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  • ADW: Home
    Other animal phyla What s New at ADW We found a great new source of animal photos such as the guinea lion shown below so we ll be featuring them today Be sure to scroll through the image carousel on the home page to see them all April 01 2014 132 taxon accounts updated since October 14 2013 February 06 2014 Contributor Gallery Myers Phil updated January 17 2014 January 17 2014 Have you ever heard of Steller s sea cows January 17 2014 Navajo Nation explores ant biodiversity on their lands January 16 2014 cu r io connects citizens with scientists January 16 2014 Like the Animal Diversity Web on Facebook https www facebook com animaldiversityweb January 12 2014 Fascinating research on the importance of large carnivores in global ecosystems January 10 2014 ADW Director Dr Phil Myers quoted on silver linings to the polar vortex on NPR January 09 2014 Contributor Gallery Harding James updated December 16 2013 December 16 2013 News Archive Animal Headlines Rare Merseyside lizards get a helping hand with egg laying June 20 2014 via Wildlife Extra News Conservationist Pete Bethune launches a writing competition for young people June 20 2014 via Wildlife Extra News Strict diet suspends development doubles lifespan of worms June 20 2014 via ScienceDaily Animal News Testing biological treatment for pathogens that are killing honeybees and bats June 19 2014 via ScienceDaily Animal News Horse care Start mosquito protection methods now veterinarians urge June 19 2014 via ScienceDaily Animal News Researcher finds that fish are intelligent and feel pain like humans June 19 2014 via Wildlife Extra News Nearly 150 endangered wildlife seized at Indonesian airport June 19 2014 via Wildlife Extra News Young orangutan plus 150 other wild animals found in suitcases at Indonesian airport June 19 2014 via

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: About Us
    scientific questions and with the help of a good teacher experience the excitement and satisfaction of doing science Our long term goal is to create a database rich enough that students can discover for themselves basic concepts in organismal and conservation biology A Virtual Museum ADW provides a way to make the contents of research museums available globally for teaching and research So far our efforts have been directed mainly at mammals Photographs of scientific specimens are available for representative species from most mammal families We ve also included several hundred Quick Time Virtual Reality Movies of skulls These allow the user to rotate the specimen providing an excellent impression of its 3 dimensional structure We ve written in depth about and illustrated many of the characteristics of interest to students of mammals An important goal for the future is to expand to cover other groups of animals and include other media such as animal behavior video Contribute to Animal Diversity Web An essential feature of the ADW is student authorship of species accounts Students learn considerable detail about the biology of a species then share their work with users worldwide by making it part of our permanent database Our web based template ensures a consistent format for accounts Help pages suggest content and sources The system checks that no one else is writing about the student s chosen species checks spelling of scientific names and fills in the scientific classification Instructors and ADW staff review and edit accounts before they are added to the site Classes at dozens of universities and colleges contribute to the ADW project The resulting growth of the database makes us even better for inquiry learning If you might be interested in having your students write accounts please go to Teaching Resources and fill out

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/about/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: About Animal Names
    Diversity Web online Accessed at http animaldiversity org Disclaimer The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students ADW doesn t cover all species in the world nor does it include all the latest scientific information about organisms we describe Though we edit our accounts for accuracy we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts While ADW staff and contributors provide references to books

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/animal_names/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: Education Resources
    www pulsecommunity org The Animal Diversity Web has been used by educators globally to support the learning experiences of their students in organismal biology courses such as zoology evolution behavior and ecology One way students engage with ADW is through authorship of species accounts as part of their coursework In addition because of the highly structured nature of the web site students can explore patterns and relationships in the data through the Quaardvark advanced search interface Read to learn more about our undergraduate and K 12 initiatives Or contact us to let us know how we can help you and your students explore animal diversity Take our survey Help us improve the site Search Enter search text Search Search in feature Taxon Information Contributor Galleries Topics Classification Explore Data Quaardvark Search Guide Education Resources We support undergraduate education We support K 12 education Contribute to ADW To cite this page Myers P R Espinosa C S Parr T Jones G S Hammond and T A Dewey 2014 The Animal Diversity Web online Accessed at http animaldiversity org Disclaimer The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students ADW doesn t cover all species in

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/teach/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: Special Collections
    animaldiversity org Disclaimer The Animal Diversity Web is an educational resource written largely by and for college students ADW doesn t cover all species in the world nor does it include all the latest scientific information about organisms we describe Though we edit our accounts for accuracy we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts While ADW staff and contributors provide references to books and websites that we believe are

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/collections/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: Glossary: A
    of time after birth hatching In birds naked and helpless after hatching See Also precocial ambulacral those areas of an echinoderms body that bear tube feet ambulacral grooves radial grooves along which tube feet project to the exterior of the organism amniotic egg An egg protected by a series of membranes the amnion which surrounds the embryo with a constant amniotic fluid environment the allantois which allows gas diffusion and waste removal the yolk sac providing a food source for the embryo and the chorion a protective layer around the entire egg Synapomorphy of the Amniota amoebocyte an animal cell without a fixed position in the body they are able to wander throughout the body and feed on foreign particles such as invading bacteria Examples are leucocytes in mammalian blood amphibious Able to live both on land and in the water amphidromous Referring to fish that migrate between fresh and salt water but not as part of their life cycle Migrations usually occur for short periods of feeding and amphidromy is common among fishes that inhabit islands ampullae the enlarged end of a tube or canal used to refer to the enlarged ends of echinoderm tube feet an enlargement at the end of the semicircular canals of the inner ear of vertebrates or more generally the dilated end of a vessel or duct anadromous Referring to fish that live primarily in salt water but migrate to fresh water to reproduce Most of the growth takes place in oceans and no significant feeding occurs when spawning migration commences See Also catadromous anaerobic Deriving energy from a process that does not require free oxygen compare aerobic anterior describing the part of an animal or position of a structure that is oriented towards the front in normal locomotion anti predator behavior actions an organism takes to keep predators from eating it aposematic having coloration that serves a protective function for the animal usually used to refer to animals with colors that warn predators of their toxicity For example animals with bright red or yellow coloration are often toxic or distasteful having colors that act to protect the animal often from predators For example animals that are bright red or yellow are often toxic or distasteful their colors discourage predators from eating them appendage body part that sticks out like a leg or toe or antenna aquatic Living mainly in the water aquatic biomes major categories of aquatic habitats such as coastal pelagic or benthic regions etc arachnid a species in a class of arthropods which includes mostly air breathing invertebrates including spiders scorpions mites and ticks Arachnids have a body with two segments with the front segment having four pairs of legs and no antennae arboreal Referring to an animal that lives in trees tree climbing archeocyte an amoeboid cell type found in sponges which can differentiate into several other specialized cells including sclerocytes which secrete spicules spongocytes which secret spongin fibers and collencytes which secrete fibrillar collagen Archeocytes can also ingest particles

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/glossary/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: Animalia: INFORMATION
    group the vertebrates is relatively inconsequential from a diversity perspective Research continues on the evolutionary relationships of the major groups of animals For the sake of convenience the Animal Diversity Web follows the system outlined in Hickman and Roberts 1994 For some groups we incorporate the results of current research in our classification and discussion Contributors Phil Myers author Museum of Zoology University of Michigan Ann Arbor Take our survey Help us improve the site Search Enter search text Search Search in feature Taxon Information Contributor Galleries Topics Classification Explore Data Quaardvark Search Guide Navigation Links Information Pictures Specimens Sounds Maps Classification Classification Kingdom Animalia animals Animalia information 1 Animalia pictures 19697 Animalia specimens 7386 Animalia sounds 709 Animalia maps 42 Related Taxa Unspecified Annelida segmented worms Annelida information 1 Annelida pictures 33 Class Aplacophora Aplacophora information 1 Aplacophora pictures 5 Unspecified Arthropoda arthropods Arthropoda information 1 Arthropoda pictures 4475 Arthropoda specimens 116 Class Bivalvia Bivalvia information 1 Bivalvia pictures 53 Bivalvia specimens 58 Bivalvia maps 42 Unspecified Brachiopoda lamp shells Brachiopoda information 1 Brachiopoda pictures 5 Phylum Bryozoa moss animals Bryozoa information 1 Bryozoa pictures 10 Class Cephalopoda Cephalopoda information 1 Cephalopoda pictures 25 Cephalopoda specimens 2 Unspecified Chaetognatha arrow worms Chaetognatha information 1 Chaetognatha pictures 7 Phylum Chordata chordates Chordata information 1 Chordata pictures 14626 Chordata specimens 7106 Chordata sounds 709 Phylum Cnidaria corals sea anemones jellyfish and relatives Cnidaria information 1 Cnidaria pictures 133 Cnidaria specimens 7 Unspecified Ctenophora comb jellies Ctenophora information 1 Ctenophora specimens 1 Unspecified Cycliophora lobster symbionts Cycliophora information 1 Cycliophora pictures 1 Unspecified Echinodermata sea stars sea urchins sea cucumbers and relatives Echinodermata information 1 Echinodermata pictures 64 Echinodermata specimens 16 Unspecified Entoprocta hairy back worms Entoprocta information 1 Entoprocta pictures 4 Entoprocta specimens 2 Class Gastropoda Gastropoda information 1 Gastropoda pictures

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Animalia/ (2014-06-21)
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  • ADW: Crinoidea: INFORMATION
    the ambulacral groove of a ray toward the mouth Modified ossicles called lappets that border the ambulacral groove function to close off the groove and prevent damage to the tube feet The rays of crinoids are also important for locomotion By moving their rays up and down through contraction and relaxation of muscles crinoids are able to swim slowly through the water A crinoid s internal anatomy is dominated by organs for digestion and reproduction The entire digestive system lies within the calyx and is characterized by little more than a mouth and intestine with diverticula The coelom extends into the rays where the gonads are located Nerves occur throughout the animal but the mass found in the calyx seems to be the center for regeneration of lost body parts Excretion may be accomplished through small tubes called saccules located near the ambulacral grooves but the mechanism for this is poorly understood Crinoids are gonochoric and brood their young until the embryo develops into a doliolarian larva or a fully formed juvenile crinoid All but one of the 9 11 subclasses of crinoids are now extinct and are known only through their sometimes spectacular fossils Approximately 5 000 species of fossil crinoids are known with the greatest diversity from the Paleozoic By the end of the Permian however only one lineage seems to have survived The only surviving subclass of crinoids is the Articulata Although crinoids are sometimes amazingly abundant they appear to have little commercial impact and hardly affect humans in any way References Hess H W I Ausich C E Brett M J Simms 1999 Fossil Crinoids Cambridge University Press Kolzoff E N 1990 Invertebrates Sauders College Publishing Mladenov P V and Chia F S 1983 Development settling behavior metamorphosis and pentacrinoid feeding and growth of the feather

    Original URL path: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Crinoidea/ (2014-06-21)
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