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  • Contact Us — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    3983 Fax 919 962 5206 For point to point directions go to Google Maps From Interstate 40 from Raleigh and points east Take Exit 273 B Hwy 54 towards Chapel Hill Continue straight for 4 miles to the top of the hill Turn right onto Country Club Road From I 40 East towards Raleigh Take Exit 273 and turn right at the end of the exit ramp Continue straight for 4 miles to the top of the hill Turn right onto Country Club Road I 85 to Intersection with Hwy 15 501 South Follow 15 501 South towards Chapel Hill the highway will divide Remain on 15 501 South Bypass bearing left away from Franklin Street Turn right at Highway 54 Exit towards UNC Chapel Hill Continue to the top of the hill Turn right onto Country Club Road Visitor Parking Visitor parking is also available on campus at the Morehead Planetarium Metered spaces are available on Franklin Street Public pay lots are located on Rosemary Street one block north and parallel to Franklin Street UNC Campus Parking Parking facilities dedicated to visitor and patient parking are located throughout the UNC campus http move unc edu parking visitor parking Downtown Parking map and information from www parkonthehill com Support DCRP The Department of City and Regional Planning depends on the generous gifts of our friends and alumni Private gifts sustain and enhance the department s mission of teaching research and service Your contributions help us provide the best possible education for our undergraduate and graduate students build a lively intellectual community and support the innovative work of our faculty The department receives tax deductible donations through the Arts and Sciences Foundation at UNC Chapel Hill Please note in the memo section of your check that your gift is intended for

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/contact-us (2015-06-03)
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  • Support DCRP — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Planning depends on the generous gifts of our friends and alumni Private gifts sustain and enhance the department s mission of teaching research and service Your contributions help us provide the best possible education for our undergraduate and graduate students build a lively intellectual community and support the innovative work of our faculty The faculty and students in the Department of City and Regional Planning thank everyone whose gifts support our daily work Online giving to the Department of City and Regional Planning is easy and secure Simply follow this link to make your gift Make an Online Gift Now Mail in donations The department receives tax deductible donations through the Arts and Sciences Foundation at UNC Chapel Hill Please note in the memo section of your check that your gift is intended for the Department of City and Regional Planning Donations should be sent to the following address UNC Arts Sciences Foundation 134 East Franklin Street CB 6115 Chapel Hill NC 27599 6115 For additional information about giving opportunities within the Department of City and Regional Planning please contact Ronda Manuel Associate Director of Development with the Arts and Sciences Foundation at 919 962 7266 or by email at

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/giving (2015-06-03)
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  • Natural Hazards Resilience Certificate Program — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    the threats and impacts of natural hazards and disasters on human settlements including those exacerbated by climate change and how individuals organizations communities and larger systems of governance prepare for respond to mitigate against recover from and adapt to these events Emphasis is placed on the concept of disaster resilience or the ability to prepare and plan for absorb recover from and more successfully adapt to adverse events National Research Council 2012 The curriculum provides students with an academic and practice based exposure to the science underlying our understanding of natural hazards phenomena and a critical analysis of the policies programs and plans in place that are intended to help societies manage the effects of natural hazards and disasters to include an emphasis on those actions that increase disaster resilience The certificate program serves enrolled graduate students only and is not available to practicing professionals located outside the university Educational Objectives 1 Provide students with the knowledge and experience needed to actively contribute to the study and or the practice of natural hazards and disaster resilience More specifically the certificate will produce well trained researchers and practitioners who can help the public non profit and private sectors become more resilient in the face of natural hazards and disasters and adapt to the effects of a changing climate 2 Attract and teach the next generation of natural hazards and disaster management scholars that are more reflective of the general population In the case of disaster management for instance the field is less diverse than the general population while those who study and engage in the practice of climate change adaptation comprise a relatively new cohort that is in need of additional scholars and policymakers As such the certificate program strives to be inclusive as reflected in participation by underrepresented minorities women

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/nhrcp (2015-06-03)
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  • Planning for the New Economy — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    many cases of cities and regions stretching the boundaries of traditional jobs and revenue focused economic development to include placemaking transportation culture and livability This growing understanding of what makes a place prosperous is exciting news in the field of planning and we hope that the articles in this issue encourage readers to think broadly and creatively about the new economic development strategies that might serve their communities Finally readers will notice that many of the authors conceive of equity as a primary goal of economic development rather than an optional and inferior item on the development checklist Many of the articles featured talk about sharing prosperity creating more and better jobs and building wealth and opportunity across our communities We are inspired by the work being done to improve quality of life for all and hope that readers take away some strategies for incorporating equity as a key feature of their own economic development plans Editors Cara Wittekind and Julia Barnard A digital version of this edition will be available late in 2015 Until then please visit the Subscriptions tab to order a copy http carolinaplanning unc edu subscriptions PLANNING FOR INCLUSIVE PROSPERITY LESSONS FROM THE NORTH CAROLINA EXPERIENCE Nichola Lowe Meenu Tewari T William Lester Professors of Economic Development at the UNC Chapel Hill Department of City and Regional Planning set the stage by presenting the concept of inclusive prosperity as the economic development goal of the new economy FROM CONCENTRATED POVERTY TO COMMUNITY WEALTH BUILDING Thad Williamson Lessons from ongoing comprehensive poverty reduction and community wealth building work taking place in Richmond Va BAY AREA BLUEPRINT WORKER COOPERATIVES AS A COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Alison Lingane Continuing the theme of equity and inclusivity the co founder of Project Equity in Oakland Calif makes an argument for worker

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/carplan15 (2015-06-03)
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  • DCRP Workshop: LRT Station Area Affordable Housing Study — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    within a ½ mile of future rail transit stations be affordable to those making 60 percent or less of the area median income AMI A major focus of the discussion leading up to passage of the resolution was the need for land banking or the purchase and set aside of land for future development of affordable housing DCRP students led by Dr Emil Malizia determined if there are parcels already under the ownership of either the City or the County within future rail transit areas that could potentially be used for future affordable housing development They were tasked with determining land characteristics that are optimal for development of affordable housing To do this they conducted a literature review as well as numerous interviews with local developers Once the criteria were established an analysis was performed to rate parcels owned by City or County against the criteria to determine potential suitability for affordable housing development Planning Workshops enable graduate students to apply skills attained in the Master of City Regional Planning Program and to provide services to public and non profit clients the state and its communities In the spring semester of 2015 the Workshop participants conducted qualitative and quantitative research

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/workshop-affordable-transit (2015-06-03)
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  • Sustaining Places: Best Practices for Comprehensive Plans — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Plan a 2012 guide that makes the case for building sustainability into long range planning Now APA has gone further explaining how to put those plans in place Sustaining Places Best Practices for Comprehensive Plans offers six principles for creating livable healthy communities in harmony with nature communities that have resilient economies social equity and strong regional ties Four steps show how to turn those principles into a plan and score the results Insights from 10 pilot communities add the real world perspectives of big cities small towns and everything in between This report is not a recipe It s a resource with principles processes and pointers communities can use to forge their own solutions as they meet the greatest planning challenge of our time Read the Executive Summary pdf About the Author David R Godschalk faicp is emeritus professor of city and regional planning at the University of North Carolina as well as an author and occasional consultant on comprehensive plans His most recent books are Sustainable Development Projects Integrating Design Development and Regulation and The Dynamic Decade Creating the Sustainable Campus for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 2001 2011 He led the Sustaining Places Task

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/sustain-best-pract-plans (2015-06-03)
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  • Study Looks to Locals on Saltwater Intrusion — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    re also investigating how the area s residents will play a role in conserving their natural resources or not There are a few reasons why saltwater is moving into areas that have never dealt with it before say the researchers First there is the general rise of the sea level On land as flat as this peninsula s any increase in sea level will bring the salty tides farther inland Then there are the surges from coastal storms that flood the land with seawater Then drought factors in too When rainfall is sparse the concentration of salt in brackish waters increases Todd Bendor one of the principal investigators says The project is about trying to help people understand where the risks are going to be in the future and then once we understand those risks we can do something about it The assumption Bendor says is that we re all at the behest of rising sea level but there s a lot of things from an engineering perspective and a land management perspective that we can do that curtails it His role in the research project is to talk with people about how they might react to saltier landscapes or at least what they say they d do in different scenarios It matters how people are willing to adapt or willing to fight against what may be kind of a permanent change in the landscape he says The Albemarle Pamlico peninsula can expect more saltwater intrusion he says This is going to happen So it s not an if necessarily it s just a when Budgeting for future action is something he says that is uncharted territory for land managers homeowners and farmers People are changing the landscape and I think that it s not just sea level is going

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/ltlsaltwater (2015-06-03)
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  • Housing Choice Voucher Survey of Satisfaction and Needs — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    in the Charlotte Housing Authority s CHA primary voucher program The federal Housing Choice Voucher HCV program also known as Section 8 allows low income households to find their own modestly priced rental housing on the private market as an alternative to living in public housing developments Researchers at the UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies reached out to more than 1 000 randomly selected Section 8 households in 2014 resulting in a response rate greater than 66 percent to assess the household characteristics levels of satisfaction service needs and work efforts of those participating in the Charlotte Housing Authority s CHA primary voucher program The research team led by DCRP faculty member Bill Rohe found respondents had high levels of satisfaction with CHA management and the HCV specialists and also reported high levels of satisfaction with their landlords housing units and neighborhood Read the full report http bit ly 1ALQ1wV The report presents several recommendations to improve services to HCV recipients including Expand family self sufficiency programming to more HCV recipients to help improve employment rates among Section 8 residents Expand mental health awareness and treatment options to help HCV recipients 48 of respondents met CES D criteria

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/housing-choice-voucher-survey (2015-06-03)
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