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  • JIMO 2003: Abstract Volume
    Each of the alphabetical groupings contains all the abstracts that have first authors with last names beginning in that group as well as a table of contents listing for that group Preface Abstracts A F Abstracts G O Abstracts P

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/jimo2003/abstractvolume.html (2016-02-15)
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  • 29th DPS Guide to Sessions
    Satellites I Session 13 Moon and Mercury Session 14 Galilean Satellites II Session 15 Saturn Uranus and Neptune Session 16 Jovian Aurorae Session 17 Rings Session 18 Io Torus and Atmosphere Session 19 Jupiter I Session 20 Outer Planet Satellites Session 21 Education Posters Session 22 MSX Posters Session 23 Prize Lectures Session 24 Jupiter II Session 25 Kuiper Belt and Distant Solar System Session 26 Invited Discussion Planets or

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/dps97/html/dps97prg.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Publications and Products
    Us Science Meetings Education Resources Analysis Groups The Moon Publications Meeting Abstracts Meeting Reports Newsletters Last updated June 25 2014 Lunar and Planetary Institute 2016 Site Map Contact Us Privacy

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/ (2016-02-15)
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  • RASC-AL 2002 Advanced Concept Design Presentation
    use of Adobe Acrobat Reader version 3 0 or higher Click here if you need to upgrade TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page and Credits Preface Agenda Scenes from the Forum The Finalists The Teams Other Scenes from the Forum University Design Studies Colorado School of Mines Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Georgia Institute of Technology Howard University Pennsylvania State University Princeton University University of California Berkeley University of California Berkeley University

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/reports/CB-1152/CB-1152.intro.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Fourth Annual HEDS-UP Forum
    Reader version 3 0 or higher Click here if you need to upgrade TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page and Credits Preface Agenda Scenes from the Forum University Design Studies Colorado School of Mines Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Georgia Institute of Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Rowan University University of California Berkeley University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Boulder University of Maryland College Park University

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/reports/CB-1106/CB-1106.intro.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Science and the Human Exploration of Mars (LPI CB#1089)
    Science Organized and Managed by Lunar and Planetary Institute Edited by Michael B Duke Lunar and Planetary Institute LPI Contribution Number 1089 These files are in PDF format and require the use of version 4 0 or higher of Adobe s Acrobat Reader The table of contents is a PDF file with links to each of the individual sections of this report To view the individual files you will simply

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/reports/CB-1089/CB-1089.intro.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Third Annual HEDS-UP Forum
    of Adobe Acrobat Reader version 3 0 or higher Click here if you need to upgrade TABLE OF CONTENTS Title Page and Credits Preface Agenda University Design Studies California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Embry Riddle Aeronautical University Embry Riddle Aeronautical University undergraduate Georgia Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Rowan University Wichita State University University of California Berkeley University of Colorado at Boulder University of Maryland College

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/reports/CB-1063/CB-1063.intro.html (2016-02-15)
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  • Spectroscopy of the Martian Surface: What Next?
    uniquely determine the full range of minerals that may be present as each method is sensitive to different physical processes Together they provide the best capability to identify the surface mineralogy The broader the spectral range the less ambiguous the interpretations and the more technical the justification for selecting a particular landing site Interpretation of current and planned data sets will require access by the community to spectral libraries that contain measurements of materials of interest over the full wavelength range of the spacecraft instruments 0 4 50 µm To facilitate site selection spectral libraries should be expanded and made available to the community On the basis of our extensive experience with laboratory planetary and terrestrial spectroscopy the workshop participants identified the following instrument characteristics required to best select among potential landing sites Spatial resolution of 100 m pixel Targeted coverage Spectral resolution of 10nm for 0 4 2 5 µm and lambda delta lambda 250 for 2 5 50 µm Spectra sampled a minimum of 1 to 2 measurements per resolution element half Nyquist to Nyquist SNR 500rms for 30 albedo at 2 µm and 500 to 1000rms for thermal for 270K As broad a wavelength range as possible High quality calibration Such an instrument would provide an essential tool in the phased approach to Mars exploration that NASA has developed We strongly encourage NASA and the Mars community to consider these recommendations in planning for future missions Sincerely Participants of the workshop Spectroscopy of the Martian Surface What Next Jim Bell Diane Blaney Phil Christensen Ben Clark Roger Clark Stéphane Erard Jack Farmer William Farrand Rudy Hanel Gary Hansen Kennneth Herr Eric Keim Laurel Kirkland Melissa Lane Paul Lucey Richard Morris Scott Murchie John Mustard Carlé Pieters John Salisbury Steve Saunders Allan Treiman Steve Young Recommendations Supporting Research Summary Recommendations Spectroscopic remote sensing of surface composition has been of critical importance to our current understanding of Mars as well as other planets Spectroscopy especially high resolution spectroscopy will continue to be of great importance for future Mars exploration and is particularly important for assessing present and past environments in the search for evidence of life There are two areas that need more emphasis by Research and Analysis Programs 1 Measurement and public archiving of spectra covering the range 0 4 50 µm and 2 Testing of quantitative mineral analysis methods Participants also felt there should be additional discussion of what materials should be measured and how the data should be archived Background On June 10 11 1999 the workshop Spectroscopy of the Martian Surface What Next was held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston TX At this workshop leaders of the planetary community with expertise in spectroscopy and remote mineral identification met to discuss the state of understanding of Mars surface composition and to assess what critical gaps may exist in planned measurements of Mars and supporting research programs This letter summarizes our consensus about the supporting research programs Knowledge of surface composition is an essential tool to assess ancient and modern environments on Mars that may have been conducive to the support and preservation of life and biomarkers Reflectance and emission spectroscopy are the most capable method for remote compositional mapping Participants concluded that there remain several critical needs in the ability of the community in order to reliably interpret current and planned spectral data sets One is the unavailability of supporting spectral libraries that contain diverse measurements over the entire wavelength range measured by current and planned spectrometers 0 4 50 µm Another is the need to test and compare currently available analytical methods that are used to quantitatively examine remotely sensed spectra Laboratory spectra Two factors are essential for detection and quantification of surface materials high information content spectra of Mars and high quality laboratory spectra Participants concluded that a lack of access by the entire community to measurements over the full wavelength range measured by current and planned spectrometers 0 4 50 µm seriously impedes interpretations Measurement of diverse materials relevant to active processes and the environment of Mars over the full wavelength range should be encouraged by current Research and Analysis Programs This community effort will be strongly aided by insuring that there is a community measurement facility capable of measuring the entire 0 4 50 µm range It is essential to the success of this integrated approach that spectral data measured under this program are publicly archived and that the materials measured are well characterized Quantitative methods Workshop participants concluded that there is a strong need to test and evaluate currently available identification and unmixing algorithms An important baseline could be established through blind measurements by different algorithm proponents of prepared samples representing increasing degrees of difficulty Participants also felt quantitative methods will be advanced by the development of liaisons to similar research programs such as those developed by Department of Defense and Intelligence agencies One goal should be to test and incorporate knowledge from these other programs into the NASA community perhaps by inviting them to participate in the blind measurement program Additional discussions Participants concluded there should be additional public discussion of what materials should be measured and how the data should be archived Materials discussed included weathering materials and coatings and poorly crystalline materials that may be present on Mars The workshop did not have the goal of addressing these issues and no consensus was reached but these issues were felt to be of sufficient importance to warrant further discussion Recommendations Selecting among potential landing sites will be aided by measuring targeted high information content spectra from orbit followed by clear unambiguous interpretations of the spectra Community access to measurements over the full wavelength range covered by current and planned instruments and the development and testing of quantitative analysis methods will provide the enabling foundation and data analysis tools that are essential to the phased approach to Mars exploration that NASA has developed We strongly encourage NASA and the Mars community to consider these recommendations in planning

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/science/kirkland/Workshop1/report.html (2016-02-15)
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