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  • Regaining Relevancy — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    The perceived trivialization of the planning profession originates in large part from a loss of professional identity authority and vision beginning with democratic reform movements in the 1960s and 1970s Many argue that rather than formulators and implementers of forward thinking plans the profession is now reduced to administering code and facilitating process Others contend that the field s redefined role gives it new legitimacy to tackle to pressing challenges of the 21st century This issue of Carolina Planning explores the relevancy and role of the planning profession through a rich array of analyses case studies and commentary The theme for this issue was inspired by UNC Chapel Hill planning Professor Thomas J Campanella who captured the aforementioned zeitgeist of the field last summer in his powerful essay entitled Jane Jacobs and the Death and Life of American Planning No longer capable of bringing about more just sustainable healthful efficient and beautiful cities he argues that the blame for the current state of the planning field rests squarely at the feet of Jane Jacobs and her contemporaries Campanella identifies three products of this adverse legacy a the abandonment of physical design as the disciplinary center of the planning field b

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/carplan37 (2015-06-03)
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  • 2012 DCRP Graduation Ceremony — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Student Student Awards pictured left to right Travis Green Kyle Vangel Anisha Steephen Micah Kordsmeier Outstanding Class Contributions Weiss Best Colleague Award Travis Green Louise Venable Coker Award for Best Masters Project Kyle Vangel N C Chapter of the APA Outstanding Student Award Anisha Steephen American Institute of Certified Planners Outstanding Student Award Micah Kordsmeier Additional accomplishments also noted Co Editor of Carolina Planning David Daddio Planners Forum Co Presidents Theodora Hadjimichael and Uri Pachter NC APA Student Representative Daniel Brookshire GPSF Representative Anisha Steephen MCRP Graduates Christopher Michael Allison Catherine Therese Bartels Brennan Bouma Daniel Gaston Brookshire Michael Seth Chasnow MCRP MBA Juneho Chung Rotary Scholar Harley Elisabeth Cooper Terra May Curtis David William Daddio Maire A Dekle Katrina Adrianna Sadnytzky Durbak Travis Maverick Green Theodora Hadjimichael Lindsay Ann Herendeen MCRP MPH Vivian Jaynes Jason Kajer Micah Lohr Kordsmeier Heather Lynn Morris Arta Osmanaj Amanda Mansfield Theodore James Mansfield MCRP MSEE Rachel Beth Meyerson MCRP MPA Vincent Monaco MCRP MBA Barron Scot Monroe II MCRP MPA Uri Ayal Pachter Edward Ryan Parzick Karla Rosenberg MCRP MSW Chrishaun Smith Anisha Steephen Matthew Burke Tomasulo MCRP MLA Clara Jalaine McCoy Turner Kyle Joseph Vangel Lauren Eva Gray Wang Matthew Casey Weissman

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/2012graduation (2015-06-03)
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  • DCRP Workshop: Carteret County 2030 — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    which may be impacted by storm surge and sea level rise as well as shifts in military investment tourism development and worldwide supply chain logistics In light of these findings students identified growth drivers to help local planners and policymakers conceptualize these externally imposed forces transportation and port investments military expansion and tourism investment The class then applied this framework to develop the following three alternative futures for the County Cooperation Drives Success Carteret County booms as improvements to Highway 70 facilitate travel to the rapidly growing Research Triangle area Recognizing the immense opportunities and challenges associated with this growth key regional stakeholders including local governments the military tourism interests port operators and environmental advocates come together and proactively develop strategies to deal with growth pressures Tourist Trap Carteret County experiences rapid population and housing growth as improvements to Highway 70 facilitate travel to the Research Triangle Area In the face of this growth regional stakeholders are unable to come to an agreement on how to best manage growth in a way that enhances the County s sustainability and prosperity Second home construction becomes the dominant industry and development sprawls into marginal areas and hinders military operations External Forces Dominate Increasing global integration and geopolitical pressures lead Carteret County to become a key center of shipping logistics and military operations training and mobilization A number of defense related businesses spring up along the corridor between Carteret and Craven Counties Moreover a multimillion dollar expansion at the Port of Morehead City and improved highway access make Carteret particularly attractive to logistics businesses Using these narratives students then mapped these growth scenarios leveraging land suitability analysis current infrastructure and development patterns and broad county level designations of areas of development The location and amount of growth depicted in the maps reflect both

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/planiteast (2015-06-03)
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  • CURS releases North Carolina’s Distressed Urban Tracts: A View of the State’s Economically Disadvantaged Communities — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    s Economically Disadvantaged Communities Search Site only in current section Text Increase font size Decrease font size Info Send this page to someone Fill in the email address of your friend and we will send an email that contains a link to this page Address info Send to Required The e mail address to send this link to From Required Your email address Comment A comment about this link The

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/distressedurbantracts/sendto_form (2015-06-03)
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  • Planners explain failure of housing bonus policy — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    learned the extra income from the low cost units won t offset the extra costs they incur by including them The developer is going to lose money on that hence the lack of interest Planning Supervisor Aaron Cain said With help from two UNC city and regional planning students Melissa Kim and John Perry Durham planners tried to gauge how well similar density bonus programs have worked in other cities Their checks found that most failed Those that didn t generally offered developers a chance to build at least two extra market rate dwellings for every low cost dwelling a project includes There also were some communities Carrboro being one that keep a tight rein on permit approvals and use that as leverage in bargaining for low cost units with developers But that approach isn t necessarily feasible in a community the size of Durham Kim told City Council members and County Commissioners who sit on the Joint City County Planning Committee Over time you d have hundreds of developments coming through that elected officials would have to review a process that is both riskier and more costly for developers she said Successful bonus programs generally include concessions that go beyond density Perry said going on to list the loosening of height restrictions and parking requirements as things some communities offer And he said all these programs operate under administrative review where in exchange for offering low cost units developers can avoid entanglements with elected officials and neighborhood groups Committee members termed the research helpful and gave planners the green light to try figuring out if there s some package of concessions Durham s governments can offer that might work Assistant Planning Director Pat Young said the department will organize a group with help from people like former City Councilwoman

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/housingbonuspolicy (2015-06-03)
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  • Last day of classes — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Last day of classes Last day of classes boy the semester went by fast Good luck with your exams Group presentation day in Tony Sease s Project and Site Planning class PLAN 752 Project and Site Planning 3 Techniques of site analysis project programming and arrangement of structures on the land Workshop covering design and review of urban development projects within limitations of regulatory standards and market criteria Document Actions

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/lastclassday (2015-06-03)
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  • 2013 Chester Rapkin award announced by JPER — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Volume 32 2012 calendar year of JPER was awarded to DCRP s T William Lester for his article titled Labor Standards and Local Economic Development Do Living Wage Provisions Harm Economic Growth Vol 32 issue 3 http jpe sagepub com content 32 3 331 abstract The Award was founded for JPER by the co editors Lew Hopkins and Gill Chin Lim in honor of Professor Rapkin at his retirement It carries a cash grant supported by an endowment at the University of Illinois Foundation in Urbana The Chester Rapkin Award Committee for Volume 32 included Ann Forsyth Chair Matti Siemiatycki and Dick Klosterman This committee provided the following assessment of the selected paper William Lester s Labor Standards and Local Economic Development Do Living Wage Provisions Harm Economic Growth examines a topic of national interest for planning scholarship and practice The paper uses a rigorous thoroughly documented research design to consider the effect that including living wage standards in economic development policies have on employment levels and redevelopment activities The study uses an establishment level time series database and a sophisticated case selection approach to examine 31 jurisdictions that have and have not implemented these ordinances The paper concludes that

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/lester-jper-rapkin (2015-06-03)
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  • Economic Development Alumni Panel — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    in current section Text Increase font size Decrease font size Info Economic Development Alumni Panel Thank you to alums that sat on the Economic Development Panel Though you have only recently graduated your accomplishments are already quite impressive and highly inspirational to our current students Thanks again it was great having you back in New East Document Actions Send this Print this The Department of City and Regional Planning New

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/ed-alumni-panel (2015-06-03)
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