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  • Smart metros: Charlotte and North Carolina | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    levels correspond closely with the highest education areas incomes above the state median are not quiet as concentrated as the college educated population Higher incomes are spread more widely around Charlotte in a suburban ring that surrounds the region fairly evenly This income pattern corresponds with a zone of low poverty that wraps around Charlotte and contrasts with areas of higher poverty that occur both in rural areas on the fringe of the metro and in an arc across the northern central parts of Charlotte poverty map for the state is below The rise in rural poverty during the recession has been widely covered as a national phenomenon Along with this rising rural poverty a new pattern in North Carolina since 2010 has been declining populations in many rural areas most of which saw at least moderate increases through the 2000s The statewide map of income below shows the effect of the metro regions Large areas in and around Charlotte and Raleigh are above the median while the areas farthest from any of the larger metro areas typically showing the lowest income The map showing poverty by block group below shows a nearly mirrored pattern to income as expected but the zones of higher poverty areas are clearer within urban centers Keep in mind that these smaller but denser patterns of block groups represent larger populations than the larger block group zones in the rural areas view PDFs to see the pattern more clearly These maps highlight two public policy concerns Rural areas outside of the metropolitan zones of population growth and economic activity face lower levels of education and income and higher levels of poverty This is not unlike other rural areas nationally but North Carolina is late coming into this transition and many rural areas of the state are beginning to see declining population since 2010 for more information click here Urban cores areas across the state contain significant populations of lower income and education Read recent report that found a majority of the people living in distressed areas in the state were in metropolitan regions As global trends continue to reinforce clustering of educated populations and economic activity in metropolitan areas challenges will persist in dealing with the effects on both rural and urban areas Population densities access to resources demographics and culture all call for different strategies when addressing urban and rural areas Urban cores may have some advantage by being in the center of economic activity and growth in the state but the number of persons affected by these issues in urban areas is larger and more concentrated Rural areas do not typically suffer from the added issues associated with concentrations of poverty but isolation and declining populations in these areas are major concerns The geography of educational attainment offers a better understanding of the issues of income and poverty These maps make it clear that clustering among educated populations has already resulted in stark contrasts within and between cities and regions of the state

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/education-poverty-income-charlotte-nc-census-2012 (2016-02-18)
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  • Recession in Charlotte, Sun Belt: more people, more poverty | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    of the jobs associated with population growth are in lower wage sectors New employment numbers released Oct 2 in North Carolina show that low wage sectors are now producing 40 percent of jobs in Charlotte and half of new jobs in some metros in the state In the period since 2010 another pattern in population change has emerged A large number of rural counties are losing population in the areas surrounding growing metros like Charlotte and Raleigh This suggests that residents in struggling rural economies that have lost manufacturing jobs may be attracted to the lower wage service sector jobs being created in urban areas Increasing poverty rates reflect the economic stress on these southeastern metros with the onset of the recession graph below The recession caused poverty to spike in many areas of the country but in these metros the increase in poverty rates accompanied continued increases in population sometimes very strong increases as was the case in Raleigh and Charlotte for full report on metro poverty Source Brookings ACS Census data Richard Florida is one researcher who has looked at the question of population growth s relationship to economic growth for metros around the nation Florida asserts that while many people use population as a way to gauge regional growth or decline it actually tells us little about economic growth Florida s analysis of U S metros shows a clear pattern of strong population growth through the 2000s in the Southeastern U S But these same high population growth metro regions fall to the bottom of the pack in his measure of economic strength Only energy rich metros in Texas and Louisiana bucked the trend and showed strength in his measure of productivity growth economic output per capita The same pattern of high population growth without strong economic growth is evident in a large area of the Southwest including metros like Las Vegas see maps and read more here Will this trend continue If rural economic growth does not improve that may continue to add to population growth in metro areas in the Southeast Strengthening economies in metro areas will also fuel continuing population growth The graph above shows that some Southeastern metro areas saw a slight decline in poverty rates from 2011 to 2012 a hopeful sign However the just released employment report does not look as hopeful for the creation of higher wage jobs in these metro areas As rural areas continue to struggle economically pressure to move to where jobs are being created even low wage jobs could prolong this pattern of urban population growth without commensurate income growth Harvard economist Edward Glaeser noted in his book Triumph of the City that poorer people come to cities because cities offer advantages they couldn t find in their previous homes Glaeser p 70 As economic activity and people continue to gravitate to metro areas especially in Southern states the economic strength of the urban regions will likely be even more important to the states overall economic

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/charlotte-population-growth-poverty (2016-02-18)
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  • Commuting in Charlotte region: Where do people work? | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    counties look unfamiliar Click here to read about the recent changes to MSAs and the effect on the Charlotte region Like other counties in the region workers who live in Mecklenburg County do not always work in the same county where they live More than 40 000 Mecklenburg residents travel outside the county to work in surrounding counties including Cabarrus 9 678 York S C 9 197 Union 7 359 Iredell 5 361 Gaston 4 404 Rowan 1 561 Lincoln 1 272 and Lancaster S C 1 390 counties 2 Each county in the MSA has a unique commute pattern In Cabarrus the majority of residents also worked in Cabarrus Additional residents commuted to nearby Mecklenburg Rowan and Iredell counties Gaston County residents commuted to six different counties although a majority 58 6 percent worked in Gaston County An additional 29 3 percent of workers commuted to Mecklenburg County for work while the remainder went to Lincoln Rowan Union or York counties Iredell workers were most likely to work where they resided 69 1 percent were employed in Iredell The remaining workers mainly commuted to Cabarrus Mecklenburg and Rowan counties all adjacent to Iredell Unlike Iredell the majority 56 6 percent of workers living in Lincoln County commuted to nearby counties for employment Sixty five percent of Rowan County residents worked in Rowan The remainder commuted to nearby Cabarrus Davidson and Iredell counties Additional workers commuted farther south to Mecklenburg County accounting for 8 5 percent of workers in the period from 2006 to 2010 Union County has experienced drastic growth over the past 15 years Fifty percent of the workers who lived in Union also work there Other workers commuted to nearby Mecklenburg 42 4 percent as well as Cabarrus Gaston Iredell York and Lancaster counties Compared to other counties in the Charlotte MSA region workers in Union commuted to more counties with some traveling as far as Cleveland County west of Gaston County In South Carolina the majority of workers who resided in Lancaster and York counties also worked in these counties In Chester 48 8 percent of residents worked in the county while the remainder traveled to adjacent York Lancaster and Mecklenburg counties Over half 51 5 percent of Lancaster residents worked in the county while the remainder largely traveled to Mecklenburg Union Chester and York for employment York County experienced 62 4 percent of its residents working within the county The remainder traveled to adjacent Gaston Mecklenburg Chester and Lancaster counties With many workers in the region commuting across county lines to work the private vehicle is by far the most popular mode of transportation In 2011 the majority of workers in the Charlotte MSA drove alone 81 percent or carpooled 9 5 percent to work 3 While access to public transportation varies from county to county as does its efficiency the region experienced a slight increase in the use of public buses or rail as means to get to work in recent years Although only

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/commuting-charlotte-2013-counties-msa (2016-02-18)
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  • Elizabeth Workman | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    2010 Her research interests include local and state government urban and suburban issues and social demographics Education Expertise Articles Commuting in Charlotte region Where do people work Mar 28 2013 According to the U S Census Bureau 153 015 individuals who worked in Mecklenburg County commuted from another county in the Charlotte MSA among the highest number of county to county commuters in the U S Photo Nancy Pierce March is Women s History Month Mar 12 2013 March is Women s History Month Its origins date back more than 30 years when President Carter proclaimed the second week of March as National Women s History Week in 1980 Seven years later as the result of a persistent national lobbying effort Congress passed a public law designating the Voters economic outlook isn t pushing them to the polls Oct 30 2012 Are people who are unemployed or financially distressed more likely to vote than those who have jobs or are financially sound According to data going back to the 1992 general election they are not Time will tell whether the job losses and damaged personal finances of the Great Recession Empowering women transforms societies Women s Summit 2012 Apr 24

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/node/9695 (2016-02-18)
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  • Claire Apaliski | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    with multiple client based research initiatives and needs assessments for various organizations in the Charlotte community Her responsibilities include project design and management data collection and review report writing and review client relations and graduate student supervision Education Claire earned a bachelor s degree in geography with a concentration in environmental science from Villanova University Villanova Pa in 2008 and her master s degree in geography from UNC Charlotte in 2013 Expertise Demography mismatch of social well being resources and health related data Articles Teacher turnover rate for 2013 2014 Jun 19 2015 This week s EdMap illustrates the teacher turnover rate by district for the 2013 14 school year 2013 2014 Annual Measurable Objectives by school Jun 16 2015 This week s EdMap takes a closer look at the latest Annual Measurable Objectives AMOs at the school level Annual measurable targets by district 2013 2014 Jun 09 2015 This week s EdMap looks at the school districts that met annual measurable objectives AMOs across the state N C student proficiency by school 2013 14 Jun 02 2015 This week s EdMap takes a closer look at the newest proficiency data at the school level N C student grade level and subject proficiency by district 2013 14 May 28 2015 This week s EdMaps take a closer look at the newest proficiency data by school district Mapping N C student overall proficiency by district 2013 14 May 20 2015 This week s EdMap looks at the newest proficiency data for school districts for end of grade EOG and end of course EOC exams Per pupil expenditures by type 2010 2014 May 14 2015 This week s EdMap looks closer at how per pupil expenditures are spent at the district level Per pupil expenditures 2004 2014 May 06 2015 This week

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/node/9761 (2016-02-18)
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  • Economy | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    explore facts about the Economy in the Charlotte region See how the region s counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country EXPLORE DATA BY SELECTING FROM ONE OF ELEVEN TOPICS Select a topic Arts Recreation Culture Demographics Economy Education Environment Government Citizen Participation Health Housing Public Safety Social Well Being Transportation Browser not compatible Articles Gaston once a manufacturing sector powerhouse now lags Union John Chesser Feb 28 2013 Local perceptions may not have caught up with the new reality in the Charlotte region s manufacturing economy Even before the recession began in 2007 declines in the textile and furniture industries were changing the structure of local employment As the downturn continued counties that depended less on textile and furniture manufacturing lost fewer jobs The result Several counties traditionally considered centers of manufacturing employment such as Gaston now have a smaller percentage of jobs in manufacturing than fast growing Union Is the Charlotte region ready for another boom John Chesser Feb 14 2013 Times have been tough in the local economy but it looks as if we ve finally turned the corner If growth is starting to make a comeback exactly where will it be Is your county ready Photo U S Census Bureau Public Information Office Charlotte s economic recovery struggles to take hold Laura Simmons Oct 25 2012 Charlotte has lagged much of the country in this period of economic recovery but the region has finally begun to see a few small signs of better days on the horizon Over the past several months there has been gradual improvement in the unemployment rate and home price index in the region These bright spots are welcome news in a region that continues to suffer the effects of the Great Recession

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/data/topic/economy?page=1 (2016-02-18)
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  • As N.C. graduation rates rise, CMS and Wake are tied | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    the largest cluster of higher graduation rates Other mountain districts with high graduation rates are in the far western portion of the state Another data dashboard is available to see these geographic trends as they change over time from 2006 to 2013 This dashboard also offers the ability to visually filter the rates in any given year to display areas of higher or lower graduation rates Although the measurement cohort graduation rate is standard through the period there are some differences between districts to note In North Carolina districts have had the option to add their own additional requirements for graduation to the state s basic requirements During this period Charlotte Mecklenburg schools reduced some of their additional requirements but not until last year from 2012 to 2013 The state of North Carolina requires 22 credits for ninth graders entering in the 2012 2013 school year In Wake County traditional diplomas require 26 credits and CTE Career and Technical Education diplomas require 22 credits In CMS the number of credits required for graduation was 28 until 2012 In 2013 the number required for graduation was reduced to 24 To see if other school districts have requirements beyond the state minimum consult individual school district websites Another consideration when comparing rates over time are changes to state testing policy In 2009 the state began a new policy requiring students who fail end of year exams to re test That policy ended in spring of this year The overall N C rate moved up at a slightly faster pace in the years after this re testing policy was instituted see graph above Taking into account these differences in graduation requirements and changes to testing over time the state is still experiencing a positive trend in high school graduation rates As the graduation rates move up differences between districts are narrowing meaning the overall trend is toward more consistent graduation rates among districts The largest urban districts Wake County and Mecklenburg County are just below the state average but CMS rates have been tracking closely with the state s improving rate in recent years and the difference from the state average has narrowed Try the tools linked above to do your own analysis of graduation rates in recent years The tools allow for the comparison of any public school districts in the state The four year cohort graduation rate is the percent of students who entered ninth grade in a particular year who graduated four years later See further explanation of the way this is calculated below A cohort refers to a high school class using 2009 10 data as an example Students in a school district in the ninth grade in 2006 07 plus students who transferred into the district in the grade appropriate to the cohort minus students who transferred out of the district or are deceased Dropout students count as non graduates unless they later enroll in another school and graduate on time Students who receive a GED are not

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/hs-graduation-rate-north-carolina-trend-map (2016-02-18)
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  • Education | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    Find the story in the numbers See below to explore facts about Education in the Charlotte region See how the region s counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country EXPLORE DATA BY SELECTING FROM ONE OF ELEVEN TOPICS Select a topic Arts Recreation Culture Demographics Economy Education Environment Government Citizen Participation Health Housing Public Safety Social Well Being Transportation Browser not compatible Articles Explore CMS data at the school level John Chesser Apr 18 2013 The UNC Charlotte Urban Institute has partnered with MeckEd to provide a series of interactive maps that allow the public to do their own exploration of CMS schools Those maps have now been combined into a new interface that creates an integrated school data resource Graphic Zach Szczepaniak Is the Charlotte region ready for another boom John Chesser Feb 14 2013 Times have been tough in the local economy but it looks as if we ve finally turned the corner If growth is starting to make a comeback exactly where will it be Is your county ready Photo U S Census Bureau Public Information Office CMS proficiency Maps and trends John Chesser Jan 29 2013 Maps

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/data/topic/education?page=1 (2016-02-18)
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