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  • SBN Mission Support: DAWN
    PDS Home Management Engineering Mission Websites Here we list links to the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Dawn NSSDC Dawn NASA Dawn SSE Dawn DAWN The Dawn spacecraft launched 27 September 2007 After completing an initial check out phase in December 2007 Dawn began its interplanetary cruise phase which included a gravity assist from Mars in February 2009 that put the spacecraft on a trajectory to rendezvous with the asteroid 4 Vesta in July 2011 After observing Vesta for a year the spacecraft will depart in July 2012 and spend over 2 5 years travelling to the dwarf planet Ceres or 1 Ceres the asteroid Dawn will rendezvous with Ceres in February 2015 and will spend 6 months taking measurements before departing in July 2015 end of mission Dawn s primary science goal is to gain an understanding of the conditions and processes occurring when the solar system was only about 10 million years old It will measure the size shape mass volume and spin rate of the two protoplanets Vesta and Ceres to determine their internal structure density and homogeneity Dawn will also investigate their thermal history by measuring the elemental and mineral abundances It will image their surfaces to determine their bombardment and tectonic history and use gravity spin and magnetic data to limit the size of any metallic core Instruments Framing Camera FC Full surface imagery in seven colors at Vesta and three at Ceres Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer VIR Full surface mineralogical mapping in two bands VIS channel covers 0 25 1 micron and IR channel covers 0 95 5 micron Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector GRaND Abundances of major rock forming elements O Mg Al Si Ca Ti

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/dawn/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: Deep Impact
    its three instruments survived the encounter with Tempel 1 and resumed operations from October 2007 to February 2011 for the EPOXI mission The SBN is the lead PDS node to archive the Deep Impact mission data The Deep Impact Project Data Management Plan is available as a PDF file 518Kb Instruments H igh R esolution I nstrument I nfra r ed Spectrometer HRI IR H igh R esolution I nstrument Vis ible CCD HRI VIS M edium R esolution I nstrument Vis ible CCD MRI VIS I mpactor T argeting S ensor Vis ible CCD ITS VIS Data Sets Pre launch Testing Thermal Vacuum 1 HRI IR Spectral Data Thermal Vacuum 2 HRI IR Spectral HRI VIS Image Data Thermal Vacuum 3 ITS VIS Image Data Thermal Vacuum 4 HRI IR Spectral HRI VIS MRI VIS Image Data Cruise HRI IR HRI IR Raw Calibration Spectra from Cruise HRI VIS HRI VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise Navigation HRI VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise MRI VIS MRI VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise Navigation MRI VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise v1 1 ITS VIS ITS VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise Navigation ITS VIS Raw Calibration Images from Cruise v1 1 Encounter HRI IR HRI IR Raw Spectra and Calibrations from Encounter HRI IR 9P Tempel 1 Encounter Reduced Spectra v3 0 HRI VIS HRI VIS Raw Images and Calibrations from Encounter HRI VIS 9P Tempel 1 Encounter Calibrated Images v3 0 Navigation HRI VIS Raw Images and Calibrations from Encounter Navigation HRI VIS Calibrated Images from Encounter MRI VIS MRI VIS Raw Images and Calibrations from Encounter MRI VIS 9P Tempel 1 Encounter Calibrated Images v3 0 Navigation MRI VIS Raw Images and Calibrations from Encounter v1 1 Navigation MRI VIS Calibrated Images from Encounter v1 1

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/deepimpact/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: DS1
    Mission Websites Here we list links to the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Deep Space 1 NSSDC Deep Space 1 NASA na SSE Deep Space 1 Wikipedia Deep Space 1 DS1 Deep Space 1 Deep Space 1 DS1 launched on 24 October 1998 the first of NASA s New Millennium Program missions to test and validate high risk and low cost advanced technologies in space After the start tracker failed 11 November 1999 it was not one of the 12 advanced technologies on board the DS1 team re engineered the on board Miniature Integrated Camera Spectrometer MICAS instrument as a replacement star tracker On 28 July 1999 DS1 flew by the near Earth asteroid 9969 Braille at an estimated altitude of 26 km The scientific goals included measuring the gross physical properties surface composition and interaction of the asteroid with the solar wind The DS1 primary mission ended 18 September 1999 but the mission was extended to include a flyby a comet On 22 September 2001 UT 22 30 Deep Space 1 successfully passed within 2 200 kilometers of comet 19P Borrelly The scientific goals included measuring the gross physical properties of the nucleus coma features interaction of the coma with the solar wind plasma properties and plasma composition of the coma and tail The DS1 mission effectively ended after the encounter with Borrelly The SBN is the lead node to archive DS1 data from the Borrelly encounter into the PDS The USGS Astrogeology Research Program holds the MICAS archive It includes the original engineering data records and calibrated data in cube format from the MICAS Visible CCD and IR Spectrometer Nucleus topographic models and Borrelly animations are also held at the USGS Instruments

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/deepspace1/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: EPOXI
    TRES 2 TRES 3 WASP 3 XO 2 and XO 3 to look for perturbations due to terrestrial planets in low order resonances and search those same systems for secondary occultations of the hot Jupiter by the star In October 2009 EPOCh used the HRI Visible CCD to image the transiting exoplanet microlensing target MOA 2009 BLG 266 EPOCh also utilized the HRI Visible CCD and the HRI Infrared Spectrometer to characterize Earth 2008 and 2009 and Mars 2009 only as analogs for extrasolar planets DIXI Deep Impact eXtended Investigation consisted of a flyby of 103P Hartley 2 at a closest approach distance of 700 km on 4 November 2010 in order to study a second short period comet with the same set of instrumentation as was used at 9P Tempel 1 The SBN is the lead PDS node to archive the EPOXI mission data The EPOXI project also delivered the PDS formatted EPOCh data to the Multi Mission Archive at the STScI MAST Instruments H igh R esolution I nstrument I nfra r ed Spectrometer HRI IR H igh R esolution I nstrument Vis ible CCD HRI VIS M edium R esolution I nstrument Vis ible CCD MRI VIS Data Sets In Flight Calibrations HRI IR In flight Calibration Spectra v2 0 Raw HRI VIS In flight Calibration Images v2 0 Raw MRI VIS In flight Calibration Images v2 0 Raw EPOCh HRII HRI IR EPOCh Earth Spectra Raw HRI IR EPOCh Earth Calibrated Spectra v2 0 HRI IR EPOCh Mars Spectra Raw HRI IR EPOCh Mars Calibrated Spectra HRI IR In flight Lunar Calibrated Spectra HRIV HRI VIS EPOCh Exoplanet Transit Images Raw HRI VIS EPOCh Exoplanet Transit Images Calibrated HRI VIS EPOCh Exoplanet Transit Photometry HRI VIS EPOCh Earth Images Raw HRI VIS EPOCh Earth Images Calibrated

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/epoxi/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: Galileo
    the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Galileo archived NSSDC Galileo Orbiter NASA na Galileo Mission to Jupiter and Europa Galileo launched on 18 October 1989 and began orbiting Jupiter in December 1995 During the outbound trip Galileo flew by the asteroids 951 Gaspra in October 1991 and 253 Ida in August 1993 Images from the latter flyby revealed that Ida was itself orbited by a tiny moon subsequently named Dactyl This was the first known case of a solar system small body with its own natural satellite Galileo was also positioned to observe the far side of Jupiter in July 1994 when the fragments of comet D Shoemaker Levy 9 impacted the planet Once in orbit around Jupiter Galileo dropped a probe to record the first direct observations of the Jovian atmosphere The original Galileo mission was extended into the Galileo Europa Mission in which the spacecraft undertook an intensive study of the moon Europa the Io plasma torus and Io itself The mission ended on 21 September 2003 when the spacecraft descended into the Jovian atmosphere The SBN is the lead node for archiving Dust Detector System data for Galileo Instruments Instrument Details Data from these instruments are archived at SBN Dust Detector System DDS Magnetometer MAG Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer NIMS Photopolarimeter Radiometer PPR Visible and IR Solid State Imaging System SSI Ultraviolet Spectrometer UVS Other Instruments Spacecraft has other instruments data from which are archived at another PDS node Energetic Particles Detector EPD Charged particles in the immediate vicinity of Galileo Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer EUV Volatile gases from Galilean satellites upper Jovian atmosphere Heavy Ion Counter HIC Monitor environment for energetic heavy ions Data Sets Cruise Jupiter Orbit DDS Interplanetary and

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/galileo/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: Giotto
    Designation Formats Periodic Comet Names Designations PDS Nodes Atmospheres Geosciences Imaging Navigation Ancillary Information Facility NAIF Planetary Plasma Interactions PPI Planetary Rings Small Bodies PDS Support PDS Home Management Engineering Mission Websites Here we list links to the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Giotto ESA NSSDC Giotto ESA Giotto Giotto Mission The Giotto spacecraft was launched on 2 July 1985 to study comet 1P Halley The spacecraft carried instruments to image the nucleus analyze components of the cometary coma the cometary atmosphere and ionosphere cometary dust particles and plasma flows resulting from the interaction of cometary and solar wind Giotto encountered comet 1P Halley on 13 March 1986 and came within 596 km of the nucleus Following the encounter Giotto was placed into a hibernation mode The spacecraft was reactivated for an extended mission in 1992 Giotto encountered comet 26P Grigg Skjellerup on 10 July 1992 and came within a distance of approximately 200 km of the nucleus Spacecraft operations were terminated on 23 July 1992 The SBN is the lead PDS node for archiving Giotto data which are also available through the ESA Planetary Science Archive On Board Instruments Instrument Details Data from these instruments are archived at SBN Dust Impact Detector System DID Energetic Particle Analyzer EPA Radio Science Experiment GRE Halley Multimeter Camera HMC Ion Mass Spectrometer IMS Johnstone Plasma Analyzer JPA Magnetometer MAG Optical Probe Experiment OPE Particle Impact Analyzer PIA Other Instruments Spacecraft has other instruments data from which are archived at another PDS node Neutral Mass Spectrometer NMS Composition and energy of neutral gas in the coma RPA Réme Copernic Plasma Experiment RPA Velocity distributions of electrons composition distribution of thermal positive ions near comet Mission Data Giotto

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/giotto/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: Giotto Extended Mission
    Chandra Hubble Spitzer ESA Planetary Sci Archive Data related Resources Data Release Schedule Small Body Designation Formats Periodic Comet Names Designations PDS Nodes Atmospheres Geosciences Imaging Navigation Ancillary Information Facility NAIF Planetary Plasma Interactions PPI Planetary Rings Small Bodies PDS Support PDS Home Management Engineering Mission Websites Here we list links to the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Giotto ESA NSSDC Giotto ESA Giotto Giotto Extended Mission The Giotto spacecraft was launched on 2 July 1985 to study comet 1P Halley The spacecraft carried instruments to image the nucleus analyze components of the cometary coma the cometary atmosphere and ionosphere cometary dust particles and plasma flows resulting from the interaction of cometary and solar wind Giotto encountered comet 1P Halley on 13 March 1986 and came within 596 km of the nucleus Following the encounter Giotto was placed into a hibernation mode The spacecraft was reactivated for an extended mission in 1992 Giotto encountered comet 26P Grigg Skjellerup on 10 July 1992 and came within a distance of approximately 200 km of the nucleus Spacecraft operations were terminated on 23 July 1992 The SBN is the lead PDS node for archiving Giotto data which are also available through the ESA Planetary Science Archive On Board Instruments Instrument Details Data from these instruments are archived at SBN Dust Impact Detector System DID Energetic Particle Analyzer EPA Radio Science Experiment GRE Halley Multimeter Camera HMC Ion Mass Spectrometer IMS Johnstone Plasma Analyzer JPA Magnetometer MAG Optical Probe Experiment OPE Particle Impact Analyzer PIA Other Instruments Spacecraft has other instruments data from which are archived at another PDS node Neutral Mass Spectrometer NMS Composition and energy of neutral gas in the coma RPA Réme Copernic Plasma Experiment

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/gem/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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  • SBN Mission Support: Hayabusa
    Intro Organization Contact Us Visiting SBN What are Small Bodies Related Links Data Archives Archived at SBN By Mission By Target By Data Type Archived Elsewhere Chandra Hubble Spitzer ESA Planetary Sci Archive Data related Resources Data Release Schedule Small Body Designation Formats Periodic Comet Names Designations PDS Nodes Atmospheres Geosciences Imaging Navigation Ancillary Information Facility NAIF Planetary Plasma Interactions PPI Planetary Rings Small Bodies PDS Support PDS Home Management Engineering Mission Websites Here we list links to the primary mission website as well as pages about the mission on other sites such as the NSSDC NASA portal etc Mission Hayabusa JAXA NSSDC Hayabusa NASA Hayabusa Hayabusa formerly Muses C Mission Hayabusa formerly Muses C is a joint asteroid sample return mission between the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science of Japan ISAS and NASA The spacecraft was launched from Kagoshima Space Center in Japan on 9 May 2003 Hayabusa arrived at asteroid 25143 Itokawa 1998 SF36 on 12 September 2005 and remained close to the asteroid in a station keeping heliocentric orbit Hayabusa studied Itokawa from altitudes of 20km to 3km from mid September through the end of November 2005 An attempt to deploy a tiny hopper named Minerva on 12 November failed when the small vehicle missed the asteroid On 19 November Hayabusa landed briefly on Itokawa and collected particles near the surface a second landing and sample capture was performed on 26 November Problems with the spacecraft delayed the start of the cruise back to Earth until April 2007 On 13 June 2010 Hayabusa successfully delivered the return capsule containing the samples to Earth In October 2010 the mission team announced the sample canister had collected approximately 100 particles The SBN is the lead node for archiving data from Hayabusa into the PDS Instruments Instrument Details Data

    Original URL path: http://pdssbn.astro.umd.edu/data_sb/missions/hayabusa/index.shtml (2015-06-02)
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