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  • Open Access and Public Domain | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    Tools Advisory Committee Contact Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us Email LSS lss uwc edu You are here Home Library Home Copyright Open Access and Public Domain Open access and public access represent ways of making publications available to as wide an audience as possible Open access refers to digital materials that are free from copyright or licensing restrictions and that are accessible over the internet Authors retain copyright and determine any limitations to use but at minimum the public is free to download print link to and use these materials Open access publications are deposited into digital repositories committed to the principles of open and perpetual access unlimited distribution and interoperability The concept of public access shares many of the goals of Open Access but it refers to work that has been funded by the federal government or to documents published by branches of government Public access dates to 1813 when Congress decided to make the work of the government available to its citizens See the Government Printing Office for more information Materials within the public domain are either ineligible for copyright protection or their copyright has expired U S government publications are an example of items that are not eligible for copyright protection No permission is required to use public domain works They can be posted on the web repackaged and sold or given away to others Project Gutenberg collects and makes available works with expired copyrights More information about open access OA SPARC the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition is an international alliance of academic and research libraries dedicated to creating a more open system for sharing scholarly research results Provides information on OA to a variety of constituencies including libraries administrators publishers researchers and students Open Access Directory A wiki compendium of simple factual lists about open access to science and scholarship Includes a timeline that identifies key moments in the evolution of OA Copyright retention Author retention of copyright is a key concept to open access The Scholar s Copyright Addendum Engine will generate a PDF form that can be attached to a journal publisher s copyright agreement in order to ensure that the author retains certain rights Additional copyright addendums are available from other sites listed here Massachusetts Institute of Technology Faculty Initiative on Open Access On March 18 2009 the MIT faculty voted unanimously to make their work openly accessible through MIT s Dspace repository This blog was created to support faculty information needs about OA especially concerning rights retention AAUP American Association of University Publishers statement on open access Elsevier a STEM publisher comments on the implications of open access publishing in the UK A rebuttal of many of the arguments made by advocates for open access but specific to the UK Students for Free Culture is an international chapter based student organization that promotes the public interest in intellectual property and information and communications technology policy Open Access Repositories Open Access Journals A directory of

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/open-access (2016-02-16)
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  • Creative Commons | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Campus Policies Committee Lists UWC Library Council Contact Us Help LSS Contacts Instructor FAQs Student FAQs Library Contacts Staff Directory News Library Menu Resources Services Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Contact Us Help News Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us Email LSS lss uwc edu You are here Home Library Home Copyright Creative Commons Creative Commons is an alternative to traditional copyright developed by a nonprofit organization of the same name By default most original works are protected by copyright which confers specific rights regarding use and distribution Creative Commons allows copyright owners to release some of those rights while retaining others with the goal of increasing access to and sharing of intellectual property Copyright has historically been an all or nothing proposition a work is either in the public domain or its owner asserts all rights reserved The term of copyright protection for most works has stretched considerably from 14 years in 1790 when copyright law was first enacted in the United States to 70 years past the death of the work s creator Seeing the need for options besides public domain and all rights reserved the creators of Creative Commons sought to establish a middle ground of some rights

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/creative-commons (2016-02-16)
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  • Fair Use | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Campus Policies Committee Lists UWC Library Council Contact Us Help LSS Contacts Instructor FAQs Student FAQs Library Contacts Staff Directory News Library Menu Resources Services Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Contact Us Help News Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us Email LSS lss uwc edu You are here Home Library Home Copyright Fair Use The fair use exception provides the opportunity for individuals to use copyrighted material for limited purposes without prior permission Some of these purposes are research parody commentary criticism and transformation of the work There are no hard and fast rules that decide fair use instead each potential use must be measured against four factors that reveal whether permission is needed or not These four factors are purpose of use nature of use amount used and market impact Use the following links for more information about fair use and the four factors The Fair Use Exception in the U S Code 17 U S C 107 Cornell University s Legal Information Institute Everything you want to know about Fair Use from the University of Texas University System of Georgia Fair Use Exception page A dozen

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/fair-use (2016-02-16)
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  • Kinds of Content | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Campus Policies Committee Lists UWC Library Council Contact Us Help LSS Contacts Instructor FAQs Student FAQs Library Contacts Staff Directory News Library Menu Resources Services Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Contact Us Help News Copyright Digital Millennium Copyright Act UW Colleges Copyright Policy 53 TEACH Act Open Access and Public Domain Creative Commons Fair Use Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/kinds-of-content (2016-02-16)
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  • Books and Articles | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    and Permissions Resources and Tools Advisory Committee Contact About Us Contact Us Help News Kinds of Content Books and Articles Course Packets DVDs and Videos E Reserves and D2L Images Music Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us Email LSS lss uwc edu You are here Home Library Home Copyright Kinds of Content Books and Articles FAQs What is the public domain What is the length of copyright Some things are never under copyright You can t copyright ideas only their expression You can t copyright facts titles names short phrases or slogans although some are protected through patents or trademarks There is not copyright on work created by United States federal government employees if that work is created as a direct result of their jobs The public domain includes all of the above plus older works where the copyright has expired and anything that s not in a tangible medium of expression such as an extemporaneous speech that remains unrecorded Figuring out the length of copyright can be tricky and the length of copyright keeps extending At the moment it is the life of the author plus 70 years with exceptions In those cases the length of copyright is 95 years from the date of first publication or 120 years from the date of creation whichever expires first Copyright renewal can lengthen things further In the United States if it s published before 1923 you can safely consider it to be in the public domain See Cornell s copyright term and the public domain in the United States I want to use an article in my class How do I figure out fair use There are four factors to consider individually and then as a whole purpose

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/kinds-of-content/books-articles (2016-02-16)
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  • Course Packets | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    Photocopies Software Student Work Website Content and Permissions Contact a Librarian Contact Information Chat is offline use Contact us Email LSS lss uwc edu You are here Home Library Home Copyright Kinds of Content Course Packets Course packets are the custom educational materials that many faculty members publish to supplement or replace textbooks They contain combinations of original manuscripts published journal articles book excerpts photographs or illustrations These photocopied materials enable students to read from a wide variety of sources without having to purchase a large number of books By the late 1980s book publishers realized they were losing sales owing to such photocopying As a result several publishers including Basic Books Inc filed a lawsuit in federal court against one of the largest photocopy firms in the United States Kinko s Graphics Corporation a company that in 1989 had more than two hundred locations and annual sales of 54 million The court found that Kinko s was guilty of copyright infringement It ordered the company to pay 500 000 in damages to the publishers and issued an order forbidding it to prepare anthologies without securing permission from and prepaying fees to the appropriate publishers Below is a very brief question and answer followed by links to websites concerning copyright law and course packets If your concerns are not addressed you are encouraged to contact your campus librarian FAQs Do I need permission if I am making copies to distribute to my class Educational use alone is insufficient to make a use in question a fair one The copying will fall within the fair use guidelines noted above if it meets agreed standards of spontaneity brevity and cumulative effect and each copy includes a notice of copyright A good example of legal copying could be if a professor reads an article in the morning newspaper and distributes it in class that afternoon However any reuse of the article in a subsequent semester without first receiving permission would not be covered by the guidelines The cumulative effect means that fair use is limited as to the length occasions and frequency of work copied Full chapters or other substantial excerpts from copyrighted documents require permission before copying Why do I need permission if I wrote the article or book The author of the book is not necessarily the owner of the copyright since the copyright protects both the content and the image of the content If the publisher by contract holds the particular rights for reproduction then for uses that do not fall under fair use guidelines the author should contact the publisher The publisher can provide a letter granting permission and acknowledging that the article will be included in the packet for sale If the book is out of print is permission needed Yes Just because the book is out of print does not mean that the work is no longer protected by copyright Copyright protection lasts for the life of the rights holder plus 75 years It is best to

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/kinds-of-content/course-packets (2016-02-16)
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  • DVDs and Videos | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    the Fair Use exemptions of the Copyright Act apply to various types of audiovisual works and movies Generally speaking public performance rights are required in advance of showing feature films outside of the classroom For example student groups wanting to show a Hollywood movie on campus i e public viewing must obtain in advance necessary performance rights to that film Companies like Swank Motion Pictures the Motion Picture Licensing Corporation and Kit Parker are licensed by selected Hollywood studios or other non theatrical film companies to distribute returnable copies of films to groups on campuses throughout the US Fees vary but generally range from 100 500 per film With regard to documentary or instructional films they are generally protected by the Fair Use provision for viewings in class however campus libraries often purchase copies of these films that include public performance rights for any group or individual at that institution Check with your campus librarian about performance rights to documentary films FAQs When can the format be changed For example from VHS to DVD or streaming media Only in limited circumstances Format changes are not defined as a Fair Use exemption of Section 107 of Title 17 and do not qualify as lawful reproduction under 108 either In the event that a VHS video is lost stolen damaged or is on an obsolete format such as laser disc beta of 3 4 tape and the video is not available on DVD at a reasonable cost a library can make a digital copy The digital copy however can be only used in house and cannot be distributed off campus e g via Interlibrary Loan Under what conditions can I show a video to a class of students In general showing a video to students during class falls under the Fair Use copyright exemption as long as these conditions apply the class is meeting face to face in a classroom setting and the video shown has been legally acquired Find more information at the American Library Association site Some students will be watching a copyrighted movie in a lounge in a campus residence hall Is this legal The UW System General Counsel answered this question in an FAQ To summarize it depends If the movie watchers are a small group of friends watching a movie in someone s room the situation may be legal If the public has been invited to watch the movie and admission is charged fair use no longer applies Those showing the film will need to get permission from the copyright holder For more information see the links below under Public Performance and Licensing Organizations A faculty records a PBS program or A E Learning Channel etc Are there limitations on its use Yes According to Stanford University s Fair Use website the recording can be used only within a ten day window and it must be erased after 45 days For more information Online video American University School of Communication Center for Social Media Code of Best

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/kinds-of-content/dvd-video (2016-02-16)
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  • E-Reserves and D2L | University of Wisconsin Colleges
    FAQs Can I insert portions of films music plays novels poetry readings etc on my class Web site The Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization Act TEACH Act permits instructors under certain conditions to post media on their websites for distance learning purposes This permission is restricted to content that would be presented in a face to face classroom and not supplementary material that is assigned as homework The University of Wisconsin System Office of Academic Affairs discusses this question in an FAQ Columbia University Libraries provides a summary of the TEACH Act and helpful links I am able to access articles using the digital and lending resources available on campus Can I make these articles available to my students as a digital course packet if it is password protected Licenses for most library subscription databases and e journals allow linking to each article from within our course management system Desire2Learn If in doubt check with your campus librarian As digital sources become easier to access what can and cannot be used for classes Ex Can I have students read online textbooks instead of having them buy textbooks Generally digital sources which are purchased by the institution may be used by faculty and currently registered students and are accessed via a login and password Some publishers are now offering online or electronic versions of their textbooks however they are usually not free For copyrighted digital sources not purchased by the institution permission must be sought from the copyright holder before using the materials in class Can I place multiple chapters from a book on electronic reserve For multiple chapters of a book to be placed on e reserve permission should first be sought from the publisher Can I put a textbook on reserve if my textbook order didn t arrive by the start of classes Yes if the physical textbook to be placed on reserve was appropriately acquired I am teaching the same course next semester Can I just leave all of my reserves electronic reserves on for the following semester Check with your campus librarian to determine if you may use your specific reserves for an additional semester Policies differ depending upon the source of the material and on fair use policy An instructor wants her students to read a full article in PDF format from an online journal to which the college library subscribes Can he save the article to her computer and then upload it to her D2L site for students to download The instructor does not need to get permission from the copyright holder if she posts a link in the form of a permanent URL to the article on her D2L site Most libraries advise their faculty members not to download articles unless they have permission from the copyright holder The University of Minnesota Libraries discusses this issue among their Copyright Scenarios and also provides instruction about finding the permanent URL to articles licensed by libraries Websites Can I simply link to another web site without

    Original URL path: http://www.uwc.edu/library/copyright/kinds-of-content/e-reserves-d2l (2016-02-16)
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