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  • Stonewall Jackson Biographical Summary. A Timeline of Significant Events from the VMI Archives.
    1846 June Full text letters from this period Jackson attended the United States Military Academy at West Point Jackson was not the first choice for his congressional district s appointment but the top applicant withdrew from the academy after only one day Jackson graduated in June 1846 standing 17th out of 59 graduates Jackson began his U S Army career as a 2nd Lt First Artillery Regiment In 1844 Jackson s beloved sister Laura married Jonathan Arnold 1846 1851 Full text letters from this period United States Army officer Served in the Mexican War 1846 1848 stationed at Carlisle Barracks PA Ft Hamilton NY Ft Meade FL 1851 1861 April Full text letters from this period In the spring of 1851 Jackson was offered and accepted the appointment to teach at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington Virginia he resigned from the army Reported for duty at VMI on August 13 1851 He taught natural and experimental philosophy related to modern day physics and including physics astronomy acoustics optics and other scientific courses On August 4 1853 Jackson married Elinor Junkin 1825 1854 daughter of Dr George Junkin President of Washington College and Julia Miller Junkin Elinor Ellie died in childbirth on October 22 1854 Their child a son was stillborn During the summer of 1856 Jackson toured Europe visiting Belgium France Germany Switzerland England and Scotland On July 16 1857 Jackson married for the second time His wife was Mary Anna Morrison 1831 1915 daughter of Robert Hall Morrison and Mary Graham Morrison Mary Anna s family resided in North Carolina her father was the retired President of Davidson College Mary Anna gave birth to a daughter Mary Graham on April 30 1858 the baby died less than a month later on May 25 In November 1859 Jackson was one of the VMI officers who accompanied a contingent of VMI cadets to Harper s Ferry where they stood guard at the execution of abolitionist John Brown 1861 1863 Full text letters from this period April 21 1861 the VMI Corps of Cadets was ordered to Richmond to serve as drillmasters for new army recruits Jackson was placed in command of the cadets April 27 1861 Gov John Letcher ordered Col Jackson to take command at Harper s Ferry where he organized the troops that would soon comprise the famous Stonewall Brigade 2nd 4th 5th 27th and 33rd Virginia Infantry Regiments Rockbridge Artillery all were from the Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia July 1861 Promoted to Brigadier General Battle of 1st Manassas where he acquired the legendary nickname Stonewall Look there stands Jackson like a stone wall October 1861 Promoted to Major General Placed in command of the Valley of Virginia Shenandoah Valley 1862 May June Jackson s brilliant Shenandoah Valley Campaign victories at Front Royal Winchester Cross Keys and Port Republic Following the successful campaign Jackson was ordered to join Gen Lee in the Peninsula Eastern Virginia 1862 June 15 July 1 Seven Days Battles Jackson displayed ineffective leadership

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Jackson/Stonewall_Jackson_Biographical_Summary/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson Genealogy. Online Resources from the VMI Archives.
    child to reach adulthood Julia married William Edmund Christian they had two children Chart showing Jackson s children and grandchildren Ancestors Stonewall Jackson was descended from John Jackson born ca 1716 in Ireland moved to London age 10 d 1801 and Elizabeth Cummins b ca 1719 London England d 1825 Both were convicted of theft in 1749 in London s Old Bailey court and were sentenced to seven year indentures to some of his Majesty s colonies and Plantations in America The couple met on board the prison ship Litchfield which departed London in May 1749 and originally settled in Maryland Both were able to complete their indentures early and they married in 1755 Shortly after the birth of their first child they left Maryland to become pioneers in the area that is now northwestern West Virginia For more information see Chapter 1 of the notable biography Stonewall Jackson the Man the Soldier the Legend by James I Robertson Jr Stonewall Jackson ancestors showing descendants of John Jackson Stonewall s great grandfather through 4 generations Siblings Jackson was devoted to his younger sister Laura Ann Jackson Arnold 1826 1911 The other Jackson siblings Elizabeth 1819 1826 and Warren 1821 1841 died young Jackson also had a half brother William Wirt Woodson 1831 1875 through his mother s second marriage in 1830 to Blake Baker Woodson 1783 1833 Thomas and Laura shared the memories of a difficult childhood and corresponded frequently in the years after Thomas left home to attend the United States Military Academy at West Point This close relationship was destroyed during the Civil War While her brother Thomas emerged as a brilliant Confederate military leader Laura remained an outspoken Unionist and she ultimately became estranged from both her brother and other members of the Jackson family During much

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Jackson/Stonewall_Jackson_Genealogy/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson Death & Funeral. Online Resources from the VMI Archives
    Information Archives Archives Home Online Exhibits VMI History FAQs Genealogy Alumni Manuscripts Civil War New Market Give Close Menu Archives Home Digital Collections Archives Online Catalog Quick Info FAQs Civil War New Market Stonewall Jackson Popular Questions Jackson Photos Letters Papers Timeline Biography Jackson Genealogy Death Funeral VMI Career John Brown Execution Books About Jackson Genealogy Alumni Photos Portraits Letters Diaries Manuscripts Digital Exhibits Home Military Oral History VMI Records Records Management About the Archives Mary Laura Kludy Archives Assistant Ph 540 464 7516 Fax 540 464 7089 archives vmi edu Preston Library Lexington Virginia 24450 Hours Visitor Info Archives Jackson Death Funeral Stonewall Jackson Death Funeral Death of Stonewall Jackson May 1863 Resources from the VMI Archives Full Text Primary Sources VMI General Orders Announcement of Jackson s death Soldiers Newspaper Accounts George W Koontz letter May 10 Danville Artillery John Garibaldi letter 27th Virginia Infantry See letter of May 10 1963 Private Henry Dedrick letter May 10 11 1863 52nd Virginia Infantry Derastus E W Myers letter 33rd Virginia Infantry Col Abram Fulkerson letter 1863 May 18 An officer and Jackson s former student reacts to the news of Jackson s death Cadet Charles T Haigh diary Cadet reaction to Jackson s death Cadet Samuel B Hannah letter Jackson s body is returned to Lexington Funeral of Stonewall Jackson Newspaper account Rebecca McDowell letter The mother of a VMI Cadet and a cousin of Mrs Jackson expresses grief Mrs McDowell s son William would be killed at the Battle of New Market in May 1864 John T Norton letter A Union soldier from New York comments on Jackson s death Secondary Sources The Last Illness Death of General Stonewall Jackson In this full text article published 1975 a modern physician analyzes Jackson s symptoms and treatment Krick Robert

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Jackson/Death_Funeral/Stonewall_Jackson_Death___Funeral/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson at VMI. Online Resources from the VMI Archives.
    Civil War New Market Give Close Menu Archives Home Digital Collections Archives Online Catalog Quick Info FAQs Civil War New Market Stonewall Jackson Popular Questions Jackson Photos Letters Papers Timeline Biography Jackson Genealogy Death Funeral VMI Career John Brown Execution Books About Jackson Genealogy Alumni Photos Portraits Letters Diaries Manuscripts Digital Exhibits Home Military Oral History VMI Records Records Management About the Archives Mary Laura Kludy Archives Assistant Ph 540 464 7516 Fax 540 464 7089 archives vmi edu Preston Library Lexington Virginia 24450 Hours Visitor Info Archives Jackson Stonewall Jackson VMI Career Stonewall Jackson at the Virginia Military Institute As Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy Major Jackson was not a success His genius was in the Science and Art of War VMI Superintendent Francis H Smith From 1851 until the outbreak of Civil War Thomas J Jackson served as Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy and Instructor of Artillery Tactics at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington Virginia Natural Philosophy in modern terms roughly equivalent to Physics it included astronomy mechanics acoustics optics and other sciences was a difficult part of the mid nineteenth century curriculum many cadets found it almost impossible to master under the best of circumstances Unfortunately Major Jackson as he was known at VMI was a mediocre teacher although highly intelligent he could not convey the concepts to students This inability along with his humorless demeanor soon branded Jackson as an unpopular faculty member one who was the target of many student pranks Francis H Smith VMI s Superintendent during Jackson s era wrote the following in his History of the Virginia Military Institute As Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy Major Jackson was not a success He had not the qualifications needed for so important a chair He was no teacher and he

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Jackson/Stonewall_Jackson_-_VMI_Career/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson at the Execution of John Brown, 1859. Full text letter from the VMI Archives.
    Visitor Info Archives Civil War Resources John Brown Jackson at John Brown Execution The Execution of John Brown Stonewall Jackson Eyewitness Account About this Document This letter was written by Maj Thomas Jackson then on the faculty at the Virginia Military Institute to his wife Mary Anna The original letter is located in the Dabney Jackson collection at the Library of Virginia It has been widely reprinted there are minor editorial variations among different published versions though no substantive differences For one published source see Life and Letters of Thomas J Jackson by Mary Anna Jackson NY Harper 1892 More about this topic December 2 1859 John Brown was hung today at about 11 1 2 A M He behaved with unflinching firmness The arrangements were well made under the direction of Col Smith Brown s wife visited him last evening The body is to be delivered to her The gibbet was south east of the town in a large field Brown rode on the head of his coffin from his prison to the place of execution The coffin was of black walnut enclosed in a poplar box of the same shape as the coffin He was dressed in carpet slippers of predominating red white socks blacks pants black frock coat black vest black slouch hat Nothing around his neck beside his shirt collar The open wagon in which he rode was strongly guarded on all sides Capt Williams formerly one of the assistants of the Institute marched immediately in front of the wagon The jailer and high sheriff and several others rode in the wagon with the prisoner Brown had his arms tied behind him ascended the scaffold with apparent cheerfulness After reaching the top of the platform he shook hands with several who were standing around him The sheriff placed the rope around his neck then threw a white cap over his head asked him if he wished a signal when all should be ready to which he replied that it made no difference provided he was not kept waiting too long In this condition he stood on the trap door which was supported on one side by hinges and on the other south side by a rope for about 10 minutes when Col S told the Sheriff all is ready which apparently was not comprehended by the Sheriff and the Col had to repeat the order when the rope was cut by a single blow and Brown fell through about 25 inches so as to bring his knees on a level with the position occupied by his feet before the rope was cut With the fall his arms below the elbow flew up hands clenched his arms gradually fell by spasmodic motions there was very little motion of his person for several minutes after which the wind blew his lifeless body to fro His face upon the scaffold was turned a little east of south and in front of him were the cadets commanded by Major Gilham

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Civil_War/John_Brown/Jackson_at_John_Brown_Execution/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson Resources. Books about Jackson.
    local library does not own these books ask your librarian about interlibrary loan The highly recommended biography Robertson James I Stonewall Jackson the man the soldier the legend New York Macmillan Library Reference USA 1997 This book contains an excellent and comprehensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources Selected modern sources Alexander Bevin Lost victories the military genius of Stonewall Jackson New York Holt 1992 Casdorph Paul D Lee and Jackson Confederate chieftains New York Paragon House 1992 Clark Champ Decoying the yanks Jackson s valley campaign Alexandria Va Time Life Books c1984 Farwell Byron Stonewall a biography of General Thomas J Jackson New York W W Norton 1992 Gallagher Gary W editor Chancellorsville the battle and its aftermath Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Press 1996 Krick Robert K Conquering the valley Stonewall Jackson at Port Republic New York Morrow 1996 Krick Robert K Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Press c1990 Krick Robert K The Smoothbore Volley that Doomed the Confederacy An essay published in the book Chancellorsville the Battle and Its Afermath edited by Gary W Gallagher The University of North Carolina Press 1996 Krick includes an excellent bibliography O Reilly Frank A The Fredericksburg Campaign Stonewall Jackson at Fredericksburg the Battle of Prospect Hill December 13 1862 Lynchburg Va H E Howard c1993 Rankin Thomas M Stonewall Jackson s Romney Campaign January 1 February 20 1862 Lynchburg Va H E Howard c1994 Robertson James I The Stonewall Brigade Baton Rouge Louisiana State University Press c1963 1977 printing Rozear Marvin P and Greenfield Joseph C Jr Let Us Cross Over The River The Final Illness Of Stonewall Jackson Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 1995 vol 103 no 1 pp 29 46 Royster Charles The destructive war William Tecumseh Sherman Stonewall Jackson and the Americans New York Knopf Random House distributor 1991 Schildt John W Stonewall Jackson day by day Chewsville Md Antietam Publications 1980 Schildt John W Jackson and the preachers Parsons W Va McClain Printing Co 1982 Sears Stephen W Chancellorsville Boston Houghton Mifflin Co 1996 Shaw Maurice F Maurice Friedlander Stonewall Jackson s surgeon Hunter Holmes McGuire a biography Lynchburg VA H E Howard 1993 Tanner Robert G Stonewall in the valley Thomas J Stonewall Jackson s Shenandoah Valley campaign spring 1862 Mechanicsville PA Stackpole Books c1996 Selected older sources Many of these were written by family members or associates of Jackson and his family and are of interest to those who wish to read contemporary accounts rather than modern scholarship Allan William 1837 1889 History of the campaign of Gen T J Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia From November 4 1861 to June 17 1862 With full maps of the region and of the battle fields by Jed Hotchkiss Philadelphia J B Lippincott Co 1880 Arnold Thomas Jackson Early life and letters of General Thomas J Jackson Stonewall Jackson by his nephew Thomas Jackson Arnold New York Chicago etc Fleming H Revell Company c1916 Cook

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/Archives/Jackson/Stonewall_Jackson_Books/ (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson - Popular Questions. An FAQ from the VMI Archives.
    nickname was first given to Jackson by General Bernard Bee on the battlefield at First Manassas on July 21 1861 It refers to Jackson s steadfastness in the face of the enemy Jackson s demeanor inspired Bee a friend from Jackson s years at West Point to shout to his troops Look men there is Jackson standing like a stone wall Let us determine to die here and we will conquer Jackson s troops also referred to him as Old Jack What was the name of Jackson s horse View Photo 1 Photo 2 In the spring of 1861 while he was in command at Harper s Ferry Jackson acquired the horse that he rode throughout the war Although the horse was originally purchased by Jackson as a gift for his wife and initially named Fancy this name was short lived Jackson decided to keep the horse and it was universally known as Little Sorrel Described as small approximately 15 hands and gaunt but with remarkable powers of endurance Little Sorrel remained Jackson s favorite and he was riding this horse when he was mortally wounded at Chancellorsville After the war Little Sorrel first returned to North Carolina with Mrs Jackson and subsequently was sent to VMI where he grazed on the VMI Parade Ground and was a favorite of cadets He died in March 1886 at the age of 36 and his mounted hide is now on display in the VMI Museum in Lexington Virginia Little Sorrel s bones were cremated and interred on the grounds of VMI in 1997 Is it true that Jackson loved lemons Jackson was very concerned about his health and followed a strict diet which emphasized fruits and vegetables Although he enjoyed almost every variety of fruit he had no special fondness for lemons in fact peaches were his favorite Civil War historian James I Robertson Jr Jackson s biographer states that no member of Jackson s staff no friend not even his wife ever mentioned Jackson had a particular penchant for lemons and refers to the lemon myth It is true that Jackson was observed eating lemons on several occasions during the war this was due only to the fact that he ate whatever fruit was available When the Confederates captured a Union camp lemons were sometimes among the food stores that they confiscated the Union soldiers received lemons and other fruits more frequently than did their Confederate counterparts Despite the historical inaccuracy the story remains popular Tourists who visit Jackson s gravesite at Lexington Virginia often leave lemons as a tribute Did Jackson marry Did he have any children Jackson married twice On August 4 1853 Jackson married Elinor Junkin 1825 1854 daughter of Dr George Junkin President of Washington College and Julia Miller Junkin Elinor Ellie died in childbirth on October 22 1854 Their child a son was stillborn On July 16 1857 Jackson married for the second time Mary Anna Morrison 1831 1915 daughter of Robert Hall Morrison and Mary

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/archives.aspx?id=3761 (2016-02-15)
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  • Stonewall Jackson Papers. Letters of the Civil War General. Full text from the VMI Archives.
    Archives Preston Library Library Home Find Books Departments Media Equipment Technical Services Visitor Information Archives Archives Home Online Exhibits VMI History FAQs Genealogy Alumni Manuscripts Civil War New Market Give Close Menu Archives Home Digital Collections Archives Online Catalog Quick Info FAQs Civil War New Market Stonewall Jackson Popular Questions Jackson Photos Letters Papers Timeline Biography Jackson Genealogy Death Funeral VMI Career John Brown Execution Books About Jackson Genealogy Alumni Photos Portraits Letters Diaries Manuscripts Digital Exhibits Home Military Oral History VMI Records Records Management About the Archives Mary Laura Kludy Archives Assistant Ph 540 464 7516 Fax 540 464 7089 archives vmi edu Preston Library Lexington Virginia 24450 Hours Visitor Info Archives Jackson Papers Stonewall Jackson Papers Mary Anna Jackson Papers VMI Archives Manuscript Accession 00102 Dates 1844 1915 Selected full text letters available online About the Jackson Papers The collection consists primarily of the personal papers of Civil War General Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson b 18 Stonewall Jackson Papers Home Stonewall Jackson Papers About the Jackson Papers Manuscript 0102 The VMI Archives holds a significant collection of the personal papers of Civil War General Thomas Jonathan Stonewall Jackson The papers consist primarily of Jackson s outgoing personal correspondence Included are letters written between 1844 1863 spanning his West Point cadetship U S Army career professorship at the Virginia Military Institute and the Civil War years the bulk of the items date from prior to the outbreak of war Many of the letters were written to his sister Laura Jackson Arnold Topics include professional personal and domestic matters religious faith health and diet and his family The correspondence provides insight into Jackson s personality and philosophy and presents a portrait of the man as he was in the years before he gained national fame as a wartime military leader

    Original URL path: http://www.vmi.edu/archives.aspx?id=4931 (2016-02-15)
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