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  • Exploration Science Summer Intern Program
    10 week program runs from May 23 2016 through July 29 2016 Selected interns will receive a 5 675 stipend to cover the costs associated with being in Houston for the duration of the program Additionally U S citizens will receive up to 1 000 in travel expense reimbursement and foreign nationals will receive up to 1 500 in travel expense reimbursement The LPI is adjacent to NASA s Johnson Space Center The Johnson Space Center is home to the human exploration program and the integrated robotic and human systems that are being designed to push exploration beyond low Earth orbit The Exploration Science Summer Intern Program is supported by funding from the LPI and the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute at NASA Ames Research Center Eligibility and Selection Criteria College graduate students in geology planetary science and related programs are eligible Selection is based on 1 scholarship curriculum and experience and 2 career objectives and scientific interest All online application information must be received at LPI no later than January 15 2016 Notification of selection will be made by mid March Successful applicants should be prepared to make a decision regarding an offer within 3 days of notification Applicants will be considered for appointment without regard to race creed color sex national origin age handicap status or other nonmerit factors Due to security issues citizens of U S State Department Designated Countries see link under ECP Notices at http oiir hq nasa gov nasaecp are not eligible Application Requirements You will need to apply using the online application form Paper applications will not be accepted Once you begin the application you must complete all of the questions on the form including essay style questions Transcripts and letters of recommendation may be submitted independently but must be received by January 15 2016 for your application to be considered Complete the application form Upon submission you will receive a confirmation e mail with your application number and a link to an online submission form for letters of reference Have three of your professors or other professional colleagues submit online letters of recommendation one of which must verify your student status They will need your application number and the correct spelling of your last name We suggest that you forward the link from the confirmation e mail directly to the individuals you are asking to provide a reference Have your college registrar mail an official transcript to LPI Exploration Science Summer Intern Program Application 3600 Bay Area Boulevard Houston TX 77058 1113 Applications are only accepted using the electronic application form found on this website Questions may be directed to E mail explorationintern lpi usra edu Timeline January 15 2016 Deadline for Application February 29 2016 Notification of selected candidates begins May 23 2016 Program begins July 28 2016 Workshop to LPI JSC science team July 29 2016 Program ends Frequently Asked Questions Is the program open to non U S citizens Yes the program is open to international graduate

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/?view=pubs (2016-02-15)
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  • Exploration Science Summer Intern Program
    10 week program runs from May 23 2016 through July 29 2016 Selected interns will receive a 5 675 stipend to cover the costs associated with being in Houston for the duration of the program Additionally U S citizens will receive up to 1 000 in travel expense reimbursement and foreign nationals will receive up to 1 500 in travel expense reimbursement The LPI is adjacent to NASA s Johnson Space Center The Johnson Space Center is home to the human exploration program and the integrated robotic and human systems that are being designed to push exploration beyond low Earth orbit The Exploration Science Summer Intern Program is supported by funding from the LPI and the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute at NASA Ames Research Center Eligibility and Selection Criteria College graduate students in geology planetary science and related programs are eligible Selection is based on 1 scholarship curriculum and experience and 2 career objectives and scientific interest All online application information must be received at LPI no later than January 15 2016 Notification of selection will be made by mid March Successful applicants should be prepared to make a decision regarding an offer within 3 days of notification Applicants will be considered for appointment without regard to race creed color sex national origin age handicap status or other nonmerit factors Due to security issues citizens of U S State Department Designated Countries see link under ECP Notices at http oiir hq nasa gov nasaecp are not eligible Application Requirements You will need to apply using the online application form Paper applications will not be accepted Once you begin the application you must complete all of the questions on the form including essay style questions Transcripts and letters of recommendation may be submitted independently but must be received by January 15 2016 for your application to be considered Complete the application form Upon submission you will receive a confirmation e mail with your application number and a link to an online submission form for letters of reference Have three of your professors or other professional colleagues submit online letters of recommendation one of which must verify your student status They will need your application number and the correct spelling of your last name We suggest that you forward the link from the confirmation e mail directly to the individuals you are asking to provide a reference Have your college registrar mail an official transcript to LPI Exploration Science Summer Intern Program Application 3600 Bay Area Boulevard Houston TX 77058 1113 Applications are only accepted using the electronic application form found on this website Questions may be directed to E mail explorationintern lpi usra edu Timeline January 15 2016 Deadline for Application February 29 2016 Notification of selected candidates begins May 23 2016 Program begins July 28 2016 Workshop to LPI JSC science team July 29 2016 Program ends Frequently Asked Questions Is the program open to non U S citizens Yes the program is open to international graduate

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/?view=highlights (2016-02-15)
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  • LPI Exploration Science Summer Intern Program, Application Form
    Us Science Meetings Education Resources Analysis Groups 2016 LPI Exploration Science Summer Intern Program Application Form Sorry The application deadline January 15 2016 has passed Lunar and Planetary Institute 2016

    Original URL path: https://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/application/ (2016-02-15)
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  • LPI Exploration Science Summer Intern Program, Reference Form
    Science Summer Intern Program Reference Form Application Information Application Number Student s Last Name Your Personal Contact Information This information may be used to verify your reference Your Full Name Your Title Address Street 1 Street 2 City State Zip Postal Code Country E mail Daytime Phone Your Reference Please briefly describe your relationship to the applicant in the field below Please enter your letter of reference in the field

    Original URL path: https://www.lpi.usra.edu/exploration_intern/reference/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Eugene M. Shoemaker Impact Cratering Award
    the impacts or the geological chemical or biological results of impact cratering Faculty are urged to post flyers about the opportunity in their institutions Students interested in pursuing impact crater studies are encouraged to review the application process and deadlines History of the Endowment The Eugene M Shoemaker Memorial Fund for Crater Studies was established by Dr Carolyn Shoemaker in memory of her husband in 1998 She established the endowment so that students will have an opportunity to pursue studies of impact craters which was the focus of her husband s graduate student studies and a large part of his professional career Friends scientific colleagues and companies have contributed to and continue to contribute to the fund to ensure its success Helping the Endowment Grow Because of the tremendous generosity of Dr Carolyn Shoemaker the endowment fund was large enough for the Planetary Geology Division to make the first student award in 1999 However the division continues to solicit donations to the fund so that it will remain healthy and ideally grow so that it can be used to support additional student activities If you would like to make a gift in Gene Shoemaker s memory and to support students

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/science/kring/Awards/Shoemaker_Award/ (2016-02-15)
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  • The Barringer Family Fund for Meteorite Impact Research
    of research samples and findings Masters doctoral and post doctoral students enrolled in formal university programs are eligible Applications to the Fund will be due by April 8 2016 with notification of grant awards by June 10 2016 Additional details of the awards and the application process can be found above The Barringer Family Fund for Meteorite Impact Research has been established as a memorial to recognize the contributions of

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/science/kring/Awards/Barringer_Fund/ (2016-02-15)
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  • LPI Seminar Series
    it tell us about the formation of our Solar System the planets how Earth formed It is rare for the cultural value of meteorites to be the focus although there are a few examples The Camel Charm is a meteoritic artifact acquired by the National Meteorite Collection at the Smithsonian s National Museum of Natural History in 1974 It has never been studied The Charm is made from an iron meteorite with an average Ni content of 7 8 which is identical within error to a previously identified meteorite called Wabar It is possible that the Camel Charm represents a piece of Wabar that was traded to the Ababda in Egypt from its original home in Saudia Arabia The Camel Charm is a unique meteorite from an ethnographic standpoint with a very interesting history It is valuable addition to the National Meteorite Collection Friday February 19 2016 Lecture Hall 3 30 PM Nicolas LeCorvec Lunar and Planetary Institute Effects of mechanical rheological and tectonic controls on the formation of giant radial dike systems on Venus Insights from finite element modeling Radial dike systems are intriguing magmato tectonic features occurring on Venus Earth and Mars For such systems to form massive quantities of magma ascending from the mantle must be redirected laterally at shallow depths within the lithosphere over several hundred kilometers Observations have shown different patterns from continuous fanning to subswarms of subparallel dikes As magma ascends towards the surface accumulation in reservoirs situated at various depths within the lithosphere is often coupled with the growth of a volcanic edifice at the surface The stability of magma reservoirs and therefore the generation of magmatic intrusions is influenced by their shape their location the tectonic environment and the mechanical and rheological properties of the lithosphere Based on previous work investigating the role of flexure on the stability of magma reservoirs we developed new models to test 1 the role of a mechanically layered lithosphere 2 the role of extensional stresses and 3 the ellipticity of magmatic reservoirs on the formation of these radial dike systems To explore these scenarios we used the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element package allowing us to develop 1 2D axisymmetric elastic models made of mantle and crustal components 2 3D elastic models in which an extensional stress was applied and 3 elliptical magmatic reservoirs embedded within 2D axisymmetric elastoplastic models Different tectonic environments were studied lithostatic upward flexure due to uplift consistent with a plume derived origin and downward flexure due to the load of a volcanic edifice Mechanical layering within the lithosphere impacts the location of failure along a magmatic reservoir and the type of magmatic intrusions We observe that shallow magma reservoirs in an upward flexure environment tend to produce radial dikes Regional Extensional stresses in 3D tend to focus the location of failure along the magma reservoir therefore limiting the formation of continuous fanning pattern Finally the elliptical shape of a magma reservoir favors continued expansion and increasing ellipticity because failure at the midsection

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lpi/seminars/?y=2016 (2016-02-15)
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  • LPI Seminar Series
    minerals formed and were subsequently altered gives vital clues to the history of aqueous conditions on the surface in Mars past In collaboration with scientists at the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science ARES lab at Johnson Space Center I have been conducting experiments that investigate the effects of acid sulfate weathering on phyllosilicates with implications for the aqueous history of Mars In my work I aim to further understand the global climatic transition from the Noachian to the Hesperian eras on Mars in terms of volatile content in the crust In this presentation I will discuss some of my laboratory experiments constraining sulfate formation on the martian surface the implications for these formation processes on the history of water on Mars and discuss potential collaborations with scientists at ARES Friday May 29 2015 Lecture Hall 3 30 PM Simon Kattenhorn ConocoPhillips Subduction on Jupiter s Moon Europa The Case for Plate Tectonics in the Ice Shell Jupiter s icy moon Europa has one of the youngest planetary surfaces in the Solar System implying rapid recycling by some mechanism Despite ubiquitous extension and creation of new surface area at dilational bands that resemble terrestrial mid ocean spreading zones there is little evidence of large scale contraction to balance the observed extension or to recycle aging terrains We address this enigma by presenting several lines of evidence that subduction may be recycling surface material into the interior of Europa s ice shell Using Galileo spacecraft images we produce a tectonic reconstruction of geologic features across a 134 000 km2 region of Europa and find in addition to dilational band spreading evidence for transform motions along prominent strike slip faults as well as the removal of approximately 20 000 km2 of the surface along a discrete tabular zone We interpret this zone as a subduction like convergent boundary that abruptly truncates older geological features and is flanked by potential cryolavas on the overriding ice We propose that Europa s ice shell has a brittle mobile plate like system above convecting warmer ice Hence Europa may be the only Solar System body other than Earth to exhibit a system of plate tectonics These observations are in agreement with theoretical considerations that suggested the plausibility of convection driven plate tectonics on Europa given its interior shell viscosity thickness and thermal structure June 2015 Friday June 5 2015 Lecture Hall 3 30 PM Christian Klimczak University of Georgia Tectonic Geomorphology as a Tool to Understand the Structural Geologic History of the Moon The Moon hosts several types of large scale tectonic landforms that are indicative of both extensional and contractional tectonic deformation High resolution data returned from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter LRO and Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory GRAIL missions allow us to assess these landforms in great detail Extensional deformation is evident as large troughs that are interpreted to be graben structures Grabens on Earth are generally found in rift settings but also form as surface expressions of dike intrusions Whether or not a graben is accompanied by a dike can be determined by a detailed analysis of their tectonic geomorphology Contractional deformation on the other hand is manifest as prominent ridges the largest of which are spatially associated with mare filled impact basins Ridges are believed to be the surface expression of one or more shallowly dipping thrust faults with the ridge morphology representative of the thrust fault architecture at depth The size and geometry of the landforms correlates with the size and geometry of the tectonic structures producing the landform and so their morphologic characterization coupled with numerical modeling provide a detailed set of observations and interpretations for deformation in the lunar subsurface In this talk I will show where large scale graben are found to be associated with dike intrusions and where mare ridges have been produced by large thrust faults that deeply penetrate the lunar lithosphere These results increase our understanding of the regional and global tectonic evolution of our Moon in a quantitative manner Friday June 26 2015 Lecture Hall 3 30 PM Cyrena Anne Goodrich Planetary Science Institute Almahata Sitta and Other Polymict Ureilites and Why They Are So Important Almahata Sitta is the first meteorite observed to originate from an asteroid 2008 TC3 that had been tracked and studied in space before it hit Earth providing an unprecedented opportunity to correlate properties of an asteroid with properties of the rocks derived from it Almahata Sitta is also unique because the fallen fragments include a wide variety of different meteorite types Approximately 70 belong to the ureilite group of achondrites and 30 are various types of chondrites including all major classes ordinary enstatite carbonaceous and also R chondrites Almahata Sitta has been classified as an anomalous polymict ureilite However maybe it is not so anomalous Previously known typical polymict ureilites also contain a wide variety of foreign clast types In this regard all polymict ureilites differ from most other meteoritic breccias in which the sole foreign clasts are CC matrix like dark clasts The foreign clasts in polymict ureilites represent at least 7 different parent asteroids and a wide range of chemical and isotopic environments in the early solar system How did all these materials become mixed with fragments of ureilites in a single asteroid and why is this process of mixing not apparent in most other meteorites I will discuss several hypotheses and their disparate implications for early solar system processes July 2015 Friday July 24 2015 Lecture Hall 3 30 PM Jonathan Craig University of Arkansas Thermoluminesence Analysis of Micrometer Fragments of Primitive Extraterrestrial Materials Extraterrestrial materials such as the matrix from un equilibrated ordinary chondrites UOCs and Antarctic micrometeorites AMMs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials and as such they retain a memory of early solar system formation processes There are many techniques which can determine the mineralogical petrological or compositional information about extraterrestrial materials Few of these however can provide the insight into the history of a material that is possible with

    Original URL path: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/lpi/seminars/?y=2015 (2016-02-15)
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