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  • Dense Development Would Harm Air in NC’s Triangle, Study Finds — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    a different conclusion They argue that if the Triangle had been more densely developed in 2010 65 people would have died from breathing particulate matter In comparison a model of pollution in the Triangle found 47 people likely died as a result of breathing particulates in that year A very sprawled development on the other hand would slightly increase regional levels of particulate matter But because the pollution would be more dispersed over a wider area only an estimated 31 people would die from breathing pollutants compared to the model of the actual Triangle in 2010 the study found A novel trio of models To reach their conclusion the researchers relied on a system of modeling that they believe is the first of its kind First the researchers modeled three scenarios the density of the actual Triangle in 2010 a more compact dense version of that base scenario and a sprawling version of the base scenario The researchers then modeled likely traffic patterns for each which they used to predict air pollution Finally the researchers funneled this information into a health model which estimated the resulting human health effects This linking together of public health and urban planning is relatively rare despite the two fields shared history Rodriguez said Urban planning emerged from urban health issues he said Back in the late 1800s an understanding of access to water as a source of potential cholera in London led to the first sort of GIS urban maps and zoning But while the two fields were intertwined that began to change in the 1930s and 40s as public health research focused more on individuals health and city planners focused more on landscape architecture and urban design Only since the 1990s have the two begun to overlap again Rodriguez said Still planners tend mainly to consider the environmental effects of a development say the effect a shopping mall will have on nearby wetlands They often don t consider the effects their projects will have on human health using the concept of formal health impact assessments Rodriguez said Yet as the two fields public health and urban planning increasingly overlap that may need to change according to the researchers The need for a menu of policies Theodore Mansfield the study s lead author and a DCRP Ph D student at UNC said there s an important discussion to be had about the costs and benefits of city living There are a lot of great things that cities do he said But at the same time the concentration of all those activities in a small space can have some negative health impacts Density offers many benefits like an increased ability to provide mass transit Rodriguez added But it isn t necessarily a boon for public health We need to have a menu of policies that are complementary and synergistic he said Those might include car free zones in urban centers a popular feature in Scandinavian cities and electrified public transit he said The study authors

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/harm-from-dense-devel (2015-06-03)
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  • Like Carolina Planning on Facebbok — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    alumni visits Founded in 1946 the Department of City and Regional Planning is one of the largest oldest and best known programs of graduate planning education and research in North America Like us on Facebook https www facebook com CarolinaPlanning to stay engaged with our faculty alumni students and other friends of DCRP Alumni Visits It s actually quite surprising how often we see alumni in New East Our students really enjoy their visits and the real world experience they bring to the classroom Like us on Facebook to see who visits Research and Teaching Faculty and students at DCRP carry out an extensive body of research and engage in a variety of projects working with local communities and clients Research is carried out at our own research centers as well as through partnerships with academic governmental business and non profit organizations Students in the department are also active participants in community based planning workshop courses in which they engage directly with local community groups Like us on Facebook to learn more about our workshop courses and latest faculty research Student life Whether you are an alum remembering the good old days or a prospective student wanting to see what

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/like-us (2015-06-03)
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  • The State of Low-Wage Work in N.C. — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    minority and less educated than non low wage workers They are also more likely to be an immigrant These disparities both reflect and contribute to other socioeconomic inequalities Explore this section to examine in detail who is most impacted by low wage work Read more Industries In order to understand the state of low wage work in North Carolina it is vital to examine the industries that are creating and maintaining these low paying jobs The first step is identifying low wage industries to show the basic low wage landscape the industries are mostly service providing but range from restaurants to leisure to health care Next we explore trends in employment numbers and wages for the past 20 years The wage trends are helpful in showing which industries have changed from non low wage to low wage and to see the near universal trend of falling or stagnant wages The employment numbers show us that growth has been most rapid in some of the lowest paying industries which points to an increasing low wage workforce in the future Read more Geography In looking at the spatial patterns of low wage work in North Carolina we aimed to highlight the counties most impacted by low wage employment in order to identify regional trends or differences between urban and rural counties Various lenses are needed to understand geographical trends in low wage work so we looked at four characteristics Read more Minimum Wage Policy North Carolina s minimum wage is 7 25 an hour an amount which translated to a full year of work 15 080 would only net 129 of the federal poverty line for an individual However if that individual were the sole earner for a family of two then that family would be living below the federal poverty line

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/low-wage-work-in-nc (2015-06-03)
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  • DCRP workshop helps UNC earn bike friendly award — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Through application workshop courses DCRP faculty and students work collaboratively with North Carolina clients to specify the class projects to be undertaken Over the course of the semester students combine creativity and technical capabilities to produce plans strategies or recommendations for community improvement The workshop students included Michael Clark Ann McGrane Jill Mead John Perry Bryan Poole and Le Zhang With its Silver award designation UNC joins a cutting edge group of colleges and universities from across the United States transforming their campuses and the communities around them There are now a total of 100 BFUs in 37 states and Washington D C Campus leaders are recognizing the immediate and long term impact that a vibrant bike culture can create for their institutions said Andy Clarke President of the League of American Bicyclists We applaud this new round of colleges and universities for investing in a more sustainable future for the country and a healthier lifestyle for their staff students and surrounding communities Colleges and university campuses are unique environments for their high density stimulating atmosphere and defined boundaries These factors make them ideal environments to incorporate bikes Many colleges and universities have built upon these good conditions and embraced

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/silver-bike (2015-06-03)
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  • Coastal SEES Collaborative Research — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    will accomplish the 3 primary goals of NSF Coastal SEES First the project will provide a comprehensive toolset to enable place based system level understanding of coastal systems at multiple spatial and temporal scales Second it will yield outcomes with predictive value in coastal systems that are easily understood by stakeholders while representing complex interactions between climate hydrology land use and ecological processes Third by focusing on how information influences individual preferences the project will identify pathways by which outcomes could be used to enhance coastal sustainability Together these activities will help guide sustainable management of this region and similarly affected regions over the next several decades to centuries Technical Description This project will bring together investigators from four major NC universities NCSU Duke UNC ECU and four disciplines hydrology biogeochemistry community ecology regional planning working to integrate social hydrological climate and ecological data into model scenarios to examine not only how human decisions affect ecosystems but also how information about those ecological impacts in turn affect human decisions This project will facilitate development validation and refinement of a saltwater intrusion vulnerability index SIVI for the Albemarle Pamlico peninsula of North Carolina that accounts for physical environmental processes influencing the movement of water and solutes across the landscape as well as the extensive networks of canals ditches roads and pump stations that fundamentally alter the flow of water across the region The index will be used along with extensive and repeated ground based surveys of surface water soil and vegetation conditions across a range of vulnerable landscapes within the region to better understand ecological impacts of saltwater intrusion Through workshops and surveys for landowners managers and other stakeholders in the region the project will reveal the likely impact of land use decisions on saltwater intrusion under scenarios of climate change

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/sees (2015-06-03)
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  • Impact of the Safe Routes to School Program on Walking and Bicycling — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    many who study active transportation have long known Safe Routes to Schoo l programs increase rates of walking and bicycling to and from school Problem research strategy and findings Increasing walking and bicycling to school has been a national policy goal since Congress created the Safe Routes to School SRTS program While previous research has suggested positive program impacts there have been no large scale studies with strong research designs Here we study 801 schools in the District of Columbia Florida Oregon and Texas to assess how the proportion of students walking and bicycling to school changed after the introduction of SRTS programs By including schools with and without SRTS programs and analyzing data collected over time 2007 2012 we are able to distinguish SRTS impacts from secular trends We find increases in walking and bicycling after schools implemented SRTS programs Engineering improvements are associated with an 18 relative increase in walking and bicycling and the effects of education and encouragement programs are cumulative Over the course of five years these education and encouragement programs could lead to a 25 relative increase in walking and bicycling Takeaway for practice Planners should work to prioritize capital improvements that improve non motorized

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/safe-routes-impact (2015-06-03)
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  • Noreen McDonald — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Methods PLAN 739 Transportation Modeling PLAN 823 Workshop Research and Practice Bike Planning at UNC Chapel Hill Research My research highlights connections between transportation education and health policy My work has documented sharp declines in walking to school and a commensurate rise in driving between 1969 and 2009 Half of the decline in walking to school between 1969 and 2001 is attributable to increases in the distance to school and the remainder to changing attitudes and demographics My research explores both pathways by examining how school siting policies and household attitudes to convenience and safety have impacted the rise in driving to school I m currently working on several projects including investigating how early travel influences later behavior by analyzing longitudinal data on teenagers analyzing the travel of young adults i e the millennial generation to understand the potential transport and energy impacts assessing the multi modal costs of school transportation Selected Publications Complete list of publications McDonald N R Steiner C Lee T Rhoulac Smith X Zhu Y Yang In Press Impact of the Safe Routes to School Program on Walking and Bicycling Journal of the American Planning Association 80 2 153 167 Request Article McDonald N D Salvesen R Kuhlman T Combs 2014 The Impact of Changes in State Minimum Acreage Policies on School Siting Practices Journal of Planning Education and Research 34 2 169 179 Request Article McDonald N P Barth R Steiner 2013 Assessing the Distribution of Safe Routes to School Program Funds 2005 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine 45 4 401 406 Request Article McDonald N Y Yang S Abbott A Bullock 2013 Impact of the Safe routes to School Program on Walking and Biking Eugene Oregon Study Transport Policy 29 243 248 Request Article McDonald N A Brown L Marchetti and M Pedroso

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/people/faculty/noreenmcdonald (2015-06-03)
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  • The New Climate Economy — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    for growth DCRP Associate Professor Meenu Tewari was involved with this project over the last six months as part of the Cities Workstream project She also wrote a background paper and led the Cities work for the India country case study all of which will be released later this year The New Climate Economy Building better more productive cities can boost economic prosperity and help tackle climate change On current trends fewer than 500 cities in three key groups Emerging Cities Global Megacities and Mature Cities will account for over 60 of global income growth and half of energy related greenhouse gas emissions growth between now and 2030 Action in these cities particularly Emerging Cities will have disproportionate benefits for the global economy and climate The world is now experiencing a new different type of urbanization http newclimateeconomy report overview Cities can follow a different growth pathway to unlock a new wave of urban productivity This alternative approach should be based on boosting resource productivity to improve the efficiency of energy use and resilience to energy price volatility And it would involve a broader shift to more compact connected and coordinated urban growth In much of the world urban growth

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/climate-econ (2015-06-03)
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