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  • Charlotte economic outlook improves for first quarter | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    a negative outlook on the national economy with national expectations declining another 1 5 points from the fourth quarter 2012 to first quarter 2013 The survey recorded positive expectations for four of the six component questions that contribute to the overall index As the table shows all but two of the first quarter index values posted an increase The profits index recorded a value of 58 7 representing the largest increase among all index values increasing 4 6 points from the fourth quarter 2012 With an index value of 56 5 business leaders continue to be confident about the local economy more so than the national economy Business leaders have the highest expectations for sales with a sales index value of 59 8 Profits and hiring expectations both reported positive index values of 58 7 and 56 0 respectively With an index value of 47 8 capital expenditures recorded a negative index value for the second consecutive quarter Participation in the index is open to all businesses in Mecklenburg County who must first register to receive quarterly invitations to complete the survey For classification and verification purposes the registration asks for company information concerning business type revenue and employment size To see a copy of the full report from the first quarter click the link below For more information about the Charlotte Business Confidence Index its methodology and how business leaders can register to participate go to www ui uncc edu businessconfidence Related articles Turkeys Pecans Collards Mapping your Thanksgiving meal Nov 19 2015 Has Charlotte metro income really declined Sep 24 2014 The ailing and failing American middle class Sep 11 2014 Gaston agencies foundation work with institute to create new online resource May 15 2014 The ups and downs of Charlotte housing prices May 01 2014 Donate If

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/economic-outlook-first-quarter-2013-charlotte (2016-02-18)
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  • Veterans in Mecklenburg: An infographic | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    enlist in the armed services However only one third of the county s veterans have four year college degrees compared to more than 40 percent of non veterans The unemployment rate for veterans in Mecklenburg County is slightly lower than non veterans 9 4 percent vs 10 6 percent As a group veterans have higher incomes and lower poverty rates than non veterans in line with national trends The income figures used here might seem lower than expected that is because these figures represent personal income not household income which is more commonly reported Also important to note is that income includes not only wages but also Social Security retirement pensions Veterans Affairs payments other public assistance and many other forms of periodic income Interesting differences appear when dissecting income by gender The distance between men s and women s incomes is greater among veterans than non veterans The difference between veteran and non veteran incomes is larger for men than women Disabilities are more prevalent among veterans This is not surprising given that many have served in combat roles but also because veterans as a group are older than non veterans More than one third of veterans are over 65 Click here to scroll to data notes and source information for the infographic Data Notes Data Source U S Census Bureau 2011 American Community Survey 1 Year Estimates Table S2101 Unless otherwise noted all statistics presented are for the civilian population 18 years and over and do not include children or individuals who are currently serving on active duty Veterans are defined as individuals who are at least 18 years of age and served for any period of time but are not currently serving on active duty in the U S Armed Forces The race and ethnicity statistics presented are limited to individuals of a single race Hispanic or Latino is not considered a separate race but an ethnicity so individuals identifying as Hispanic or Latino can be of any race Educational attainment figures are for the civilian population 25 years and over High school graduate includes equivalency GED Employment statistics are for the civilian population 18 to 64 years old The labor force consists of people classified as employed or unemployed Median income numbers represent the personal income in the past 12 months Income includes wages Social Security retirement pensions Veterans Affairs payments other public assistance and other forms of income Figures reported reflect 2011 inflation adjusted dollars Poverty status is determined by the Census Bureau based on a number of factors including income age family size and number of children in the family Individuals with a disability reported having one or more of the following difficulties hearing vision cognitive ambulatory self care and independent living The categories under period of service are not necessarily mutually exclusive Veterans may have served in more than one period and would be included in the numbers for each era they served Notes were derived from American Community Survey 2011 Subject Definitions

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/mecklenburg-nc-veterans-goodwill-infographic (2016-02-18)
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  • Metro changes affect Charlotte and regions across the country | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    metros was developed from lists used by other local and national organizations but also took into account factors like population size and economic focus to find cities that would be most applicable to Charlotte These metros or MSAs Metropolitan Statistical Areas are established by the Office of Management and Budget based on data from the Census Bureau Each MSA contains a core urban area of 50 000 people or more and consists of the county containing the core urban area and adjacent counties that have a high degree of social and economic integration measured by commuting patterns with the urban core U S Census Bureau Their boundaries are adjusted two to three years after each decennial census The changes based on the 2010 census were just announced in February and Charlotte s MSA grew substantially read more here How did these changes unfold in Charlotte s peer metro areas The following series of maps show how if at all each of the new definitions changed the composition of each peer metro area Select a metro from the drop down box to pull up the associated map Scroll below the map for more information Maps by Zach Szczepaniak Of all of its peers Charlotte experienced the greatest change gaining five counties and losing one for a net gain of four counties For a metro area that previously consisted of six counties that is a substantial change The new definition added counties to the north and south and produced more of a north south alignment that stretches farther into South Carolina than before Atlanta s metro grew by five counties in this latest revision expanding eastward subsuming Athens and the surrounding counties Although this is a greater number than Charlotte added the five added in Atlanta were on top of a metro

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/display/metro-changes-charlotte-peer-cities-2013 (2016-02-18)
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  • Education: Focused efforts start with understanding | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    American 17 percent were Hispanic A slight majority 53 percent were female and about half were between the ages of seven and 11 in the year before entering a United Way program More important the study found that these agencies are reaching the low performing at risk students they seek to serve Before starting a United Way program these students scored below their peers on End of Grade EOG and End of Course EOC tests they struggled with absenteeism and suspensions and the majority attended high poverty schools Specifically only 40 percent were proficient in reading EOGs and 58 percent were proficient in math Among those in high school a little more than 60 percent were proficient in English and math EOCs One third of all participants were absent 10 days or more in the year before entering a United Way funded program and nearly one quarter had been suspended at least once This undertaking is part of United Way s pilot initiative to increase the graduation rate over the next 10 years for the community s most vulnerable youth This data will form the baseline against which United Way and its agencies will be measured in the goal to increase the graduation rate for at risk children being served with United Way support The study was conducted by the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute and used the Institute for Social Capital community database for the demographic and academic performance information Click here for the full report and related presentation Related articles Institute study finds positives for McPIE initiative Oct 01 2015 Report finds strengths challenges in United Way s Collective Impact initiative Sep 30 2015 Charter private home school or CMS Is enrollment shifting Sep 02 2015 Confessions from the cul de sac Aug 05 2015 Teacher turnover rate for

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/education-united-way-collective-impact-baseline-report (2016-02-18)
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  • Preventing high school dropouts: What really works? | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    high school Although the bulk of the identified predictors occur in middle and high school years many scholars point to the early years of child development as the most critical Brain development research over many years shows that conditions and experiences in the first five years of life have significant influence on long term outcomes The achievement gap that emerges in third grade test scores is often already in place by the time children enter kindergarten growing more entrenched with every year Moreover many of what are considered predictors are symptoms of an advanced stage in the dropout process For example chronic absenteeism in middle or high school is often cited as a strong predictor for dropping out But for a student perpetually absent from school dropping out entirely is not a big leap His or her state of chronic absenteeism usually results from the progression of other factors such as disengagement in class uninvolved parents or having a peer group who behave similarly These factors also involve many different aspects of a child s life Some center on the child e g academic achievement or problem behaviors while others are the domain of family e g parent involvement or stressful home environment or community e g high neighborhood poverty or crime Some relate to academic ability such as the ability to read by third grade while others are facets of behavior such as aggressive behavior Still others emerge out of physical health such as low birth weight Click here to see the full list of predictors Research informed dropout prevention programs Although many programs aim to keep children in school few can prove definitively with research that they achieve this goal This research identified programs that have been able to demonstrate success through research studies and then classified them based on the rigor of those studies into three categories well supported programs most rigorous supported programs and promising programs least rigorous Of the hundreds if not thousands of dropout prevention programs across the country only 23 met the standards considered research informed This is not to say only 23 programs effectively reduce the number of dropouts There are undoubtedly many more effective programs but only these 23 have been able to illustrate their efficacy with rigorous research studies Six of these programs are being implemented in Charlotte They are Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Programs NIDCAP in which some individuals in Charlotte are trained Nurse Family Partnership implemented by Care Ring The Incredible Years run by Thompson Child Family Focus Reach Out and Read administered by three pediatric clinics Parents as Teachers implemented by YMCA Communities In Schools Safe Journeys and Children s Home Society Right Start for Life and Big Brothers Big Sisters These model programs all share some critical characteristics They operate in similar environments which tend to be smaller offer more individual attention and impart a sense of belonging to the school community They place great importance on building relationships between children and adults In

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/high-school-dropout-research-collective-impact (2016-02-18)
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  • CMS: Mapping measures of progress and pain | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    5 percent of students graduating in four years Even so over half 20 of the district s high schools showed improvement in their four year cohort graduation rate from the previous year North Mecklenburg High saw the greatest increase from 82 percent in 2009 10 to 89 percent in 2010 11 Cato Middle College maintained its top rank with a graduation rate of over 95 percent West Charlotte the target of the multi million dollar Project L I F T rose from the very bottom to second lowest at 54 3 percent However the school with the lowest rate in 2010 11 E E Waddell is now closed Much of the data in this set of maps update numbers from the set of maps published last year Still there are a couple of new things to note in the 2010 11 maps First the data source for the student proficiency measure has changed In the 2009 10 maps student proficiency was measured using the End of Grade EOG math and reading composite for elementary and middle schools and End of Course EOC composite for high schools In the 2010 11 maps student proficiency is now measured using the ABC Performance Composite which is the percent of EOG EOC test scores in each school that are at or above grade level For elementary and middle schools this includes math reading and science EOG scores For high schools this includes algebra I and II biology civics and economics English I history physical science and writing EOC scores Although the numbers themselves from the two years cannot be directly compared the overall pattern remains mostly the same higher student proficiency at schools in the north south and southern corridor and lower student proficiency across the midsection of the county The pattern starts to break down however when you look at high schools where a number of schools in the midsection have quite high levels of student proficiency In addition four new measures were added for elementary and middle schools All four focus on individual academic growth over the course of a school year The first two show the percent of students who achieved at least one year s worth of growth in reading math regardless of the level where they began the year The second two growth indicators measure the percent of students who began the year on grade level who achieved at least one year s worth of growth in reading math These growth indicators look beneath the blanket of student proficiency and examine which schools are successfully moving students at all levels ahead a full year Even the best elementary schools in terms of student proficiency are having a tough time advancing their students a full year in reading Only three schools Oaklawn Language Academy Chantilly Montessori and Providence Spring broke the 70 percent level On the other hand at Druid Hills which ranks rather low in student proficiency 45 6 percent nearly 85 percent of the students who began the

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/2010-11-cms-data-maps-mecked (2016-02-18)
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  • United Way announces new Collective Impact project | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    among many things coordinating services pooling resources and using a shared set of measures to determine progress A key component of the collective impact program is the use of data to measure the progress of participants and the impact of the group of programs as a whole i e the collective impact The system for maintaining this shared data will be the community database of the Institute for Social Capital ISC which is a UNC Charlotte based nonprofit that aims to foster university social and human capital research and to increase the community s capacity for data based planning and program evaluation The ISC database is housed under the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute Over the coming year the institute will work closely with United Way and Council for Children s Rights to develop a common set of measures that all 15 agencies will maintain plus a set of measures from CMS to gauge participants academic success and progress This ambitious initiative was made possible by a 200 000 grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation For more information about the Collective Impact program click on the links below Read the United Way press release Read the Charlotte Observer story See the WSOC TV story View PowerPoint presented to the United Way board Related articles Institute study finds positives for McPIE initiative Oct 01 2015 Report finds strengths challenges in United Way s Collective Impact initiative Sep 30 2015 Charter private home school or CMS Is enrollment shifting Sep 02 2015 Confessions from the cul de sac Aug 05 2015 Teacher turnover rate for 2013 2014 Jun 19 2015 Donate If you value the work of the UNC Charlotte Institute as we analyze trends in the Charlotte region and the Carolinas consider a tax deductible gift to to help sustain our operations

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/united-way-announces-new-collective-impact-project (2016-02-18)
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  • CMS superintendent survey: budgets, money and trust | UNC Charlotte Urban Institute | UNC Charlotte
    achieving schools was the second most important issue facing the district among African American respondents but did not make the top five for any other racial ethnic group Public trust in CMS leadership was an important issue for groups throughout the county but it was of highest importance among residents of the eastern part of the county 74 percent of respondents from that part of the county listed it as one of the five most pressing issues compared to only 40 to 50 percent of respondents from other parts of the county See map below of regions as defined in this report One other difference worth noting was the greater emphasis high school student respondents placed on technology than did the general survey respondents High school students raised k eeping up with technology as one of the five most important issues facing the district and supports good uses of technology as one of the five most important attitudes they want to see in the next superintendent when neither of these appeared in the top five for teachers or the community at large However despite these occasional differences the overwhelming trend was one of agreement among the various demographic groups For most questions the same or a very similar set of responses appeared in the top five for all demographic groups with slight variation in their order For all of the public division and tension among Charlotte Mecklenburg residents this past year surrounding school closings pay for performance and numerous other controversial issues the findings from this survey suggest that there is actually significant common ground in what people see as the most important issues facing the district and the traits characteristics that should describe the next superintendent The selection process for the new CMS superintendent is clearly an important task for the Charlotte Mecklenburg community Although a difficult undertaking it is also an opportunity for CMS to gain an experienced and transformational leader who has the traits and characteristics needed to carry the district to the next level The findings from this survey suggest that a leader who can build social trust is adept at solving problems and is inclusive in making decisions will serve the district well John Chesser and Laura Simmons Click here for a link to the full survey report Source North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Based on cuts and layoffs in N C public schools since the 2008 09 school year http www ncpublicschools org newsroom news 2011 12 20110831 01 print true Details about the survey The survey was offered in two versions which addressed two target populations current residents of Mecklenburg County at least 18 years of age Community Survey and currently enrolled CMS high school students High School Student Survey The two surveys differed in the demographic information which they sought but the questions concerning CMS issues and the superintendent parameters were identical Within each of the major categories superintendent qualities skills abilities experiences attitudes responsibilities and duties there were several representative

    Original URL path: http://ui.uncc.edu/story/cms-superintendent-survey-charlotte-mecklenburg-schools (2016-02-18)
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