to the spirit world ritual specialists priests diviners and healers serve the human community in establishing these connections However they also serve the spirit community Their abilities to communicate with the spirit world are vital to the preservation of balance between humans and supernatural beings as it is through them that the needs of the spirit realm are conveyed to the human realm and vice versa In addition the healer s keen understanding of human nature and the intricacies of social interaction secures his her place in society as one of the most revered sometimes even most feared members of a community Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Spirit Embodiments Rituals of Healing Chapters Everyday Endeavor Key Moments

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/arts-of-healing/?start=7 (2016-02-13)
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  • Arts of Healing, Page 9 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Democratic Republic of the Congo Yombe peoples Nkondi figure Wood nails screws cowries pigment other materials H 116 8 cm 46 Detroit Institute of Arts Founders Society Purchase Eleanor Clay Ford Fund for African Art 76 9 Among the Bantu speakers of central and east Africa waganga ritual specialists possess the esoteric knowledge of medicinal remedies and healing procedures both natural and supernatural sort Without this age old knowledge which is often passed on through the family line the diagnosis treatment and healing processes would be ineffective Although many objects used in the arts of healing are made by artists the nganga s own contribution to the visual and medicinal effectiveness of the object is essential to the success of the healing process Without the addition or accumulation of medicinal and symbolic substances without the offerings of prayers songs and performance without the strict adherence to long established steps of treatment all of which are determined and prescribed by the healer the objects would remain inanimate void of any power or healing capabilities Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next Subtopic Spirit Embodiments See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Spirit Embodiments Rituals

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/arts-of-healing/?start=8 (2016-02-13)
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  • Death, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    tadep figure from Mambila peoples was made of very soft pithy wood that is easily carved but which is quite fragile and lasts only briefly in the African environment African religions hold that the body and soul are separable and that the soul or spirit lives on after the body At death the spirit of the deceased joins the ancestors in a world that is similar to that of the

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/death/?start=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Death, Page 3 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    the Congo Kusu peoples Ancestor figure Wood beads textile H 83 cm 32 5 The University of Iowa Museum of Art The Stanley Collection X1986 553 From this other world the ancestors have the power to intervene in the lives of the living and are actively involved in the lives of their descendants The ancestors are concerned with the well being of the living but their interventions may be either beneficial or detrimental They protect and bless the living and are their descendants advocates in the spiritual world But if the living fail to give the deceased a proper funeral or do not show the dead the honor they deserve the deceased s spirit may haunt the living and disrupt their lives by causing illness and misfortune This large and impressive ancestor figure from the Kusu peoples of southeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo comes from an area where many different peoples carved such objects to honor ancestors who had made important contributions while alive to the well being of the clan Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Separation Liminality Mourning Reintegration Ancestors Chapters Everyday Endeavor Key Moments

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/death/?start=2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Death, Page 4 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    to another Rituals formalize this ontological change A number of anthropologists have considered death a rite of passage that involves three distinct phases 1 the separation of the deceased from the living 2 a period of mourning and preparation for the funeral and 3 the recognition and veneration of the deceased as an ancestor Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next Page See All View all images in the media

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/death/?start=3 (2016-02-13)
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  • Death, Page 5 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    surveys how art objects function within the context of death The chapter consists of three sub sections based on the three phase model The Deceased s Separation from the Living Liminality Mourning and Funeral Preparations and The Commemoration and Veneration of Ancestors Each sub section considers how performances and objects do the specific work necessary to assist the deceased in their transition to ancestorhood Prev 1 2 3 4 5

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/death/?start=4 (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    encrustation H 91 5 cm 36 Seattle Art Museum Gift of Katherine White and the Boeing Company 81 17 532 As Douglas Fraser and Herbert M Cole state in their classic work entitled African Art and Leadership in all human societies no matter how small or egalitarian there are those who lead and those who follow Yet the functions performed by African leaders vary greatly Some leaders may merely determine the auspicious time for planting or harvesting crops while others may mobilize and direct vast armies for war The acquisition of these various kinds of authority although sanctioned by tradition usually stems in part from individual physical skill aggressiveness wisdom accidents of birth and death plain good luck or more often from a combination of these 1972 295 Among Isoko and Urhobo peoples of southeastern Nigeria leadership comes as a result of one s right hand and many individuals own ivri small shrine figures to symbolize the power they have harnessed through the personality trait of truculence and through the efforts and labors exerted through the hand Peek 1986 Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Statement

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 3 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    University of California Los Angeles Democratic Republic of the Congo Lega peoples Iginga figure Ivory beads H 12 7 cm 5 The University of Iowa Museum of Art The Stanley Collection X1986 560 A useful distinction can be made between rule and leadership when considering the continuum of African political formations Rule refers to the absolute authority of a divine or sacred kingship while leadership has to do with consensus and influence in societies that lack kings or paramount rulers Among Lega peoples in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo there are no specialized or autonomous political roles or institutions Spiritual moral social and economic powers are dispersed among all members of society although members of the highest grades in the Bwami association play the most significant roles politically and otherwise The exercise of authority in Lega groups is intermittent and derives its sanctions from the group For Lega then it is more appropriate to speak of influence rather than of the power to coerce Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Statement Art Process Art Archaeology of Rule Art and Centralized Power Women and Political Power

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=2 (2016-02-13)
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