archive-edu.com » EDU » U » UNC.EDU

Total: 552

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Guiding China’s Gilded Age: Helping a giant rethink its urban upheaval — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    course Shenzhen turned into a manufacturing supercity as did dozens of former small cities And Beijing became one of the most congested and polluted cities in the world This past winter the level of pollution in the capital city was 25 times higher than what s considered safe and 29 other Chinese cities were enshrouded in a gray haze of smog so dense that it stung the eyes That s just the air Rivers are open cesspools Song says And some lakes are so polluted that algae blooms have turned the water into a green toxic sludge that s endangering drinking water for millions of people These are some of the unintended consequences of China s urbanization which shows no sign of slowing In 1980 according to China s National Bureau of Statistics about 20 percent of China s population lived in cities In 2007 it was 42 percent In 2012 it was 51 percent The bureau projects that by 2020 60 percent of China s population will live in cities As this transformation was taking place Song joined UNC in 2003 as an assistant professor and continued to consult with Chinese planners In 2009 she started UNC s Program on Chinese Cities to provide research training and education to Chinese planners and leaders who are open to better planning practices She formed a consortium between UNC and Beijing University to bring Carolina scholars to China apply for grants and work on urban planning projects together Song also wrote research papers and books including Smart Urban Growth for China 2009 in which she documents how China s urban planning process laid the foundation for economic growth She also notes China s curious development patterns including highways and coal plants built in environmentally sensitive areas a lack of mixed use development and inefficient land use practices such as sprawling educational campuses and cramped residential complexes One cause of such problems according to Song is China s planning bureaucracy Several planning agencies at various levels of government are responsible for developing different parts of cities and Song found that those plans are often poorly coordinated In Beijing development plans resulted in a sprawling city with wide roads encouraging more car use In Shenzhen a new subway station was put in a wealthy low density residential area because that s where influential planners and rich residents wanted it That station should ve been built in a medium to low income area Song says where a lot of people live and use trains Those sorts of local development shenanigans still plague China as they do many other countries including the United States even as planners try to back China out of the uber urbanization corner Still Song sees positive signs in China partly because its communist party is starting to change the way it does business When China began modernizing Song says local and provincial political leaders knew they could rise through the ranks of China s lone political party based largely on how

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/giantrethink (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Events Calendar — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Support DCRP Home About DCRP DCRP Events Calendar Search Site only in current section Navigation Department History New East Diversity DCRP Events Calendar Job Opportunities GIS Resources Text Increase font size Decrease font size Info Events Calendar Keep track of what s going on at DCRP Document Actions Send this Print this The Department of City and Regional Planning New East Building CB 3140 UNC CH Chapel Hill NC 27599

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/department-resources/calendar (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Planning, With Partners — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    employment how can we achieve sustainability without causing an economic disaster for thousands of workers Despite the tension between some sustainability struggles and economic development these two fields are strongest together The sessions I attended on Saturday illustrated several ways in which economic development planners can both learn from and contribute to conversations surrounding environmental challenges In the morning I attended a session titled Complete Neighborhood Strategies for Affordable Housing Architect and planner Doug Farr current chair of the Congress for New Urbanism urged affordable housing advocates to forge partnerships and coalitions with sustainability groups He mentioned that in order to achieve the highest level of LEED certification one must provide certain levels of walkability and affordable housing provision In this example advocates for affordable housing can find partners in architects and urban designers and can simultaneously achieve their economic development goals and move communities toward lower energy usage Further economic development planners can advance sustainability goals by pushing for projects that are transit oriented walkable and energy efficient In another session today on achieving the triple bottom line i e gains in the social economic and environmental realms the speakers discussed the importance of considering all three goals in decision making processes It is of course possible to rely too heavily on criteria of economic cost and financial benefit alone Many of our economic development tools such as IMPLAN and cost benefit analysis make this all too easy to do when they are used exclusively Instead we must use tools that incorporate social and environmental costs and benefits in order to fully grasp the desirability of a planning project These examples show how coalitions of those interested in justice economic development and sustainability can be more effective at achieving each goal than any one group alone Jane Jacobs s

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/planning-partners (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Expanding access to water and sanitation in India — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    to the existing pipeline This makes for a more seasonal distribution of water loans especially in rural areas as water authorities do not tend to issue water permits during the dry season when water supplies are lower Moreover loans for infrastructure are a harder sell in places that are frequently ravaged by cyclones and flooding as is the case in coastal Odisha despite desperate need In the case of urban slums connecting to the water network is often a two step process The local water authority has to first agree to lay pipelines that connect a slum to the official water supply and then carry out their promise before local residents can actually lay pipelines that connect their homes to the water network One organization that we work with in urban Hyderabad has been incredibly successful in convincing the local authorities to connect various slums However you can easily imagine that these successes occur over periods of time not overnight In addition political regulations in India restrict the activities local governments can take in terms of laying pipelines around elections lest it be interpreted as buying votes Thus timing is critical Issues of land ownership and title play a large role in our work Understandably people are very unlikely to put themselves into debt to build infrastructure on property that they do not own In rural areas I see this playing out when there are land ownership disputes between family members in urban areas this obviously impacts our work in informal settlements slums In one particular slum in Hyderabad the work of our partner organization actually led to slum residents only getting piped water for the first time but also getting deeds to their land issued as a prerequisite to the piped connections This was an unanticipated but warmly welcomed

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/watersanitationinindia (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Department of City and Regional Planning — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    prevalence of low wage work has profound impacts on the capabilities of workers to sustain their families Yet the impact of low wage work radiates well beyond the person who is employed or the employer to several different segments of an economic ecosystem read more DCRP workshop helps UNC earn bike friendly award The League of American Bicyclists has designated UNC at Chapel Hill as a Silver Level Bike Friendly University The Bicycle Friendly University BFU program recognizes institutions of higher education for promoting and providing a more bike able campus for students staff and visitors read more Coastal SEES Collaborative Research Climate change is transforming the outer edge of the Southern US coastal plain Lower lying parts of this region characterized by extensive freshwater dependent ecosystems will be largely inundated by gradual sea level rise by the end of this century read more Impact of the Safe Routes to School Program on Walking and Bicycling A new study by DCRP Professor Noreen McDonald confirms Safe Routes to Schoo l programs increase rates of walking and bicycling to and from school read more The New Climate Economy The New Climate Economy a report that was just released by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate that looks at the conditions under which climate security can be good for growth read more Why haven t China s cities learned from America s mistakes Faceless estates Sprawling suburbs Soulless financial districts Discredited elsewhere as fostering the worst kind of urban angst these are the vogue in China but change could be afoot read more A Planning Life Bridging Academics and Practice Half a century of life as a planner Is there any framework capable of capturing the high and low points of that experience Looking back at a life as a planner educator Dr Godschalk sees many positive signs that three main concepts not only continue to shape the field of planning in fundamental ways but are gaining steam read more How Much Does it Really Cost to Get Students to School While the first thing that might come to mind is the expense of each trip including the purchasing and fueling school buses and paying for drivers many other factors influence the cost of school transportation especially when all modes of travel are considered read more Land value impacts of wetland restoration As restoration efforts proliferate it is important to know what impact if any large scale wetland and stream restoration have on surrounding land values Restoration effects on real estate values have substantial implications for protecting resources increasing tax base and improving environmental policies read more Ripple effect Asheville s shortage of affordable housing Asheville s city government is pushing to increase the supply of affordable housing Late last year city staff commissioned DCRP s Mai Nguyen to compare their efforts to provide more affordable housing with what other similar municipalities have done read more Global Heels Hou Xin visiting scholar in the Program on Chinese Cities HOU Xin

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/about-the-department/sendto_form (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Home Search Site only in current section Text Increase font size Decrease font size Info Did you not find what you were looking for Try the Advanced Search to refine your search Search results 0 items matching your search terms Subscribe to an always updated feed of these search terms No results were found The Department of City and Regional Planning New East Building CB 3140 UNC CH Chapel Hill

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/search (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Financial Assistance — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    can be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Student Aid Campus Box 2300 Vance Hall UNC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill NC 27599 2300 or call 919 962 8396 The FAFSA is also available from most college and university financial aid offices Awards made through the department Department of City and Regional Planning Assistantships and Fellowships for masters students provide up to 11 100 to incoming students with outstanding undergraduate records and the potential for making significant contributions to the planning profession Doctoral Assistantships and Fellowships provide up to 18 000 in financial support for each Ph D student admitted to the department The department s policy is to provide this support to doctoral students for the first two years of study after which virtually every student retains financial support by working with a faculty adviser on a sponsored research project or by teaching The following examples indicate some of the financial aid opportunities John A Parker Fellowship funded by the John A Parker Trust was created by alumni and friends of the department in honor of its founder and first chairman John A Parker An award of up to 10 000 is made to a second year student with high potential for contribution to the department The Louise Venable Coker Prize is a 200 cash award presented for the most outstanding Masters Project completed by a second year student in the department awarded at graduation Robert E Stipe Assistantship in Historic Preservation provides 10 000 in support to a student with career interests in historic preservation and its application to land use planning urban revitalization or real estate development Transportation Management Internships jointly sponsored by the North Carolina State Department of Transportation and local transportation operators provides work and learning opportunities Interns receive a stipend for the academic year and a salary for summer work Graduate Teaching and Research Assistantships provided through state funds as well as through research grants and contracts to the Center for Urban and Regional Studies and Institute for Economic Development pay up to 11 100 per year Students who are awarded departmental teaching research assistantships may be recommended for a special tuition rate as part of the award package The special tuition rate enables out of state students who will be performing specified assistantship duties to pay similar tuition to that of resident students In state tuition awards are also available University Awards Graduate School Fellowships pay up to 22 000 for the academic year plus tuition benefits Graduate School Merit Assistantships pay up to 18 000 for the academic year plus tuition benefits Awards made by outside agencies A number of governmental agencies and nonprofit organizations provide internships for planning students during the academic year and summer An example of such an award is the Downtown Housing Improvement Corporation of Raleigh N C which provides an internship during the academic year and summer employment with the corporation working on nonprofit housing programs and projects Another example is the U S Department of Housing

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/admissions/financialassistance (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Global Heels: Reem Ghunaim — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    course at UNC have you enjoyed the most and why I have really enjoyed the economic development seminar PL 773 taught by Meenu Tewari associate professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning She helped me see the bigger picture and learn about economic theories how they are interconnected and how they affect us I liked the fact that her class does not just focus on theory alone It is a powerful course Meenu Tewari is smart knowledgeable and capable The discussion is based on principle and not emotion It helped me view things in a mature more scientific way and I could based on that contribute better Tell us about a professor who has motivated you or helped you Again Meenu Tewari is a good friend and she is also my advisor When I first came here she helped me to understand how to adjust to school She told me how to study She was approachable for help I also appreciate that she teaches using theory but she is also practical She considers the different perspectives She is aware of what is going on outside the United States in the world She understands that knowledge is interactive She is able to think across fields That s really unique I literally listen to every word she says because every word is valuable See more at http global unc edu news global heels reem ghunaim palestinian territory sthash IY0w7fOB dpuf R eem Ghunaim is studying city and regional planning in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences She is specializing in economic development She will graduate in May 2014 with a master s degree in urban planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill She will also earn an international development certificate plus a certificate from Duke in conflict resolution and international peace as part of her Rotary Peace Fellowship with the Duke UNC Rotary Center for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution Where are you from and what is your country known for I am from the Palestinian Territory which is not a country yet We are in Israel occupied Palestine The Palestinian Territory is probably best known for all of those related tensions One of the nice things it is known for is that it is considered the home of Jesus Christ which is Bethlehem The Church of the Nativity located at the birthplace of Jesus Christ is in Palestine The Jewish Christian and Muslim communities live there together The conflict is political and not religious which is not really being conveyed internationally What languages do you speak I speak Arabic and English and I know the basics of French and Hebrew Why did you choose to study in the United States And why at UNC I was coming from an area of conflict where the U S was part of the conflict and I wanted to understand the U S context I also wanted to be exposed to another culture I made some American

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/reem-pt (2015-06-03)
    Open archived version from archive



  •