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  • New Publication: Adapting to Climate Change — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    This book identifies lessons learned from natural hazard experiences to help communities plan for and adapt to climate change Written by leading experts the case studies examine diverse experiences from severe storms to sea level related hazards droughts heat waves wildfires floods earthquakes and tsunami in North America Europe Australasia Asia Africa and Small Island Developing States The lessons are grouped according to four imperatives i Develop collaborative governance networks ii build adaptive capabilities iii invest in pre event planning and iv the moral imperative to undertake adaptive actions that advance resilience and sustainability This book is distinctive in providing climate change policy makers scholars students and practitioners with a rigorous understanding of lessons learned from natural hazards planning scholarship and experience that can help to overcome barriers and unlock opportunities for building communities that are sustainable and resilient to climate change Among other things this book will provide readers with insights into 1 Lessons learned from natural hazards planning scholarship and experience applied to integrating natural hazards risk management and climate change adaptation 2 Lessons learned from real world natural hazard and disaster experiences around the world with a focus on insights from disaster risk reduction hazard mitigation and

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/adapting-climate-change (2015-06-03)
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  • Grow your own way — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    of business was to outline the county s priorities with Gabe Cumming at the time director of the Warren County Economic Development Commission There s this economic development adage that says Shoot anything that flies Claim anything that falls Hunt says The mindset is we ll take whatever growth we can get We don t care Our approach in Warren County was very different from that You want to support the businesses that are already there that might expand Hunt explains Those businesses are committed to the place They re loyal The idea is that you re trying to find businesses that synchronize with everything else Some of the industries in Warren County include forest products agriculture and renewable energy so the economic development commission hoped to create incentives for industries that would complement those One of Warren County s biggest priorities was respecting the land First and foremost we have 270 000 acres of forests farmland and water bodies Cumming says Those are great assets and we wanted to develop an economic strategy that would capitalize on those instead of detracting from them Take lumber for example Warren County is home to three hardwood saw mills that produce a large quantity of raw lumber But very little of that lumber is further processed in Warren County When it leaves the sawmill it leaves the county to be used in plants across North Carolina Virginia and beyond A more efficient and more economically beneficial approach would be to have those lumber processors located in the county We re trying to develop whole sectors not just isolated firms that have no compelling reason to be here Cumming says According to Hunt county officials sometimes keep their economic development strategies confidential they see other counties as competition and they don t want their ideas stolen But when Hunt reached out to Dianne Reid an economic developer from Chatham County Reid was more than happy to help Chatham County s population is larger and has more resources at its disposal but its comprehensive approach to economic development was something that Warren County wanted to replicate Chatham created a points based system that provided a template for us Cumming says And they awarded incentive points for nontraditional criteria Instead of just looking at traditional measures like number of jobs and number of dollars the officials in Chatham also took things like environmental impact and location into account The points based system works like this a firm considering location in the county can receive a certain number of points depending on factors like the number of local people they plan to hire or their environmental stewardship The more points you get the more grant money you re given Hunt says It rewards good behavior Her expertise was crucial for working out the details of each potential incentive How do you prove that you ve met certain environmental criteria Which of those standards do you apply What do other places do This attention to detail will

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/growyourownway (2015-06-03)
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  • Program on Chinese Cities — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    daunting in scale and complexity without exaggeration the lives of millions will depend on how well China manages the continued growth of its cities in coming years says Dr Yan Song It is exciting that this group of researchers at DCRP are developing whole new areas of research expertise Their work focuses on a variety of areas including sustainable environment and energy land use and transportation planning urban redevelopment and its social equity implications economic development policy property rights infrastructure planning and government finance Since its creation PCC has hosted more than two dozen visiting scholars from China The Program on Chinese Cities PCC a new initiative within the Center for Urban Regional Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducts research and training aimed at better understanding the impacts of rapid urban growth on China s built and natural environments The Program explores ways to make China s urbanization process more equitable transparent and socially and ecologically sustainable PCC was recently awarded a UNC China Technology Learning Grant which will enable students in the Department of City and Regional Planning to take a course on urban and environment management issues with students from Peking University Learn more about the Program on Chinese Cities Yan Song Ph D Director Yan Song is Associate Professor of city and regional planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Professor in Peking University a fellow of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy a fellow of the National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland an affiliate professor at Peking University and a visiting director for the city planning program at Shenzhen University in China She holds a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Song s research interests include the following areas comparative evaluations

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/news/pcc (2015-06-03)
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  • Community Engagement — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    the region says Nguyen The biggest challenge facing the workshop team was writing a plan that is respectful of Quy Nhon s community development ideals which are based in a political environment radically different from our own The trip was invaluable in providing context to help students address this issue Checking up on Reality Check Land Use Environmental Planning Workshop In 2009 Triangle Tomorrow in cooperation with ULI the Urban Land Institute conducted a Reality Check workshop in Raleigh with 300 interested citizens professionals municipal officials and others from the 15 counties centered on the Triangle area Working at 30 tables the groups envisioned the location of growth in the region over the next 20 years Each group assigned new population and employment as well as transportation linkages and open space to a grid of one mile square units Generally the groups located population and employment at significantly higher densities and more compactly than the existing development pattern Although the groups had generated numerous Reality Check 2030 scenarios no baseline scenario existed to provide a benchmark for comparison DCRP students in the Land Use Environmental Planning Workshop generated both a Baseline and Reality Check 2030 scenario and then conducted a comparative analysis of the costs and benefits associated with each Each student was assigned a county met with area planning authorities and analyzed ArcGIS data to explore what growth might look like over the next 20 years After reviewing the two growth scenarios and examining the implications of each the workshop students recommended that the 15 county region adopt principles encouraging vibrant city centers monitoring area wide transit and protecting undeveloped open space to guide decisions about future growth management infrastructure development and public service allocation Failure to do so would have far reaching implications for the quality of life in the whole Triangle region Carolina Economic Revitalization Corps program evolves in second year The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development and School of Government are proud to announce the continuation of the Carolina Economic Revitalization Corps CERC The program selects five returning graduate students from Carolina in any program or discipline administered by the Graduate School to carry out economic revitalization work in low capacity and economically distressed communities across the state of North Carolina for a one year period The Carolina Economic Revitalization Corps CERC formerly the Carolina Economic Recovery Corps addresses an urgent need in North Carolina how do economically distressed communities with little or no professional staff do the planning and make the investments necessary for economic and community development CERC attempts to address this challenge through the placement of graduate students from UNC Chapel Hill in regional organizations serving low capacity municipalities across the state This initiative seeks to leverage the assets of the University by putting boots on the ground to help small towns plan for and gain access to critical federal and state funding and to undertake the compliance and reporting associated with those grants The next group of CERC members will be selected and trained during the 2011 spring semester and placed at a regional organization for a paid 10 week summer internship where they will assist low capacity towns and counties with community and economic development planning grant research and writing and project implementation Following this 10 week internship Corps members will return to Carolina and continue to work remotely with their host organization for 12 to 15 hours per week over the course of two semesters In addition Corps members are required to write and submit periodic articles for the School of Government s community and economic development blog see link below A paid stipend tuition support and graduate student health insurance will be provided to Corps Members The Carolina Economic Revitalization Corps grew out of a project during the summer of 2009 which placed nine graduate students from City and Regional Planning Social Work and Law at local Councils of Governments COGs and the NC League of Municipalities Since 2009 Corps members have worked with thirteen different regional organizations providing much needed technical assistance to over 90 localities however it is only the beginning of what needs to be done Communities must look beyond temporary stimulus funding opportunities to truly revitalize their economies It is in this effort that CERC is contributing to a more enduring recovery and revitalization of North Carolina s most distressed areas The main difference between the first and current round of CERC is that the program has expanded from a 10 week summer experience to include remote part time assistance during the following two semesters This was developed in response to feedback from the first summer s corps members who felt that 10 weeks was not enough time to meaningfully contribute to their host regions The expanded program means that each corps member spends a full year on the project enabling more meaningful connections and more long term accomplishments Stay current with CERC s efforts by visiting their blog at sogweb sog unc edu blogs ced UNC N C State students win national urban design contest A team of NC State University and UNC Chapel Hill students won a national urban design competition with their redevelopment plan for a San Diego neighborhood The team won the 50 000 top prize in the 2010 Urban Land Institute Hines Design Competition The team s plan for an area within the East Village neighborhood now a mishmash of new housing old warehouses and parking lots is called Family Oriented Development The design emphasizes neighborhood diversity affordability and walkability and accommodates the diverse needs of families of different sizes ages and economic levels The NCSU UNC team bested the other finalists from Harvard University the University of Maryland and the University of Pennsylvania in San Diego on April 8 2010 The NCSU UNC team members were Maria Papiez leader Rebecca Myers Jeff Pleshek and Matt Tomasulo from NCSU and Daria Khramtsova from UNC Professor Robin Fran Abrams director of the School of Architecture at NCSU was the lead teaching advisor for the team during the competition DCRP Professor and Chair Emil Malizia also advised the team For the first time Professors Abrams and Malizia combined their courses an urban design studio at NCSU and a real estate development workshop at UNC Chapel Hill There were 20 graduate architecture or landscape architecture students in the studio course and 10 graduate city and regional planning students in the workshop The first phase of the competition began in January 2010 and lasted two weeks A total of 132 teams from 48 universities in the U S and Canada submitted proposals including the 6 teams from the combined NCSU UNC course Professors Abrams and Malizia have agreed to combine their courses again in spring 2011 to participate in the next Hines competition View the team s design proposal Examining the Changing Commute to UNC Transportation Planning Workshop In 1997 the University commissioned its first study of campus commuting patterns The purpose of the study was to survey both students and employees about the various travel modes they use to commute to campus as well as their origins and destinations The data gathered was used to help UNC Department of Transportation and Parking and the Town of Chapel Hill plan for University and Town transportation needs This study was repeated in 2001 2004 and 2007 In 2009 the University again surveyed the campus community to determine how campus commuting patterns have changed in the last two years This latest study provides comprehensive information about the current state of campus commuter behavior and characteristics makes comparisons to the 1997 2001 2004 and 2007 studies where they are possible and relevant and offers analysis of trends in the data and the implications of these trends for on campus and off campus decision makers The report is divided into several sections a brief explanation of the study s methodology a chapter detailing employee commuting patterns a chapter detailing student commuting patterns and finally a discussion of major findings Checking up on Reality Check Land Use Planning Workshop In February 2009 Triangle Tomorrow in cooperation with ULI the Urban Land Institute conducted a Reality Check workshop in Raleigh with 300 interested citizens professionals municipal officials and others from the 15 counties centered on the Triangle area Working at 30 tables the groups envisioned the location of growth in the region over the next 20 years Each group assigned new population and employment as well as transportation linkages and open space to a grid of one mile square units Generally the groups located population and employment at significantly higher densities and more compactly than the existing development pattern The Workshop Supervisor assisted by a Master s student from the Department of City and Regional Planning compiled background information on Reality Check in April May 2009 The idea of this workshop developed from an important omission from the original exercise Although the groups had generated numerous Reality Check scenarios no baseline scenario existed for 2030 to provide a basis for comparison The land use workshop was planned in the summer of 2009 and began in the fall semester This report was completed in May 2010 The students first developed Baseline and Reality Check scenarios and then conducted a comparative analysis of the costs and benefits associated with the two scenarios In essence they compared more compact transit oriented development to lower density dispersed development patterns that mirrored past development Planning Students Help Communities Across North Carolina Secure Funding For many recent graduates the question What did you do last summer provokes an uneasy feeling With a tough economic climate facing graduating students and even greater budgetary shortfalls faced by many local governments jobs were scarce As North Carolina battled budget shortfalls in the face of a lagging economy the UNC system used one of its greatest resources its students expertise to help small businesses and local governments throughout the state weather the economic crisis To meet the state s needs UNC Chapel Hill launched a new internship program in the summer of 2009 called the Carolina Economic Recovery Corps CERC Carolina graduate students spent ten weeks working full time with Councils of Government COGS across the state The main thrust of their work was to identify economic recovery needs and to secure federal funding from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ARRA The principal partners who put together this program were Jesse White Director of UNC Office of Economic and Business Development OEBD and his steering committee with support and funding from Tony Waldrop Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development White says that each intern position was designed to help its assigned region come up with grant proposals for specific communities Although the money that funded the program came from UNC the grants that the interns helped secure for communities will come from the ARRA The intern positions played a vital role in connecting and managing the relationships between the COGs and their local governments Of the nine interns selected competitively for the program five were from the Department of City and Regional Planning They were placed in various Councils of Governments COGs across the state including RTP Rutherfordton Greensboro Asheville Wilmington Washington Charlotte and Wilson During the program students lived in the communities and heard first hand what the needs were doing their best to match those needs with available funding Acting as liaisons between the council and smaller local governments the interns traveled to meet with various city officials about economic recovery funding and stimulus package grants They ensured that local administrators had the correct information to apply for the targeted grants and they walked many of them through the application process For larger local governments ARRA funding was seem as an opportunity to seek new development ventures and to fund long awaited projects For smaller local governments the new funding opportunities presented by the Recovery Act were often met with resistance because of the time and resources that would be required to apply for and administer these grants Joshua Levy OEBD Assistant Director believes that continuing economic recovery efforts are important Many small towns don t have the capacity to apply for funding so CERC is way to connect them to resources Ten weeks is a short timeframe but the goal is for CERC to impact long term economic recovery by investing in the future The CERC intern program is a successful example of how universities can partner to help local organizations and give students and faculty internship and research opportunities The interns accomplishments did not go unnoticed by UNC s administration either Chancellor Holden Thorp chose the CERC program as the subject of a recent blog post in this economy I got a job helping others who don t have jobs get back into the work force seems like a pretty good answer to the question What do you do this summer Students Create Town Impemention Plan In late 2008 public and private leaders from the eastern North Carolina city of Kinston submitted a proposal to UNC s Community Campus Partnership for Tomorrow and the Golden Leaf Foundation for assistance in planning and implementing a comprehensive redevelopment plan for the greater Kinston area As a part of the initiative a targeted proposal was sent to UNC s Kenan Institute The Kenan Institute agreed to address the particularly depressed conditions along the Highway 11 Corridor on the east side of Kinston also known as the Martin Luther King MLK Corridor During the Spring 2009 semester the Kenan Institute set out to provide an actionable redevelopment plan utilizing the Student Teams Achieving Results STAR program at the Kenan Flagler Business School After developing the scope of the work in the summer building on the work of the STAR team the department of City and Regional Planning DCRP conducted a graduate workshop tasked with developing a report that emphasized implementation for the city of Kinston The resulting implementation plan covers five primary areas of work in the MLK Corridor residential development and affordable housing zoning and physical improvements transportation emphasizing economic development goals identification of funding sources and community outreach The workshop led by Dr Robin Howarth was conducted with a comprehensive approach that divided the students into five teams that corresponded to the five primary areas of work Each team worked independently to address its specific tasks while also meeting regularly with other teams to exchange information and find connections Early in the process students identified a critical need for garnering the support and contributions of residents in the MLK neighborhood if sustainable outcomes were to be achieved The Community Team organized a neighborhood meeting in October 2009 to solicit input that would be useful to each of the other teams and to identify potential leadership for providing ongoing community involvement in the redevelopment of the MLK Corridor Other connections were established between groups through the Zoning and Physical Improvements Team s development of a series of six case studies highlighting recent successful revitalization strategies in similar North Carolina towns Findings from the case studies were incorporated in the work of those students addressing housing funding transportation and community outreach strategies in an effort to assure that their output was both timely and practical All five teams identified and worked toward common broad outcomes for the workshop First and foremost the teams focused on developing recommendations for the City that would be feasible and actionable within three years in order to meet the implementation criterion Secondly the teams prioritized needs and identified likely resources to meet these needs with an eye towards preserving the city s current resources A third priority was to nest the desired outcomes with existing plans in order to recognize and incorporate prior efforts The fourth priority was to ensure the validity of the work by being sensitive to and addressing the issues identified by the MLK Corridor residents Finally the teams recommendations were to be sustainable based on realistic assessments of existing conditions and potential capacity at the city and community levels DCRP Workshop Results in Durham Reforming Local Incentive Use In these difficult economic times good jobs related news is often hard to come by Durham North Carolina received some recently when an electronics manufacturer from the United Kingdom ACW Technology announced it had picked the city as a site to build a large scale manufacturing facility In exchange for selecting Durham city officials granted a modest 70 000 in location incentives But this was no ordinary incentive offer This one came with important and unique conditions that ensure that local residents will be at the head of the line when it comes to being considered for these new jobs Under the terms of the incentives agreement ACW has committed to giving Durham s JobLink Career Center a city managed federally funded employment agency priority in recruiting and referring applicants for its 155 job openings While those referred by JobLink are not guaranteed jobs it does provide Durham residents with a leg up in the hiring process Additionally this agreement enables JobLink to prioritize job placement for unemployed and underemployed Durham residents With this groundbreaking agreement Durham begins a positive chapter in its efforts to reform how local officials grant incentives when trying to lure new companies to their area Of course it took years of careful planning and advocacy to get to this point Back in 2006 a local organization called Durham C A N Congregations Associations and Networks contacted DCRP Durham C A N is a social justice coalition made up of community and faith based organizations and is affiliated with Saul Alinsky s Industrial Areas Foundation In response to C A N s request for assistance DCRP Assistant Professor Nichola Lowe designed an economic development workshop course in spring 2007 that enabled students to investigate Durham County and City s incentive granting process and make recommendations for improvements based on a nationwide review of best practices C A N used the results

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/research-engagement/engagement/engagement (2015-06-03)
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  • UNC, Peking University establish urban planning consortium — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    also bring together researchers who will examine the unprecedented migration of hundreds of millions of Chinese from rural to urban areas in the coming decades They will also examine the environmental social and ecological impacts of that migration The Center for Urban and Regional Studies and the Department of City and Regional Planning in UNC s College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Urban and Environmental Sciences and the School of Urban Planning and Design at Peking University are the key members of this consortium The rate of urban growth in China is extraordinary says William Rohe DCRP Professor and director of the UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies In a decade or two small Chinese towns are literally developing into metropolises Rohe and Ron Strauss executive associate provost and chief international officer for the University of North Carolina were in Beijing China in late May to sign the consortium agreement and participate in a joint symposium of UNC and Peking University scholars DCRP faculty members Phil Berke Roberto Quercia and Yan Song along with Jack Kasarda of the Kenan Institute and Brian Morton of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies also travelled to Beijing to

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/news/consortium (2015-06-03)
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  • Urban Land Use Planning — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    goals deftly balancing the definitive discussion of current practices with a vision of what land use planning should become Divided into three sections the book explores the societal context of land use planning and proposes a model for understanding and reconciling the divergent priorities among competing stakeholders it explains how to build planning support systems to assess future conditions evaluate policy choices create visions and compare scenarios and it sets forth a methodology for creating plans that will influence future land use change Discussions new to the fifth edition include how to incorporate the three Es of sustainable development economy environment and equity into sustainable communities methods for including livability objectives and techniques the integration of transportation and land use the use of digital media in planning support systems and collective urban design based on analysis and public participation First published in the 1950s by Stuart Chapin one of DCRP s founders Urban Land Use Planning was designed for use by students and professors in graduate and undergraduate courses and as a reference book for practicing planners The 5th Edition continues and updates the long tradition of ULUP in DCRP with the new plan making practices that utilize sustainable development

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/research-engagement/ulup1 (2015-06-03)
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  • Carolina Planning Journal — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of City and Regional Planning We are the oldest student run planning publication in the country celebrating our 40th year in 2014 This year s theme is Collaborations in Planning with articles covering a wide variety of topics including DC s Capital Bikeshare an introduction to the emerging trend of using multistate megaregions for large scale planning lessons from the local and regional community and economic development work of GroWNC in Western NC and the Clinch River Valley Initiative in VA and research from MIT on how planners can collaborate to tackle climate change issues We re also featuring success stories from around the state of North Carolina The issue is being printed now and will ship in early June Subscribe today and support CPJ s work in bringing engaging and relevant writing to planners nationwide https squareup com market carolina planning journal Carolina Planning the oldest student run planning publication in the country is produced once a year in UNC s Department of City and Regional Planning Articles selected for the journal are written by academics and practitioners covering a wide range of topics relevant to today s planning challenges Carolina Planning

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/research-engagement/carplan (2015-06-03)
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  • Engagement — UNC Department of City & Regional Planning
    Admissions 2015 Open House Process FAQ Financial Assistance Program Performance Academics Doctoral Ph D Guidelines PDF Masters Planning Specializations Planning Tracks Dual Degrees Other Programs Undergraduate Minor FAQ Course Listing Fall 2015 Courses PDF Spring 2015 Courses PDF GIS Library Resources Engagement Engagement Research Centers Urban Land Use Planning GIS Library Resources Carolina Planning Journal People Faculty Emeriti Faculty Students Planners Forum Class of 2015 Class of 2016 Doctoral Students

    Original URL path: http://planning.unc.edu/research-engagement/sitemap (2015-06-03)
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