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  • Design Plans Approved as Progress to Build Intellectual House Continues | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    improved cultural understanding and sense of unity for the entire UW community Also known by the Lushootseed language name Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ pronounced wah sheb altuh the facility will feature a village concept that includes two primary buildings and a central outdoor gathering space on a site between Lewis and McMahon halls Its design created by the Seattle architectural firm of Jones Jones will showcase the Pacific Northwest coastal longhouse style and include elements that speak to Native people from all regions of the country An art plan has been completed by the local firm 4Culture which identifies opportunities for the inclusion of Native art pieces throughout the buildings and grounds New architectural renderings have also been created by artist Stephanie Bower to provide a vision of how the facility will appear after construction The interior of the Community Gathering Building By Stephanie Bower Next steps include completion of construction documents by Jones Jones A construction company will be selected in the fall followed shortly thereafter by a groundbreaking on the first phase of the facility the Community Gathering Building and outdoor gathering space The 8 400 square foot Community Gathering Building will serve as an event site and meeting place to bring people from diverse cultures and backgrounds together The outdoor site will feature a ceremonial space cooking area teaching area Native arts exhibit area and a drop off and welcome area Both are planned to be open for use at the beginning of winter quarter 2015 Phase two of the project will include further fundraising for the Teaching and Learning Building that will feature student programming space meeting rooms an arts lab and Elders lounge The exterior of the Intellectual House including the outdoor gathering space By Stephanie Bower The planning process to build Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ has received input and guidance from UW community members an elders committee and regional tribes Donations and pledges totaling almost 6 million are supporting the design and construction of phase one The Wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ name was gifted to the project by the late Vi Hilbert a Lushootseed linguist and elder in the Upper Skagit Tribe More information is available on the Intellectual House web site Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 9 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2013/04/08/design-plans-approved-as-progress-to-build-intellectual-house-continues/ (2014-06-24)
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  • UW pledges $5 million to help make ‘Intellectual House a reality | UW Today
    McMahon Hall Scheduled to open in 2014 the 19 000 square foot facility will provide a multi service learning and gathering space for Native American students faculty staff and others from various cultures and communities It will feature a large central gathering space meeting and classroom space student lounge computer and resource room kitchen and office space The Intellectual House is expected to help UW improve recruitment retention and graduation rates for Native students while honoring the regions tribes The UWs pledge of 5 million in matching funds demonstrates the Universitys commitment to realizing this 35 year dream of having a longhouse style building a home away from home for Native students built on the Seattle campus said Charlotte Coté UW associate professor of American Indian studies and chair of the Intellectual House Planning and Advisory Committee The name is a Lushootseed language word that means Intellectual House The planning and design of the facility has involved tribes elders students and the community The project is led by the Intellectual House Planning and Advisory Committee comprised of UW faculty staff students and regional tribal representatives Seattle based Jones Jones is the project architect known for designing the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D C as well as campus longhouse facilities at the University of Oregon Evergreen State College and North Idaho College Johnpaul Jones the firms founding partner has a distinguished 40 year career and a design philosophy that stems from his Cherokee Choctaw ancestry The state provided 300 000 in pre design funding for the UW Intellectual House and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation will donate lumber worth an estimated 91 000 More information is available on the Intellectual House website Share this Facebook Twitter Email Print Office of News Information Browse Articles Contact Us Community Photos UW Classifieds University Photography UW Experts Search UW Today Search Browse Categories Select Category Administrative Affairs Archive Arts and Entertainment Buildings and Grounds Education Engineering Environment For UW Employees Health and Medicine Honors and Awards Learning News Releases News Roundups Politics and Government Profiles Research Science Social Science Technology UW and the Community Latest Stories Ferroelectric switching seen in biological tissues 4 hours ago Zippy electric micro cars coming to campus for sustainability research 7 hours ago UW students electric hybrid car takes 2nd in international competition 3 days ago Global issues at play in book of study abroad student letters 5 days ago Related Stories Native American longhouse breaks ground Oct 25 October 21 2013 UW welcomes Denzil Suite vice president for student life July 29 2013 31M gift will fund early stage UW research by high tech entrepreneurs May 14 2014 Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore the UW Admissions Undergraduates Graduates UW Online Paying for college Husky Promise Financial aid estimator Continuing Education Summer

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/news/2011/01/26/uw-pledges-5-million-to-help-make-intellectual-house-a-reality/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: Phavy Chey | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    and families My mother was forced to leave her homeland following the Khmer Rouge a genocide led by communists who killed over two thirds of Cambodia s population She lost her entire family including her husband who was killed when he was forced to enlist in the war and her children who died soon after from starvation and malnutrition She escaped into the jungles and sought refuge in the Thailand refugee camps where she eventually met my father and established our family After many years living in the refuge camps throughout Thailand and the Philippines we finally made our way to America through sponsorship Hopeful for a new beginning we envisioned a life free of struggle but soon discovered the many challenges of being an impoverished refugee family in America Displaced in a foreign land among strangers stressors continued to pile onto my family Shortly after our arrival in Seattle as refugees my father developed a gambling addiction and became an abusive alcoholic towards my mother and siblings During this time my mother was also diagnosed with type II diabetes My mother s condition continues to limit her ability to work and perform simple daily tasks to this day My family s hardships persisted into my high school years as we relied on government assistance such as low income housing social security checks and food stamps to make ends meet Being the first individual in my family to complete a degree from a university I received a Bachelor s of Science in Public Health at the University of Washington I am determined to help disadvantaged families thrive in terms of their health and well being with my compassion and patience View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 11 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program Health Sciences Center Minority Students Program Initiative for Maximizing Student Development Instructional Center Samuel E Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/29/no-longer-invisible-phavy-chey/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: James Hong | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    spring roll and upon digestion our two minds shall become one Food should not relegate culture to an afterthought or keep communities invisible It is impossible to experience something as rich as culture through food alone no matter how delicious it may be We need to appreciate that history and heritage actually give meaning and value to food For example a lot of people commonly mistake a banh mi sandwich as Vietnamese but it was actually introduced by the French during Vietnam s colonial period While different cultures may interact with food differently one common thread I ve observed is that food acts as a catalyst to bring people together it is a shared cultural and social experience Food isn t simply the gateway to culture its the bridge Although food can be a rich experience in itself it also has the potential to create barriers that prevent people from authentically engaging with diverse cultures and communities What s the point of taking time to experience Vietnamese history and culture if you think you can absorb it along with your beef broth and cream puff These situations are far too common and ironically create distance between the people we re trying to connect with The misunderstood relationship between food and culture may also perpetuate stereotypes that are harmful to the identity and dignity of minorities I can t even tell you how many times I ve been called a Twinkie or banana more than 10 less than 200 Though it may seem playful and trivial these stereotypes continue to marginalize many immigrant communities Just because I like General Tso s Chicken does not make me a Twinkie is my usual response Unless by Twinkie you mean I m sweet on the inside with stubbornly enduring shelf life I do keep well for my age View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 11 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/27/no-longer-invisible-james-hong/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: Priscilla Kyu | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    sense of my ethnic and cultural heritage Not quite Chinese Not quite Burmese Not quite American I would listen and understand the adults in my family speak Burmese and while I understand I never learned to speak the language My father thought there was no benefit to teach me Burmese that our success would come from speaking English fluently Little did he expect that today I am taking a Burmese language class here at the UW My parents brought their cultural traditions to the U S with hope to pass onto their children For nearly two decades my mother would deliver her prayers in Burmese for good health and prosperity for my sister and I As the eldest daughter it was my task to recite Burmese chants to each of the gods in the home before we could eat My mother second generation Chinese Burmese was the last of her six siblings to leave Myanmar Burma for a better life in the United States My father who is ethnically Chinese but was born raised educated in Myanmar could not claim citizenship and therefore could not be employed in higher level occupations that provided sustainable wages Recently I was asked What kind of Asian are you I sensed that while they didn t mean to be offensive they certainly came off that way to me I responded The way you asked is very disrespectful to me If you want to know about my heritage you can ask me about my heritage or how I identify I think it would only be fair that you share about your heritage in return View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 11 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program Health Sciences Center Minority Students Program Initiative for Maximizing Student Development Instructional Center Samuel E Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation McNair Program Academic Counseling Services High School Tutor Mentor Program

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/21/no-longer-invisible-priscilla-kyu/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: Va’eomatoka Kenneth Liueli Valu | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    have learned from my mother my grandmother and all of the others who helped me retain this knowledge with my future children and Tongan youth I am a first generation Tongan immigrant My mother and I came to the United States when I was 14 years old leaving behind life on the islands of the Kingdom of Tonga with a total population of about 110 000 people It was during this time I had my first exposure to the strong possibility of a life without higher education It was only with the help of amazing mentors and constant motivation from my strongest source of support my mother that I was able to broaden what I perceived to be my options The existence of a singular and narrowly defined narrative about AAPI communities is the reason being visible is so important The model minority myth while widely viewed to benefit the perception of a people often masks the larger disparities that exist within the AAPI label particularly when discerning the needs of Native Hawai ians Pacific Islanders and Southeast Asian communities The best way to start is with the disaggregation of AAPI data to highlight the unique needs of these smaller communities I would like to see more AAPI communities histories and cultures particularly the less visible represented in K 12 and the college curriculum Additionally more legislation for equitable health education and civil justice bills that support local and statewide grassroots efforts to advance our AA NHPI communities Located in Oceania Tonga is an archipelago in the South Pacific Ocean directly south of Western Samoa and about two thirds of the way from Hawaii to New Zealand Its 176 islands 36 of them inhabited are divided into three main groups Vava u Ha apai and Tongatapu Wikipedia View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 12 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program Health Sciences Center Minority Students Program Initiative

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/20/no-longer-invisible-vaeomatoka-kenneth-liueli-valu/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: Tsengyang Vang | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    Tacoma Minor Education Identity Hmong American It is important for the AAPI community to be visible because we all have unique stories experiences and struggles that are part of the American experience Sharing these stories can deepen our analysis and understanding of our individual intersectionality and help build connections with each other Hmong are an ethnic minority from Southwest China and the northern regions of Burma Thailand Laos and Vietnam Many of the Hmong people in the United States are from the highlands of Laos In the 1960 s the United States government supported a clandestine air and ground campaign against the North Vietnamese Army and VietCong in the country of Laos bordering Vietnam The CIA and military were able to maintain this secret war due in large part to the help of the Hmong When the U S lost the Vietnam War in 1973 many Hmong people both soldiers and non soldiers left Laos to escape persecution from the Pathet Lao government due to their collaboration with the CIA Those who survived made way to the Thai refugee camps and for some the United States What Are You Really My response I m a Human Being I understand the implication of the question but I don t appreciate that it is being asked with what It implies I am an object or an it rather than a whole person with a unique culture and history View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 12 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program Health Sciences Center Minority Students Program Initiative for Maximizing Student Development Instructional Center Samuel E Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation McNair Program Academic Counseling Services High School Tutor Mentor Program OMA D UWAA Mentor Program OMA D Study Abroad Student Advisory Board TRiO Student Support Services Campus Diversity Diversity Portal Center for Curriculum Transformation Diversity Council Diversity Research Institute Faculty Diversity Faculty Staff

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/16/no-longer-invisible-tsengyang-vang/ (2014-06-24)
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  • No Longer Invisible: Muhamed Manhsour | Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity
    many generations to come our existence and presence matters My name is Muhamed Manhsour People look at me and see an Asian face They wonder why I have an Arabic name This is because of my wonderful heritage and I aim to preserve my culture so that succeeding generations will be enriched Growing up in America I am lucky to have learned about our complex and turbulent history from my grandparents I am lucky because not all of the Cham kids received the opportunity to know their grandparents There is fear among the community in sharing these stories from the past My goal is to educate people about Cham I am planning on creating a cultural center that works to preserve Cham history and our language in order to empower Cham youth to follow their dreams Our language is dying due to our people being reserved about revealing their identity In our motherland Chams are afraid to identify themselves due to our history My parents made sacrifices and escaped to America to make a better future for us One of their visions is for us to learn our history and continue to speak our native languages My parents are refugees My mom is from Cambodia and my dad is from Vietnam they are Cham Cham originated from Champa which was an independent kingdom since 200 AD Cham are the indigenous natives of Vietnam and Cambodia and the major religions are Hinduism Buddhism and Islam In our case we are Muslim Cham View mores stories from the No Longer Invisible In Their Own Words project Share this Facebook Twitter Reddit Email Print Comments are closed News Events Article Archives E newsletters Event Photo Galleries Video Gallery Viewpoint Magazine Recent Articles Class of 2014 Boasts Stellar Group of OMA D Ambassadors 12 mins ago Statewide Summit to Help Undocumented Students Takes Place Friday at UW 5 days ago No Longer Invisible Project Celebrates Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage 2 weeks ago Hurtado Student Scholars Honored at 44th Annual Celebration 3 weeks ago UW Community Attends 10th Annual Kelly Lecture 3 weeks ago Send to Email Address Your Name Your Email Address Cancel Post was not sent check your email addresses Email check failed please try again Sorry your blog cannot share posts by email Explore OMA D Office of Minority Affairs Diversity About About Contact Leadership 2013 14 Fact Sheet Assessment Statistics and Policies Pre College Students Educational Talent Search GEAR UP Educator Development Initiative Ida B Wells High School Math Science Upward Bound Recruitment Outreach RISE UP GEAR UP Upward Bound Washington MESA Washington State Early Outreach Partnership Current Students College Assistance Migrant Program Early Identification Program Health Sciences Center Minority Students Program Initiative for Maximizing Student Development Instructional Center Samuel E Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation McNair Program Academic Counseling Services High School Tutor Mentor Program OMA D UWAA Mentor Program OMA D Study Abroad Student Advisory Board TRiO Student Support Services Campus Diversity

    Original URL path: http://www.washington.edu/omad/2014/05/15/no-longer-invisible-muhamed-manhsour/ (2014-06-24)
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