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  • Viewpoint: FHA and enduring the housing crisis — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    them to resume making home loans during a time of great financial uncertainty FHA popularized the 30 year fixed rate mortgage A fixture of U S home lending for decades it allowed more Americans than ever before to own their own home As a result homeownership climbed 18 percentage points between 1940 and 1960 As memory of the Great Depression receded and private institutions developed the market became less dependent on FHA In the lull between storms recognition of its value declined Then a new crisis hit When the housing market collapsed in the mid 2000s and private lenders fled FHA once again stepped in The agency s share of the home purchase mortgage market soared from under 5 percent in 2006 to nearly 38 percent in 2009 three years later Since 2008 FHA has helped nearly 4 2 million households buy a home and an additional 2 6 million homeowners including many that are underwater refinance to today s lower rates In North Carolina FHA guaranteed the credit risk of more than 190 000 borrowers in the last five years As it did during the 1930s FHA provided the stability needed for the market to begin regaining its footing It is important to note that in the run up to the crisis FHA continued providing traditional mortgage products such as the 30 year fixed while many private lenders opted for wildly profitable but exotic and untested loans that ultimately caused the crisis As a result FHA s business has performed significantly better Research from the UNC Center for Community Capital finds that only 14 percent of FHA insured loans made between 2000 and 2008 were seriously delinquent or foreclosed upon compared with 32 percent of subprime mortgages even though both served similar borrowers generally considered less creditworthy Friday s

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/quercia-viewpoint (2015-06-03)
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  • News — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Library Drive Chapel Hill residents will get a much larger new library with expanded community spaces But by moving the library away from businesses and restaurants we will lose several close and casual connections that are key to a thriving and walkable urban community Owners of energy efficient homes less likely to default on loans If you buy or own an energy efficient house does this make you less likely to default on your mortgage Is there a connection between the monthly savings on utility costs and the probability that you ll pay your loan on time A new study by the University of North Carolina suggests that the answer to both questions is a resounding yes Vishaan Chakrabarti 2013 Robert and Helen Siler Lecturer In this year s Robert and Helen Siler Lecture Chakrabarti will speak on the subject of his forthcoming book A Country of Cities Metropolis Books May 2013 in which he argues that dense well designed cities are the key to solving America s great national challenges environmental degradation unsustainable consumption economic stagnation rising public health costs and decreasing social mobility Planning For Affordable Housing Near Durham Orange Rail Line One consistent lesson that s been

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/news/news-home/atct_topic_view?b_start:int=95&-C= (2015-06-03)
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  • News — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research A Form Based Code Success Story Malta NY DCRP welcomed back 86 alumnus Lee Einsweiler from Code Studio Lee has been involved in planning zoning and plan implementation in a variety of settings over the past 25 years His main emphasis has been on redevelopment activity in urban areas Obama cites DCRP s minimum wage research in State of the Union address The President called

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/news/news-home/atct_topic_view?b_start:int=100&-C= (2015-06-03)
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  • Book Event: A Master Plan to Create a Sustainable Campus at UNC — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Dynamic Decade Creating the Sustainable Campus for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 2001 2011 The Dynamic Decade tells the story of the sweeping makeover of the 200 year old campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Six million square feet of buildings were constructed and a million square feet of historic buildings were renovated during one vibrant ten year period This massive growth required bold thinking and a vision for combining historic preservation green building and long range development A statewide bond issue award winning designs and unprecedented coordination between town and university made the vision a reality Written by authors who held major planning roles supplemented by interviews of key players and lavishly illustrated with color photographs and maps this comprehensive account offers valuable lessons to all concerned with sustainable university growth I am extremely grateful for all that was accomplished in what the authors of this book have described as the Dynamic Decade The transformation of the UNC campus made possible by a carefully designed master plan a strategically achieved development plan a politically charged bond referendum and an ambitiously imagined fundraising initiative was at its height when I moved into the Chancellor s office Holden Thorp Chancellor University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from the Afterword University of North Carolina Press 30 00 paperback David R Godschalk is Stephen Baxter Professor Emeritus in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill He chaired the Chancellor s Buildings and Grounds Committee and the Design and Operations Team for the 2001 Campus Master Plan Jonathan B Howes chaired the Executive Steering Team of the 2001 Campus Master Plan and was co convener of the first steering committee for the Horace Williams tract He has

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/dynamic-signing (2015-06-03)
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  • Invitation to the Weiss Program's 20th Anniversary and Book Signing — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    education research and outreach focused on improving life within urban communities In honor of the Weiss ULP s 20th anniversary The Graduate School commissioned a biography of Charles and Shirley Weiss This book titled Giving Is Good for the Soul The Life and Legacy of Charles and Shirley Weiss chronicles their lives together their formative intellectual interests their desire to advance research with true impact in our world their commitment to education and mentoring of graduate students and the value they placed on giving back Their generosity extended throughout UNC Chapel Hill and far beyond the University s borders Their lives have created a powerful message about the ways in which we can make the most of our days so others can make the most of their days We are truly privileged that Charles and Shirley shared their stories and lives with us We invite you to join us for a reception in honor of the Weiss Program s 20th anniversary on Sunday November 11 2012 from 2 p m to 4 p m at Carol Woods Retirement Community Our program will feature reflections from Charles among others and will be a memorable day for all of us We will

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/weiss-book (2015-06-03)
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  • What is a planning class at DCRP like? — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    you a feeling for what a classroom session at DCRP is like In this case we visited Assistant Professor Todd Bendor s PLAN 641 Ecology and Land Use Planning Course description PLAN 641 Ecology and Land Use Planning This course focuses on understanding the functions of ecosystems how land development activities impact such functions and how land use management tools can be used to create impact mitigation and restoration strategies The functions threats and protection strategies of watersheds and wetlands will be examined A key theme throughout the course will be to explore how the scientific knowledge of ecological relationships can be integrated into a land use planning framework The fundamental goal is to assure natural ecosystem integrity is sustained over the long term while accommodating human use and occupancy within natural ecological limits More information Todd BenDor Assistant Professor My research uses computer modeling and spatial analysis to better understand the impacts that human activities and development can have on sensitive ecological and environmental systems Teaching at DCRP has given me a unique opportunity to teach an array of courses at a variety of levels from college freshmen to Ph D students I also get the opportunity to advise

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/classroom-bendor (2015-06-03)
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  • Faculty Opinion: Vote yes on transit and get Orange County back on track — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    50 years Why America fell in love with Henry Ford We hit the road and got off track literally The nation s rail infrastructure once the envy of the world fell into decline Train stations were shuttered and razed from New York s mighty Pennsylvania Station to the little Southern Railway depot on Nash Street The last train pulled out of West Hillsborough in March 1964 the depot was pulled down a decade later rumor has it the salvaged floorboards are still sitting in a local barn This November we have an opportunity to build a new train station and get Orange County back on track The half cent sales tax public transit referendum if passed would provide funds to develop a new Amtrak depot in Hillsborough a facility that would benefit all Orange residents especially those in the northern part of the county The new depot located just off Churton Street a stone s throw from downtown would be a regional transit hub served by the 420 bus from Chapel Hill Overshadowed by the equally commendable Durham Orange light rail project the Amtrak station is the ripest of low hanging transit fruit in the Triangle It s been sanctioned by the Orange County Board of Commissioners endorsed by the University of North Carolina and supported by resolutions from all three local governments There s no need to purchase right of way or lay track the Town of Hillsborough already owns the land designated for the station Amtrak determined that adding a Hillsborough stop to the Carolinian and Piedmont routes would be profitable The station would be a boon for local tourism Students could use it to get home for the holidays a point the Daily Tar Heel made in an editorial On game days buses could run visitors from

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/opinion-transit (2015-06-03)
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  • Robert Moses, Pedal Pusher? (Opinion - Thomas J. Campanella) — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    more urban parks than anyone in U S history This green Moses a man we might almost imagine meeting for a cappuccino with Ms Sadik Khan ended lunatic plans for a highway through Prospect Park one of the world s craziest ideas blocked a scheme to fill Gerritsen Creek in Brooklyn one the city s last salt marshes halted the dumping of refuse in Jamaica Bay and canceled plans to transform its waters among the richest marine estuaries on the Atlantic coast into the world s largest industrial port And long before Mayor Michael Bloomberg s war against Slurpees Moses banned candy ice cream and soda from his city playgrounds He made the children drink fresh milk instead This other Robert Moses was also long opposed to a national system of superhighways something he is now routinely and incorrectly credited with inventing As Moses saw it interstate highways would be incredibly wasteful for they would be forced to run through many thinly populated sections of the country where no such super highways are needed Have to travel cross country Take the train To Moses the highway was an urban appliance only T he only justification for superhighways and parkways he explained in a 1940 letter to Thomas H MacDonald commissioner of public roads lies in their close relationship to metropolitan centers and substantial cities The whole point of such infrastructure he argued was to ease congestion a function of urban density what he failed to understand was that new highways often encourage more people to drive thus hardly alleviating congestion Moses early roads were themselves urbane meant to serve pedestrians as well as motorists The Brooklyn Heights Promenade one of the city s most sublime open spaces is literally a piece of highway infrastructure the Brooklyn Queens Expressway runs along cantilevered decks just below The outer borough parkways were especially well endowed with amenities for the nonmotoring public Please keep in mind Moses instructed landscape architect Allyn R Jennings that the incidental recreation features are just as important as the parkway itself especially for people in the neighborhoods along the route present and future who do not have automobiles To Moses the parkway was literally a park way not just an automobile roadway he explained to journalist Reagan McCrary but a narrow shoestring park including all sorts of recreation facilities Such as bike paths Few people think of Moses as a cycling advocate what with his infamous and unpardonable refusal to include bike lanes on the Verrazano Narrows Bridge ostensibly for fear of suicides But earlier in his career Moses was a keen advocate of bicycling and built New York City s first true bicycle infrastructure The Depression had set off a bicycle sales boom in the city as people could no longer afford cars In 1938 to accommodate all the new bicyclists Moses announced a vast system of bike paths fifty miles of paved parkland roads exclusively for bicycle riders gushed the New York Times that would enable bike

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/robertmoses (2015-06-03)
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