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  • Art and Rule in the Benin Kingdom, Page 25 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Africa Komo among Tagwa Senufo Peoples in Southwest Burkina Faso Kuba Art and Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art and Rule in the Benin Kingdom by Barbara W Blackmun Professor Emeritus San Diego Mesa College Ihama of Ihogbe bringing Ewere leaves to the Oba Oba s Palace Benin City Nigeria December 1981 Photo by Barbara W Blackmun Singing the chorus Ewere mwen Ewere rue Your good fortune is my good fortune your joy is mine they request the palace gates to open to their gifts Early in the morning of the Ewere Festival before dawn bands

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/4?start=24 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 2 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Rule Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Shrine for Wonyinghi the creator Azuzama Bassan clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1979 Photo by Martha G Anderson The Ijo believe that both people and spirits originate far off in the sky in a place called Wonyinghibou or Our Mother s Forest and return there after death to await rebirth They reason that the creator is female because only women can bear children Wonyinghi takes little interest in earthly events but some Central Ijo towns seek her help in

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=1 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 3 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Zibe bari ritual to change the birth agreement Korokorosei Olodiama clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1979 Photo by Martha G Anderson Before acquiring bodies people appear before Wonyinghi to tell her whether they will be rich or poor fertile or barren this contract governs their lives and even specifies how they will die Because of their extreme naiveté before birth some people choose badly This young woman s prenatal agreement prevents her from bearing healthy children so a diviner has prescribed

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 4 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Bouyou seimo ritual to address problems caused by nature spirits Korokorosei Olodiama clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1979 Photo by Martha G Anderson Spirits or orumo mingle with people in Wonyinghibou but have their own communities on earth The Ijo distinguish between two types of spirits whose appearance and behavior contrast as sharply as their habitats water spirits can harm people but tend to be far less irritable and vindictive than their counterparts on land who kill at the slightest provocation People

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=3 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 5 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    Life in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Man with nature spirit companion Ikibiri Ekpetiama clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1978 Photo by Martha G Anderson The spirits people befriend in Wonyinghibou sometimes follow them to earth some simply demand offerings but others request that objects be provided for their use as earthly receptacles Spirits who want attention typically alert their human friends or relatives by causing illness misfortune or strange behavior Nature spirits sometimes cause people to behave combatively reflecting their own anti social tendencies When this

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=4 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 6 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Shrine for the nature spirit Osuwo owei Rainman Umugbene Olodiama clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1979 Photo by Martha G Anderson Spirits sometimes ask people to join or establish shrines they can enforce their demands with death threats but typically promise benefits to those who cooperate Followers often complain of the dangers involved in serving nature spirits who tend to punish them for the slightest transgressions but the more irascible the spirit the better he is at protecting them from evil spirits

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=5 (2016-02-13)
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  • Art from the Ijo Spirit World, Page 7 - Art & Life in Africa - The University of Iowa Museum of Art
    in the Cameroon Grasslands Luba Art and Divination Mangbetu Royal Art and Herbert Lang 1902 1906 Masquerades Among the Dan People Mbari Art as Process in Igboland Military Arts of the Fante Nature Spirits and Arts in Burkina Faso Puppet Masquerades in the Valley of the Niger Sculpture of the Bamana Jo Society Signs and Symbols in African Art Graphic Patterns in Burkina Faso Textiles in Mali The Art of Burkina Faso The Status of Dogon Visual Culture Visual Symbols of Self South Sotho Arts and Initiation Weaving in Southern Nigeria Women s Art and Initiation in Mendeland Yoruba Gelede Masquerade Young Women in Contemporary Zulu Society Art from the Ijo Spirit World by Martha G Anderson Alfred University Shrine for the nature spirit Apeghele Olugbobiri Olodiama clan Central Ijo peoples Nigeria 1979 Photo by Martha G Anderson In contrast to spirits living on land water spirits tend to be benevolent beings who bring people children and money Instead of black or dark blue the colors bush spirits use to signify indomitability water spirits like white a color which connotes spirituality and wealth they prefer offerings of imported food and beverages like corned beef and Sprite to the local produce

    Original URL path: https://africa.uima.uiowa.edu/topic-essays/show/21?start=6 (2016-02-13)
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