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  • Governance, Page 4 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Museum of Art The Stanley Collection X1986 571 Works of art including masks and figures in ivory and wood serve as didactic devices for issues of morality and ethics As individuals accede from one level to the next in the course of their lifetime the objects serve to remember precepts and maxims and to instill cultural values of the highest order Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=3 (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 5 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Cultural Exchange Governance By Mary Nooter Roberts University of California Los Angeles Benin Kingdom peoples Nigeria King of Benin Photo by Barbara W Blackmun The decentralization of Lega peoples can be contrasted with the centralized and highly differentiated sociopolitical system of the Benin Kingdom in Nigeria which flourished from the fifteenth to eighteenth centuries and continues today As Fraser and Cole explain 1972 the Oba or sacred king is at the apex of an elaborate state organization including a ranked court with specialized hereditary and appointed titles as well as craft and military guilds Prior to the advent of colonialism territorial rule and the collection of tribute were administered by titled appointees of the Oba who had control over the lives of his people in such widely disparate realms as land tenure and spiritual observances Away from the capital city however the complexity of administration decreased local chiefdoms and villages had less differentiated but still hieratic structures Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next Page See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Statement Art Process Art Archaeology of Rule Art and Centralized Power Women and Political Power Investiture Death Secrecy Political Space Checks and Balances

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=4 (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 6 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    frequently a sword When the Oba delegated to a chief powers of life and death over his own subjects this was marked by the presentation to him of the ceremonial sword ada Bradbury 1957 41 The use of swords as prestige emblems is characteristic of many African kingdoms including the Akan kingdoms of the Baule and Asante who made and used iron wood and gold swords for display Sword bearer

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=5 (2016-02-13)
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  • Governance, Page 7 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    of the Congo 1913 Photo by Herbert Lang One of the characteristics of rulers and leaders is their ability to commission control and distribute works of art and to inform them with meaning Fraser and Cole 1972 295 This section presents arts in a variety of sociopolitical contexts in Africa ranging from dynastic kingdoms and confederacies to communities governed by councils of elders and institutions of social control It will be seen that the arts associated with absolute authority are often confirmatory of power while those of more democratic forms of leadership are instructional and processual that is intended to effect change or to assist with social transitions Sometimes art is owned by an individual ruler or it may be held in trust by one or more leaders on behalf of special groups or the society at large In all cases works of art assist leaders in their task which is to exert influence over other people whether this be in the moral military spiritual economic social or political sectors of life ibid 295 Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next Subtopic Statement Art See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Statement Art Process Art

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/governance/?start=6 (2016-02-13)
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  • Cultural Exchange, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Sierra Leone Sapi peoples Salt cellar ca 1490 1530 Ivory H 20 7 cm 8 1 8 Seattle Art Museum Nasli and Alice Heeramaneck Collection 68 31 Change is not restricted to African arts of the twentieth century In fact African art forms have always been in flux accommodating new ideas and foreign influences The greatest works of traditional African art are those that respect the stylistic canons while departing from conservative models For example sixteenth century hybrid masterworks known as Afro Portuguese ivories were made by artists along the west and central African coast upon commission by Portuguese sailor merchants who recognized the mastery of African ivory sculptors and wished to return to Europe with exotic gifts for royalty Often the artists used traditional African carving techniques to make objects inspired by European forms and or motifs This salt cellar must have been created by a Sherbro artist for export for it conforms precisely to the taste of sixteenth century European nobility and was probably intended for a table of the European Renaissance Prev 1 2 Next Subtopic Exchange See All View all images in the media gallery Subtopics Exchange New Materials and Contexts Recycling Tradition Chapters Everyday Endeavor

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/chapters/cultural-exchange/?start=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Brass Casting, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Regalia Do in Leaves and Wood Among the Bobo and the Bwa Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles Ifa Divination Igbo Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Brass Casting by Raymond Silverman University of Michigan 14 th century Egyptian brass container Nsoko Ghana Photo by Raymond Silverman This large basin is locally referred to as Ayaa Kenten lit brass basket Local traditions recall that it descended from heaven and was gift from Nyame God to

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/27?start=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Brass Casting, Page 3 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Brass Casting by Raymond Silverman University of Michigan Pouring a libation on an ancient Egyptian vessel Nsoko Ghana Photo by Raymond Silverman It is of little consequence that the basin is in a poor state of repair for it no longer functions as a container for products of the material world The basin is perceived by the people of Nsoko as having supernatural powers that can assist the town in times of need It is said that it is particularly effective during periods of drought Here Kwasi Duro the custodian for Ayaa Kenten in 1980 is pouring

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/27?start=2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Akan Brass Casting, Page 4 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Wood Among the Bobo and the Bwa Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles Ifa Divination Igbo Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Akan Brass Casting by Raymond Silverman University of Michigan Brass vessel Kuruwa Nsoko Ghana Photo by Raymond Silverman This vessel is part of a group brass objects collectively known as nkuruwa lit cups Unlike Ayaa Kenten this group of brass objects is associated with traditions of origin for the people of Nsoko It is

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/27?start=3 (2016-02-13)
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