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  • Support Us | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    Studies Center CLASS European Union Center EUC Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies CLS Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity Race and Sexuality WISER Research Publications Dissertations Undergraduate Fields of Interest News Events Recent News Advising Blog Honors Awards Newsletter Upcoming Events Calendar Resources Advising Administrative Forms Careers Graduate School Grad Students TAs Internships Related Programs Centers Scholarships Awards Technology Visiting Scholars Students Writing Center About Department Profile Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us You are here Home About Support Us Share Print PDF This giving form requires frames Please enable frames or update your browser About Department Profile Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in Advanced Political Studies and Research Courses International Security and Political Economy Option Courses VLPA Courses NW Courses Tips for Getting into Closed Restricted Courses Study Abroad Summer Study Affiliated Centers Center for American Politics and Public Policy CAPPP Center for Communication and Civic Engagement CCCE Center for Environmental Politics CEP Center for Human Rights CHR Center for Social Science Computation Research CSSCR Center for Statistics the Social Sciences CSSS Comparative Law and Society Studies Center CLASS European Union Center EUC Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies CLS Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity Race and Sexuality WISER Research Publications Dissertations Undergraduate Fields of Interest News Events Recent News Advising

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/support-us (2015-10-15)
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  • Contact | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    polisci uw edu Faculty Leadership Name Location Telephone Email Department Chair George Lovell 106 Gowen Hall 206 543 2780 glovell uw edu Dept Associate Chair Christine DiStefano 133 Gowen Hall 206 543 9254 distefan uw edu For all faculty see the Faculty Directory Department Offices and Phone Numbers Office Location Telephone Political Science Main Office Gowen 101 206 543 2780 Department Administrator Ann Buscherfeld Gowen 107 206 543 2783 Academic Services Meera Roy Director Smith 215 206 543 9456 Undergraduate Advising Tamara Sollinger staff adviser Smith 215 206 543 1824 Undergraduate Advising Mark Weitzenkamp staff adviser Smith 215 206 543 1824 Graduate Advising Susanne Recordon Smith 215 206 543 1898 Writing Center Jennifer Driscoll Director Gowen 111 206 616 3354 Computer Classroom Stephen Dunne Smith 220C Smith 220 206 616 3896 Labor Center Smith 101 206 543 7946 Center for American Politics and Public Policy CAPPP Smith 221 206 616 3898 For all staff see the Staff Directory You may also contact us by filling out the form below Share Print PDF Your name Your email address Subject Category General Inquiry Undergraduate Advising Programs Graduate Programs Graduate Admissions Website Feedback or Problems Message Leave this field blank CAPTCHA This question helps to prevent automated spam submissions Math question 6 14 Solve this simple math problem and enter the result E g for 1 3 enter 4 About Department Profile Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/contact (2015-10-15)
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  • Secular Faith: How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    A decade ago it would have been unthinkable for a pope to express tolerance for homosexuality Yet shifts of this kind are actually common in the history of Christian groups Within the United States Christian leaders have regularly revised their teachings to match the beliefs and opinions gaining support among their members and larger society Mark A Smith provocatively argues that religion is not nearly the unchanging conservative influence in American politics that we have come to think it is In fact in the long run religion is best understood as responding to changing political and cultural values rather than shaping them Smith makes his case by charting five contentious issues in America s history slavery divorce homosexuality abortion and women s rights For each he shows how the political views of even the most conservative Christians evolved in the same direction as the rest of society perhaps not as swiftly but always on the same arc During periods of cultural transition Christian leaders do resist prevailing values and behaviors but those same leaders inevitably acquiesce often by reinterpreting the Bible if their positions become no longer tenable Secular ideas and influences thereby shape the ways Christians read and interpret their scriptures People Involved Mark A Smith Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields American Politics Religion Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links Secular Faith How Culture Has Trumped Religion in American Politics Related Fields American Politics Religion Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/secular-faith-how-culture-has-trumped-religion-american-politics (2015-10-15)
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  • Professors Parker & Francis Discuss Race Relations on TheConversation.com | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    is dangerous for race relations Political Science Professors Christopher S Parker and Megan Ming Francis explain why racism continues to haunt us today Drawing a direct comparison between American race relations in the 1960s and today Parker and Francis argue that moderate conservatives need to take a bold stand to combat today s racial injustices Otherwise they embolden vocal white reactionaries The piece was published on TheConversation com on August 10 2015 The Conversation is a collaborative effort among academics in a wide spectrum of fields to provide informed news analysis and commentary that is free to read and republish The Conversation launched in Australia in March 2011 in the UK in May 2013 and in the United States in October 2014 as an independent news source that allows the research community and the public to engage with one another directly The aim of the project is to rebuild trust in journalism to increase the quality of public discourse and to promote better understanding of current affairs and complex issues Join the conversation about Parker and Francis article People Involved Christopher Parker Megan Ming Francis News Category Faculty and Staff Share Print PDF News Topics Advising Alumni Announcements Community Impact Courses Faculty and Staff Giving Jobs Lectures and Events Media Coverage and Op Eds Student Success Study Abroad Volunteering Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/news/2015/08/11/professors-parker-francis-discuss-race-relations-theconversationcom (2015-10-15)
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  • Prof. Christopher Parker in The Conversation, "How the GOP circus act compromises American Democracy" | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    known as the Tea Party Caucus as the source of a palace coup resulting in the retirement of John Boehner and the refusal of his hand picked successor Kevin McCarthy to take possession of the gavel as speaker of the House The simple fact is that Boehner and McCarthy knew this reactionary faction of the GOP was gunning for them Boehner simply quit before he could be fired McCarthy quit while he was ahead The two leaders were targeted because they were willing to cut deals with Democrats This is a problem for all of us because compromise is key if democracy is to function as it should As political theorists Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson suggest compromise is necessary to govern to help citizens realize the benefits they seek and protect their rights In short compromise is essential to the health of democracy Yet since the GOP regained the House and the Tea Party faction took over the party four years ago House Republicans have refused to compromise at every turn Read more People Involved Christopher Parker News Category Faculty and Staff Media Coverage and Op Eds Share Print PDF News Topics Advising Alumni Announcements Community Impact Courses Faculty and Staff Giving Jobs Lectures and Events Media Coverage and Op Eds Student Success Study Abroad Volunteering Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/news/2015/10/14/prof-christopher-parker-conversation-how-gop-circus-act-compromises-american (2015-10-15)
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  • Prof. John Wilkerson published article in the American Journal of Political Science, "Tracing the Flow of Policy Ideas in Legislatures: A Text Reuse Approach" | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    G Quinn on October 8 2015 1 46pm Tracing the Flow of Policy Ideas in Legislatures A Text Reuse Approach John Wilkerson University of Washington David Smith Northeastern University and Nicholas Stramp University of Washington This article proposes a new approach to investigating the substance of lawmaking Only a very small proportion of bills become law in the U S Congress However the bills that do become law often serve as vehicles for language originating in other bills We investigate text reuse methods as a means for tracing the progress of policy ideas in legislation We then show how a focus on policy ideas leads to new insights into the lawmaking process Although our focus is on relating content found within bills the same methods can be used to study policy substance across many research domains Wilkerson J Smith D and Stramp N 2015 Tracing the Flow of Policy Ideas in Legislatures A Text Reuse Approach American Journal of Political Science 59 943 956 doi 10 1111 ajps 12175 People Involved John D Wilkerson News Category Faculty and Staff Media Coverage and Op Eds Share Print PDF News Topics Advising Alumni Announcements Community Impact Courses Faculty and Staff Giving Jobs Lectures and Events Media Coverage and Op Eds Student Success Study Abroad Volunteering Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/news/2015/10/08/prof-john-wilkerson-published-article-american-journal-political-science-tracing (2015-10-15)
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  • Crystal Pryor recipient of 2015-2016  Fellowship | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    a resident fellow at Pacific Forum CSIS in Honolulu and spend up to six weeks in Washington DC for fieldwork Crystal is a Political Science Ph D Candidate at the University of Washington where she focuses on International Relations and Security Studies Her dissertation is on strategic trade controls for which she has conducted fieldwork in Japan the United States and Europe Her chapter From Global Straggler to Regional Exemplar Japan s Export Control System 1990 present was published in Modelling Dual Use Trade Control Systems 2014 She has also published policy briefs with Asia House and the Asia Pacific Bulletin In addition to a research grant from the University of Washington European Center of Excellence 2014 she has been a fellow with the East West Center in Washington 2012 the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science 2014 and the Japan Foundation 2015 Crystal holds a BA in International Relations from Brown University 2004 a Master s degree in Political Science from the University of Tokyo 2009 and a Master s Degree from the University of Washington 2012 Crystal has public sector experience working at the U S Embassy in Tokyo 2008 2010 People Involved Crystal Pryor News Category Student Success Share Print PDF News Topics Advising Alumni Announcements Community Impact Courses Faculty and Staff Giving Jobs Lectures and Events Media Coverage and Op Eds Student Success Study Abroad Volunteering Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/news/2015/10/06/crystal-pryor-recipient-2015-2016-fellowship (2015-10-15)
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  • Jack Turner published article in Politics, Groups, and Identities, Vol 3, Issue 3, 2015 | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    expose liberalism s complicity with white supremacy and to transform liberalism into a source of antiracist political critique This article analyzes both Mills critique of liberalism and his attempt to reconstruct it into a political philosophy capable of adequately addressing racial injustice I focus on his a problematization of moral personhood b theorization of white ignorance and c conceptualization of white supremacy Together these establish the need to integrate a new empirical axiom into liberal political theory the axiom of the power of white supremacy in modernity or the axiom of white power for short This axiom is analogous to James Madison s axiom of the encroaching spirit of power Any liberal theorist who fails to take the encroaching spirit of power seriously meets the scorn of his peers The same should be true for white power Mills suggests I conclude that Mills reconstruction of liberalism is incomplete and urge him to develop a fully fledged liberal theory of racial justice to complete it Jack Turner 2015 Reconstructing liberalism Charles Mills unfinished project Politics Groups and Identities 3 3 471 487 DOI 10 1080 21565503 2015 1050418 People Involved Jack Turner III News Category Faculty and Staff Media Coverage and Op Eds Share Print PDF News Topics Advising Alumni Announcements Community Impact Courses Faculty and Staff Giving Jobs Lectures and Events Media Coverage and Op Eds Student Success Study Abroad Volunteering Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/news/2015/10/06/jack-turner-published-article-politics-groups-and-identities-vol-3-issue-3-2015 (2015-10-15)
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