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  • Virginia Military Institute - Cheating, Lying, and Honor: VMI Conference to Open Dialogue
    24450 Cheating Lying and Honor VMI Conference to Open Dialogue LEXINGTON Va Jan 9 2012 In classrooms homes and dorm rooms across the country students are tested They face multiple choices on exam sheets and in their daily lives For many students the most challenging question is this To cheat or not to cheat The VMI Center for Leadership and Ethics host of the 2012 VMI Leadership Conference Cheating Lying and Honor in America s High Schools Colleges and Universities seeks to open a dialogue among educators and students We ve talked to experts who have been conducting scholarly research on the psychology of academic cheating and have come to find out how complex the problem is said Capt Susan Rabern director of the Virginia Military Institute Center for Leadership and Ethics We ve learned that in order to reverse the problem it will require the engagement of not just faculty and staff but also students as peers The conference which will be held March 5 and 6 is geared toward high school and college faculty staff and students including honor councils and honor societies The agenda for the conference includes presentations by educational psychologist Eric Anderman David Callahan author of The Cheating Culture Why More Americans are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead James Stewart author of Tangled Webs How False Statements are Undermining America From Martha Stewart to Bernie Madoff and Medal of Honor recipient Staff Sgt Salvatore Giunta Kathleen Rice Nassau County N Y district attorney who is currently prosecuting an SAT cheating case will also address the conference Rabern said the focus of the biennial conference on the epidemic of cheating in America s high schools colleges and universities originated with members of VMI s Honor Court We began the planning in the spring of 2011 she

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737420411 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - U.S., China, Africa an ‘Expanding Circle’
    s The Eagle and the Dragon in Africa conference It s a mistake to say we are engaged in a new competition for mineral and petroleum resources Carson who is assistant secretary of state for African affairs with the U S Department of State acknowledged that the United States should follow China s growing role in Africa very carefully for a number of reasons but cautioned against an alarmist or apprehensive response especially since China s influence and actions in Africa vary from sector to sector and country to country Carson also pointed out that China has developed relations in Africa in the diplomatic and political realm but hasn t tried to establish a permanent military presence or undermine African governments A more reasoned view of China would be one that recognizes the country s astronomical population and economic growth and by extension its logical need to procure energy resources and other commodities Carson alluded to statistics from 1997 that put a 5 billion price tag on Chinese African trade By 2008 that number was 107 billion while in 2010 it had reached 115 billion placing China just ahead of the United States as Africa s biggest single trade partner Carson said Since Africa is the last global economic frontier it s only natural for countries like China among many others to look to Africa for economic and political opportunities similar to the way the United States considers growth in Africa a core foreign policy objective What s more Carson noted the United States remains the dominant player in the development and production of oil in Africa where China remains a relative newcomer And not a single African country ranks as one of China s top 10 suppliers or import destinations Oftentimes China s actions in Africa are not in

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419972 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - United States and China Cooperating and Competing
    the Michael S Ansari Africa Center at the Atlantic Council and David Shinn adjunct professor at the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University It was chaired by Col Jim Hentz professor of international studies at Virginia Military Institute Shinn noted the range of common goals that the United States and China have in Africa Both nations encourage economic development promote stability in government and seek to defeat terrorist organizations If the United States and China s interests in China overlap then there can be collaboration said Shinn Shinn went on to enumerate areas in which there is room for collaboration between the United States and China including United Nations peacekeeping missions promoting health initiatives and supporting agricultural development Despite the opportunities and shared interests Shinn noted that influence in Africa is shifting in China s favor The West due in large part to budgetary constraints is either holding steady or even scaling back in Africa while China and some other countries continue to press forward on all fronts said Shinn Chinese influence grows while Western influence is static and in some cases even in decline Recognizing the potential benefits to African nations of functioning relationships with the United States and with China Pham noted that African nations should steer the development of those relationships I would emphasize the need for African agency said Pham It s not about just what America is doing for Africa or what China is doing We have to engage Africans as actors African governments and civil society sectors within those nations and bring them into this dialogue Pham warned of looking at China or the United States as monoliths pointing out that the influence of both the China and the United States in Africa is a result of the sum of actions

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419975 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - Complexity Daunting to Understand and Mitigate Conflict in Africa
    the effects of conflict and prevention of conflict Addressing the first Dr Reuben Brigety deputy assistant secretary of the Bureau of Population Refugees and Migration in the U S Department of State gave a broad overview of the population currently in need of care and the challenges the bureau faces and the strategies it employs in efforts to meet that need Though the number of refugees those who cross international borders to find safety has decreased over the last 15 years the number of internally displaced people also known as IDPs who have left their homes to find safety but remain in their home countries has doubled in that time Which means that broadly speaking the number of IDPs that we are concerned about all around the world is increased dramatically largely as a result of an increase in non international armed conflict or other sorts of disturbances said Brigety This kind of conflict is the dominant kind of war in Africa said VMI s own Col Jim Hentz professor of international studies who followed Brigety on stage International wars he said are rare in Africa civil wars where a group challenges the government or attempts to secede are also rare But wars in Africa are not simply random inexplicable violence they follow a pattern Hentz calls wars across states they tend to take place on the periphery of weak states and spread across borders they may or may not involve the government participants may be militia groups and other hybrids and there is no linear progression from war to state as took place during the formation of the nations of Europe These wars across states may be prolonged as in the Democratic Republic of Congo which Hentz said has been at war since 1996 and is no closer to statehood than at the start of the fighting Every refugee situation in the world is either precipitated or prolonged by armed conflict Brigety had pointed out And these wars generate apparently even greater numbers of internally displaced people than refugees For IDPs generally speaking the host government still has responsibility for protecting them even if it is from the host government that they flee And they aren t protected by international law in the same way that refugees are making the job of his bureau and other agencies seeking to mitigate the effects of these conflicts more difficult said Brigety Even for refugees durable solutions return to safety in the home country integration in the adopted country or resettlement in a third country are extremely difficult to achieve Brigety said The United States he said is the largest resettlement country in the world by far but even so only a small percentage the most vulnerable are resettled Hentz and Brigety offered the audience an understanding of the big picture of war and peace in Africa while discussant Anna Linn Persson brought the perspective of the situation on the ground in the DRC where she works as senior civilian observer for

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419967 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - People Key to Sustainable Development in Africa
    panel session in VMI s The Eagle and the Dragon in Africa conference presented an in depth presentation on efforts of the United States Agency for International Development and a more discursive discussion of the need to engage with the African peoples both focused on U S approaches to sustainable development in Africa All four panelists touched on the theme that involvement of the African people is essential Panel chair Dr Paul Hebert opened the discussion with a comment on where to start in the international efforts toward sustainable development There is one platform that could provide a forum for cooperation between China and the United States he said and that is the international forum related to the Millennium Development Goals that have been established through the United Nations and endorsed by all of the U N member states including China and the United States These goals are to end poverty and hunger to have universal education to achieve gender equality child health maternal health to combat HIV and AIDS and to achieve in those goals environmental sustainability and then to have a platform for global partnerships said Hebert who was the recipient last spring VMI s Jonathan Daniels Humanitarian Award for his humanitarian work much of which took placed under the auspices of the United Nations Hebert established the need for sustainable development noting that 26 of the 54 countries in Africa rank in the lowest group on the Human Development Index in which the bottom 10 are all African countries Hebert defined sustainable development as a pattern of resource use that aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment a definition further developed by U S Army Lt Col Nancy Jean Louis who noted that this kind of development requires that the world be seen as a system a responsibility of civil society as a whole shared by governments citizens institutions academia and public and private organizations During her detailed description of the USAID efforts and successes Jean Louis said the agency was a prime beneficiary of the work of the U S Africa Command founded in 2008 for which she is the representative to USAID Without security development is just not going to be sustainable because you will lose your gains she said Echoing Jean Louis remark that development is the responsibility of civil society as a whole Christopher LaMonica associate professor of comparative politics at the U S Coast Guard Academy opened his talk by echoing the elephant metaphor first explored in an earlier panel session The issue is engaging the elephant he said We re going to have to speak to the Africans to determine their needs and the best use of our limited resources The African peoples he noted remember U S Cold War era policies in Africa proxy wars support of dictatorships and conditionality We supported monsters he said and civil society in Africa suffered as a result Citing several case study countries LaMonica noted that the other elephant in the room

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419962 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - U.S., Chinese Roles in Africa Offer Danger, Potential
    discussion of VMI s The Eagle and the Dragon in Africa conference on Nov 3 The session put questions on the table for the conference participants to consider There is a saying that when two elephants fight the grass suffers said Sheila Siwela ambassador of the Republic of Zambia to the United States When two elephants don t fight the grass grows Narcisse Tiky assistant professor in residence at the University of Connecticut Storrs and research associate at the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University expanded on the metaphor I would like to say that when two elephants fight all the sheep go to stay away said Tiky They stay away and wait for the fight to be over so that the sheep will actually come and pick up the pieces Is that what s happening in Africa Joining Siwela and Tiky in the discussion was Soji Adelaja professor of land policy and director of the Land Policy Institute at Michigan State University The discussion was chaired by Donald Sparks professor of international economics in the School Of Business Administration at the Citadel Siwela highlighted the different roles that China and the United States have traditionally played in Africa with the United States investing in social and educational programs and China investing in infrastructure Adelaja acknowledged the range of benefits that have been brought to Africa but focused his comments on the motivations that China has for investment in Africa He explained the extreme ends of those motivations on one end is an altruistic interest in the development of Africa and on the other is a neo colonial interest in exploiting Africa s resources China s motivations lie somewhere between these extremes and those motivations are driven by the increasing demands of the Chinese people

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419951 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - U.S., China Have Complementary Roles in Africa
    Eagle and the Dragon in Africa an academic conference at Virginia Military Institute s Center for Leadership and Ethics pointed at what was most striking in keynote remarks presented by an ambassador for the U S Office of the Secretary of Defense and a fellow with the Center for Global Development The view that emerged from the presentations was that China is neither a competitor in the arena of security nor a deathly threat in that of economics Vicki Huddleston deputy assistant secretary for Africa and Todd Moss vice president for programs and senior fellow at the Center for Global Development painted a nuanced picture of the emerging roles of the two countries and the developing relations between them for the audience which included a large contingent of VMI cadets Huddleston stated the goals of the United States in Africa to promote democracy economic development and rule of law and to mitigate conflict She gave strong praise to the efforts of the relatively new U S Africa Command which she said is providing the capacity to Africans to African states to African militaries so they can provide security and stability for their population so that they can be able to counter the transnational threat of terrorism What AFRICOM does is build capacity of African militaries under civilian command These goals are not according to Huddleston shared by China From the security point of view China isn t a competitor it isn t even there China and the United States do however have shared interests My point to you would be that China and ourselves share the same goal in Africa the goal being Democracy writ large certainly economic development and cultural relations but where we differ I believe is in the means Moss who followed Huddleston on stage noted that in the economic arena China is extremely active and he accounted for the sense of tension between the United States and China by adding that globally the two countries are also the two largest economies tied together by both trade and debt Reassuringly he added It sometimes seems like we re competing but it s mostly a mutual hostage situation In Africa both China and the United States want to see much more vibrant and productive African markets markets much more integrated in the global economy Both the United States and China he said have very important roles to play in Africa which is one of the engines of economic growth Six out of 10 of the fastest growing economies this year globally are in Africa he said The biggest constraints to growth in Africa are the cost and reliability of electricity and transportation Also needed are access to financing and regulatory structures In addressing these constraints Moss said the actions of the United States and China are often complementary The United States tends to assist in development of regulatory structures and to invest in human capital in schools and education and a healthier work force The Chinese have a

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419949 (2016-02-15)
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  • Virginia Military Institute - Taps – Capt. Ronald A. Erchul
    Symposium He had huge ideas said Col Ned Riester head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering He was always dragging cadets on field trips to mines or caves I never heard him say a bad thing about anybody He always looked to the positive Captain Ronald A Erchul Capt Ronald Anton Erchul 73 of Rockbridge County was called home to be with his Lord on Saturday Oct 8 2011 Captain Erchul taught geology and civil engineering at the Virginia Military Institute for 27 years following 20 years of active duty in the U S Navy He retired from VMI in 2008 and pursued his love of farming on his land along South Buffalo Creek He is survived by his wife Beverly A Erchul and one daughter Maria B Erchul of Fairfax County Va He was preceded in death by one daughter Deborah A Erchul and by his parents Anton and Agnes Erchul He grew up in West Allis Wis A 1961 graduate of the U S Naval Academy Erchul earned his master s degree from the Naval Postgraduate School and his Ph D from the University of Rhode Island in ocean engineering While on active duty in the U S Navy 1961 1981 he served as a ship driver a construction scuba diver an executive officer and an operations officer His last tour of duty was at the U S Naval Academy where he taught ocean engineering While a midshipman at the Naval Academy he was the starting right tackle on the 1960 football team that finished fourth in the land and earned a berth in the 1961 Orange Bowl Erchul was recognized as an important environmental leader in Virginia In 1990 he founded the Environment Virginia Symposium an annual statewide event which continues to attract over 700

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Content.aspx?id=10737419589 (2016-02-15)
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