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  • Benin Kingdom Leadership Regalia, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Benin Kingdom Leadership Regalia by Kathy Curnow Cleveland State University Confirmation of Iyase n Udo Benin Kingdom Nigeria 1995 Photo by Kathy Curnow When the Oba of Benin wants to honor someone with a chieftaincy title he sends night messengers to the man s home In two days time the newly titled man travels to the palace and thanks the ruler for the honor this is a relatively low key ceremony Some time afterward the more public confirmation shown here takes place The honoree goes to the

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/17 (2016-02-13)
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  • Do in Leaves and Wood Among the Bobo and the Bwa, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    religious belief of the peoples of central and western Burkina Faso as well as numerous groups in northern Ivory coast and southeastern Mali Engravings that accompanied the publication of Binger s travels to Kong in 1887 89 record the use of leaf or fiber masks to represent Do a century ago The congregation continues to flourish and ceremonies at which leaf and fiber masks representing Do appear are common occurrences in western Burkina each year from March to June In Burkina Faso the congregation of Do appears to have originated among Mande speakers primarily the Bobo and to have spread to one Voltaic group to the east the Bwa 3 The Marka Dafing a Mande group who penetrated the valley of the Sourou river in the 1600 s may have carried the congregation of Do with them and adopted the use of Voltaic mask styles from their new neighbors the Nunuma and the Winiama 4 Although the Bwa and the Bobo are similar in several ways especially in the lack of central political authority and the common congregation of Do they are quite different in their world view The Bwa are open and receptive to outside influences and their society is in a constant process of change while the Bobo are far more conservative preferring to preserve the purity of their traditions 5 These differences in resistance and receptivity to change is reflected by their adherence to the congregation of Do 1 The original text of this paper was presented at the Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association Denver Colorado November 21 1987 for a panel titled Exploring the Lands of Do 2 I use the spellings published by Le Moal for the Bobo Dwo and Capron for the Bwa Do to remind the reader that we are concerned

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/39 (2016-02-13)
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  • Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    of the Bamana Blacksmith Bamana Women s Pottery Benin Kingdom Leadership Regalia Do in Leaves and Wood Among the Bobo and the Bwa Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles Ifa Divination Igbo Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles by Fred T Smith Kent State University Leather worker Frafra peoples Ghana 1973 Photo by Fred T Smith During the past few centuries leatherwork has been an extremely profitable and widespread industry for

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/11 (2016-02-13)
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  • Ifa Divination, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Regalia Do in Leaves and Wood Among the Bobo and the Bwa Frafra Leatherwork and Brass Bangles Ifa Divination Igbo Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Ifa Divination by John Pemberton III Professor Emeritus Amherst College The Oloriawo d 1991 the leader of Ifa priests in the Igbomina town of Ila Orangun Nigeria June 1972 Photo by John Pemberton III Yoruba priests of ifa are known as babalawo fathers of secrets Trained from their youth

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/16 (2016-02-13)
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  • Igbo Art in Social Context, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Art in Social Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Igbo Art in Social Context by Herbert M Cole Professor Emeritus University of California Santa Barbara An Ozo titled man with his wife on the day of his installation Agwa 1983 Photo by Herbert M Cole Title taking validates individual achievement in this competitive egalitarian and largely acephalous chiefless agricultural society The Igbo population ca twelve to fifteen million are among the larger ethnic groups of West Africa Government in pre colonial times was by councils of elders and titled men except in the few areas especially those influenced by Benin and Edo peoples that had chiefs Conceptually the human couple stands at the base of Igbo culture as the procreative social unit responsible for the family or corporate lineage The lineage is the fundamental institution upon which Igbo society is based Although ostensibly and publicly male dominated women are nevertheless accorded substantial power both in everyday life market women often become very wealthy and powerful and in the arts Male female duality and reciprocity are in fact stressed

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/15 (2016-02-13)
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  • Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa by Allen F Roberts University of California Los Angeles formerly University of Iowa Elderly man lost in contemplative reading in a Moorish sanctuary of Marrakech Morocco 1995 Photo by Mary Nooter Roberts and Allen F Roberts Submitted by Allen F Roberts The first diasporic Muslim community was on the African continent for the Prophet Muhammed sent some of his family to safe refuge in Ethiopia as he fled Mecca for Medina Soon after the Prophet s death an Islamic sultanate was founded on the island of Dahlak off the

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Komo among Tagwa-Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Context Islam and Islamic Arts in Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso by Boureima T Diamitani West African Museums Programme Mali Bamana peoples Koulikoro region Warakun or Kòmòkun Kòmò Association Helmet Crest Mask Wood animal fur porcupine quills duiker oribi and roan antelope horns feathers mirror sacrificial patina 44 4 x 76 2 x 35 4 cm 17 1 2 x 30 x 10 New Orleans Museum of Art Gift of Kent and Charles Davis 92 804 The Senufo Numbering over 2 500 000 Senufo people inhabit a large area of West Africa currently divided among three countries Mali Côte d Ivoire and Burkina Faso From the north Senufo region begins close to the city of San in Mali to the south to the city of Dabakala in Côte d Ivoire To the west the Senufo are bordered by the Bagouè and the Bafing Rivers and the eastern border is formed by the source of the Mouhoun River just west of Bobo Dioulasso and runs parallel with the Leraba River and the province of Comoé

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/42 (2016-02-13)
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  • Kuba Art and Rule, Page 1 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Kuba Art and Rule by Joseph Aurélien Cornet 1919 2004 Formerly Institute for National Museums of Congo The Kuba king presides over a conference Democratic Republic of the Congo Photograph by Angelo Turconi If the king of the Kuba possesses absolute power this power is effectively controlled most especially by the senior officials and titleholders The result is the importance and the frequency of conferences In order to emphasize their independence the titleholders never gather inside the palace rather they gather outside the enclosure The large structure called nshool which is visible behind the king

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/35 (2016-02-13)
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