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  • Norms, Perverse Effects, and Torture | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    Race and Sexuality WISER Research Publications Dissertations Undergraduate Fields of Interest News Events Recent News Advising Blog Honors Awards Newsletter Upcoming Events Calendar Resources Advising Administrative Forms Careers Graduate School Grad Students TAs Internships Related Programs Centers Scholarships Awards Technology Visiting Scholars Students Writing Center About Department Profile Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us You are here Home Research Publications Norms Perverse Effects and Torture Norms Perverse Effects and Torture International Theory 7 no 1 2015 33 60 Adviser Elizabeth Kier People Involved William d Ambruoso Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Articles Related Fields Human Rights International Relations International Security Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links Link to IT article Related Fields Human Rights International Relations International Security Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in Advanced Political Studies and Research Courses International Security and Political Economy Option Courses VLPA Courses NW Courses Tips for Getting into Closed Restricted Courses Study Abroad Summer Study Affiliated Centers Center for American Politics and Public Policy CAPPP Center for Communication and Civic Engagement CCCE Center for Environmental Politics CEP Center for Human Rights CHR Center for Social Science Computation Research CSSCR Center for Statistics the Social Sciences CSSS Comparative Law and Society Studies Center CLASS European Union Center EUC Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies CLS Washington Institute

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/norms-perverse-effects-and-torture (2015-10-16)
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  • Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    State Cambridge University Press 2014 Did the civil rights movement impact the development of the American state Despite extensive accounts of civil rights mobilization and narratives of state building there has been surprisingly little research that explicitly examines the importance and consequence that civil rights activism has had for the process of state building in American political and constitutional development Through a sweeping archival analysis of the NAACP s battle against lynching and mob violence from 1909 to 1923 this book examines how the NAACP raised public awareness won over American presidents and secured the support of Congress In the NAACP s most far reaching victory the Supreme Court ruled that the constitutional rights of black defendants were violated by a white mob in the landmark criminal procedure decision Moore v Dempsey This book demonstrates the importance of citizen agency in the making of new constitutional law in a period unexplored by previous scholarship Moore v Dempsey made clear that states could not always be trusted to properly deal with matters of criminal procedure and that when state courts acted as a menace to equal rights federal courts could intervene In the decades that followed the Supreme Court used the precedent established in Moore to expand its reach through a string of landmark decisions that scholars would consequently call the criminal procedure revolution When asked about why she wrote this book Francis answered With this book I hope to bring the political work and the voices of African Americans out of the shadows and into the forefront of how we think about political and constitutional development in the early 20th century The NAACP s campaign to end racial violence provides compelling evidence that political institutions can sometimes reflect the expressions of society s preferences Put simply institutional development derives from the tension between powerful actors and those who contest and critique the projects they seek to implement The effort that culminated in Moore v Dempsey in particular exemplifies how the NAACP created opportunities for black civil society to challenge Jim Crow via criminal court trials and how the organization ultimately pushed the federal government in a new direction People Involved Megan Ming Francis Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields African American American Political Development American Politics Civil Rights Law and Society Legal Mobilization Minority and Race Politics Public Law Race and Ethnicity Social Movements Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State American Politcal Science Association Ralph Bunche Award Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State American Politcal Science Association Ralph Bunche Award Related Fields African American American Political Development American Politics Civil Rights Law and Society Legal Mobilization Minority and Race Politics Public Law Race and Ethnicity Social Movements Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/civil-rights-and-making-modern-american-state (2015-10-16)
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  • Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in Contemporary America | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    Believe In offers an alternative argument that the Tea Party is driven by the reemergence of a reactionary movement in American politics that is fueled by a fear that America has changed for the worse Providing a range of original evidence and rich portraits of party sympathizers as well as activists Christopher Parker and Matt Barreto show that what actually pushes Tea Party supporters is not simple ideology or racism but fear that the country is being stolen from real Americans a belief triggered by Obama s election From civil liberties and policy issues to participation in the political process the perception that America is in danger directly informs how Tea Party supporters think and act The authors argue that this isn t the first time a segment of American society has perceived the American way of life as under siege In fact movements of this kind often appear when some individuals believe that American values are under threat by rapid social changes Drawing connections between the Tea Party and right wing reactionary movements of the past including the Know Nothing Party the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the John Birch Society Parker and Barreto develop a framework that transcends the Tea Party to shed light on its current and future consequences Linking past and present reactionary movements Change They Can t Believe In rigorously examines the motivations and political implications associated with today s Tea Party People Involved Christopher Parker Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields American Politics Minority and Race Politics Race and Ethnicity Share Print PDF Related Fields American Politics Minority and Race Politics Race and Ethnicity Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/change-they-cant-believe-tea-party-and-reactionary-politics-contemporary-america (2015-10-16)
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  • Bankers, Bureaucrats, and Central Bank Politics | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    University Press 2013 Winner of the Charles Levine Memorial Prize for Best Book in Comparative Public Policy and Administration Most studies of the political economy of money focus on the laws protecting central banks from government interference this book turns to the overlooked people who actually make monetary policy decisions Using formal theory and statistical evidence from dozens of central banks across the developed and developing worlds this book shows that monetary policy agents are not all the same Molded by specific professional and sectoral backgrounds and driven by career concerns central bankers with different career trajectories choose predictably different monetary policies These differences undermine the widespread belief that central bank independence is a neutral solution for macroeconomic management Instead through careful appointment and retention of central bankers partisan governments can and do influence monetary policy preserving a political trade off between inflation and real economic performance even in an age of legally independent central banks People Involved Christopher Adolph Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields Comparative Politics Political Economy Political Methodology Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links Additional resources on Christopher Adolph s academic homepage Related Fields Comparative Politics Political Economy Political Methodology Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in Advanced Political Studies and Research Courses International Security and Political Economy

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/bankers-bureaucrats-and-central-bank-politics (2015-10-16)
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  • Hind Ahmed Zaki and Ellis Goldberg. “After the Revolution: Reflections on the Rule of Law in Egypt” | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    Honors Awards Newsletter Upcoming Events Calendar Resources Advising Administrative Forms Careers Graduate School Grad Students TAs Internships Related Programs Centers Scholarships Awards Technology Visiting Scholars Students Writing Center About Department Profile Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us You are here Home Research Publications Hind Ahmed Zaki and Ellis Goldberg After the Revolution Reflections on the Rule of Law in Egypt Hind Ahmed Zaki and Ellis Goldberg 2012 After the Revolution Reflections on the Rule of Law in Egypt In Eugene Cotran Ed Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Volume 16 The Hague Brill Publishers People Involved Hind Ahmed Zaki Ellis Goldberg Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Articles Related Fields Law and Society Middle Eastern Politics Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links Brill Online Books and Journals Related Fields Law and Society Middle Eastern Politics Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in Advanced Political Studies and Research Courses International Security and Political Economy Option Courses VLPA Courses NW Courses Tips for Getting into Closed Restricted Courses Study Abroad Summer Study Affiliated Centers Center for American Politics and Public Policy CAPPP Center for Communication and Civic Engagement CCCE Center for Environmental Politics CEP Center for Human Rights CHR Center for Social Science Computation Research CSSCR Center for Statistics the Social Sciences CSSS Comparative Law and

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/hind-ahmed-zaki-and-ellis-goldberg-after-revolution-reflections-rule-law-egypt (2015-10-16)
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  • Hind Ahmed Zaki. "Law as a tool for empowering women within marital relations: A Case Study of Paternity Lawsuits in Egypt" | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    Cairo Cairo Papers in Social Science Series 31 2 The American University in Cairo Press How do women use courts within the context of paternity lawsuits This study analyzes the challenges that the formal legal approach to empowering women faces once it is translated into everyday socio legal experiences and court repertoires It also seeks to trace the pathologies inherent in personal status law reform and normal legal practices in Egypt attesting to the limitations of law as an agent of social change in the private domain of the family It mainly sheds light on the difficulties of separating formal legal rules from informal social practices It also explores the problem of paternity claims in Egypt Adding to growing literature on the use of legal mobilization to advance gender equity this study offers insights on the often neglected role of social norms in court experiences often leading to unexpected consequences that sometimes defy the intended goals behind policies and legislation People Involved Hind Ahmed Zaki Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields Law and Society Legal Mobilization Near Eastern Studies Women Studies Share Print PDF Resources and Related Links How do women use courts within the context of paternity lawsuits This study analyzes the challenges that the formal legal appro Related Fields Law and Society Legal Mobilization Near Eastern Studies Women Studies Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/hind-ahmed-zaki-law-tool-empowering-women-within-marital-relations-case-study-paternity (2015-10-16)
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  • Awakening to Race: Individualism and Social Consciousness in America | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    real obstacle to success and that remaining racial inequality stems largely from the failure of minority groups to take personal responsibility for seeking out opportunities Often this argument is made in the name of the long tradition of self reliance and American individualism In Awakening to Race Jack Turner upends this view arguing that it expresses not a deep commitment to the values of individualism but a narrow understanding of them Drawing on the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson Henry David Thoreau Frederick Douglass Ralph Ellison and James Baldwin Turner offers an original reconstruction of democratic individualism in American thought All these thinkers he shows held that personal responsibility entails a refusal to be complicit in injustice and a duty to combat the conditions and structures that support it At a time when individualism is invoked as a reason for inaction Turner makes the individualist tradition the basis of a bold and impassioned case for race consciousness consciousness of the ways that race continues to constrain opportunity in America Turner s new individualism becomes the grounds for concerted public action against racial injustice People Involved Jack Turner III Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields American Politics Minority and Race Politics Political Theory Race and Ethnicity Share Print PDF Related Fields American Politics Minority and Race Politics Political Theory Race and Ethnicity Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/awakening-race-individualism-and-social-consciousness-america (2015-10-16)
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  • Congress and the Politics of Problem Solving | Department of Political Science | University of Washington
    2012 Congress and the Politics of Problem Solving shows how a simple premise voters are willing to hold lawmakers accountable for their collective problem solving abilities can produce novel insights into legislative organization behavior and output How do issues end up on the agenda Why do lawmakers routinely invest in program oversight and broad policy development What considerations drive legislative policy change Knowing that their prospects for reelection are partly dependent on their collective problem solving abilities lawmakers support structures that enhance the legislature s capacity to address problems in society and encourage members to contribute to nonparticularistic policy making activities The resulting insights are novel and substantial Congress collective performance affects the reelection prospects of incumbents of both parties the legislative issue agenda can often be predicted years in advance nearly all important successful legislation originates in committee most laws pass with bipartisan support and electorally induced shifts in preferences or partisan control are not robust predictors of policy change The electoral imperative to address problems in society provides a compelling explanation for these important and provocative findings People Involved John D Wilkerson Status of Research or Work Completed published Research Type Publications Books Related Fields American Politics Share Print PDF Related Fields American Politics Support Political Science Stay Connected Newsletter Sign up News Feed Alumni Update Advising Blog Main Menu People Faculty Adjuncts Staff Graduate Students Alumni Distinguished Alumni Alumni Notes Where are you Hire a UW Ph D Programs Courses Undergraduate What is Political Science Advising Major Minor Honors Internships Research Independent Study Scholarships Awards Transfer Students Writing Center Organizations for Students Careers Graduate School Graduate Program Overview Admissions Courses Funding Requirements Office Policies Student Guide Placement Record Resources Visiting Students Courses Course Catalog Time Schedule Projected Courses Certificate in Advanced Political Studies and Research Courses International

    Original URL path: http://www.polisci.washington.edu/publications/congress-and-politics-problem-solving (2015-10-16)
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