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  • Joseph Weis | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    Home People Faculty Joseph Weis Joseph Weis Professor Emeritus 206 685 2043 weis uw edu CV 942 36 KB Savery 244 Office Hours variable Fields of Interest Criminology Deviance and Social Control Murder Sociology of Sport Background and Experience Summary Ph D University of California Berkeley 1974 Research Research Advised Graduate Dissertations Young Jacob T N 2011 Projections or Connections A Comparison of Perceptual and Actual Measures of Peer Delinquency in Adolescent Friendship Networks PhD Dissertation Department of Sociology University of Washington Courses Taught Spring 2015 SOC 275 Murder A Summer 2014 A term SOC 275 Murder A Summer 2014 B term SOC 222 Sociology Of Sport A Share Print PDF Related Fields Criminology Deviance and Social Control Murder Sociology of Sport Support Us Give to Sociology Stay Connected Facebook News Feed Mailing List Alumni Update Main Menu People Faculty Core Faculty Emeritus Faculty Adjuncts Affiliates Postdocs Visitors Staff Graduate Students Job Market Candidates Alumni Alumni News Alumni Update Programs Courses Undergraduate Meet With an Advisor Applying to Sociology Current Majors Practicum Special Programs Undergraduate Blog Sociology Writing Center Graduate Program Overview Admissions Faculty Advising Recent Ph D Dissertations Nitty Gritty Manual Resources for Graduate Students The Graduate School at

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/people/joseph-weis (2016-04-27)
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  • Jonathan Wender | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    From the Chair Locating the Department Stay Connected Support Us Contact Us You are here Home People Faculty Jonathan Wender Jonathan Wender Lecturer Joint Appointment with Law Societies and Justice 206 543 9644 jmwender uw edu CV 56 64 KB Cunningham 205 Office Hours Friday 2 30 4 30 PM or by appointment Background and Experience Summary Ph D Simon Fraser University 2004 Research Publications Book Chapters The Phenomenology of Arrest A Case Study in the Poetics of Police Citizen Encounters In Poetics of Crime Excursions into Creative Criminology edited by Michael Jacobsen London Ashgate 2014 Courses Taught Spring 2016 SOC 372 Introduction To Criminal Justice A Winter 2016 SOC 110 Survey Of Sociology A Autumn 2015 SOC 374 Law And Society A SOC 374 Law And Society AA SOC 374 Law And Society AB SOC 374 Law And Society AC SOC 376 Drugs And Society A Summer 2015 B term SOC 376 Drugs And Society A Spring 2015 SOC 372 Introduction To Criminal Justice A Winter 2015 SOC 110 Survey Of Sociology A Autumn 2014 SOC 374 Law And Society A SOC 376 Drugs And Society A SOC 376 Drugs And Society B Summer 2014 A term SOC 376 Drugs And Society A Share Print PDF Support Us Give to Sociology Stay Connected Facebook News Feed Mailing List Alumni Update Main Menu People Faculty Core Faculty Emeritus Faculty Adjuncts Affiliates Postdocs Visitors Staff Graduate Students Job Market Candidates Alumni Alumni News Alumni Update Programs Courses Undergraduate Meet With an Advisor Applying to Sociology Current Majors Practicum Special Programs Undergraduate Blog Sociology Writing Center Graduate Program Overview Admissions Faculty Advising Recent Ph D Dissertations Nitty Gritty Manual Resources for Graduate Students The Graduate School at UW Featured Courses Course Offerings Graduation Graduation FAQ Student Resources Diversity Research Research Seminars CSDE

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/people/jonathan-wender (2016-04-27)
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  • Nathalie Williams | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    why some people migrate and many do not In addition to migration she has also published work examining marriage and fertility patterns during conflict Incorporating all these demographic patterns during periods of disasters Williams is now using agent based models to investigate the macro level population trends that can result from these micro level behavioral changes during the recent armed conflict in Nepal and during climatic disasters in Northeast Thailand Other recent work addresses values and beliefs how they influence the likelihood of migration and destination choice to different world regions and how they change through the process of migration Because migration and conflict are inherently difficult subjects about which to collect data and are difficult to measure Williams is involved in developing new data collection strategies and conceptualization methods For example she is working with a team that has successfully collected panel data from a representative sample of Nepali migrants who are currently living in more than 100 countries worldwide Another new project seeks to use data from mobile phone call records to track migration and local mobility after violent events and natural disasters Williams work is primarily based in Nepal Thailand Cambodia and the Persian Gulf Outside of work Williams enjoys hiking and international travel Research Publications Essays and Articles Dobra Adrian Nathalie E Williams and Nathan Eagle 2015 Spatiotemporal Detection of Unusual Human Population Behavior Using Mobile Phone Data PLoS ONE 10 3 e0120449 doi 10 1371 journal Malanson George P Ashton M Verdery Stephen J Walsh Yothin Sawangdee Aree Jampaklay Benjamin W Heumann Philip M McDaniel Brian G Frizzelle Nathalie E Williams Xiaozheng Yao Barbara Entwisle Ronald R Rindfuss 2014 Changing Crops in Response to Climate Virtual Nang Rong Thailand in an Agent Based Simulation Applied Geography 53 202 212 Williams Nathalie E Arland Thornton and

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/people/nathalie-williams (2016-04-27)
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  • Bernd Wurpts | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    229 Fields of Interest Economic Sociology Historical Sociology Social Networks Sociological Theory Background and Experience Summary Courses Taught Summer 2016 Full term SOC 221 Statistical Concepts And Methods For The Social Sciences A Spring 2016 SOC 316 Introduction To Sociological Theory AB SOC 316 Introduction To Sociological Theory AE Winter 2016 SOC 300 Foundations Of Social Inquiry AB SOC 300 Foundations Of Social Inquiry AD Summer 2015 Full term SOC 201 Introductory Topics In Sociology C Spring 2015 SOC 331 Population And Society AA SOC 331 Population And Society AD Winter 2015 SOC 357 Sociology Of Religion AA SOC 357 Sociology Of Religion AB SOC 357 Sociology Of Religion AC Autumn 2014 SOC 316 Introduction To Sociological Theory AC SOC 316 Introduction To Sociological Theory AD Share Print PDF Related Fields Economic Sociology Historical Sociology Social Networks Sociological Theory Support Us Give to Sociology Stay Connected Facebook News Feed Mailing List Alumni Update Main Menu People Faculty Core Faculty Emeritus Faculty Adjuncts Affiliates Postdocs Visitors Staff Graduate Students Job Market Candidates Alumni Alumni News Alumni Update Programs Courses Undergraduate Meet With an Advisor Applying to Sociology Current Majors Practicum Special Programs Undergraduate Blog Sociology Writing Center Graduate Program Overview Admissions

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/people/bernd-wurpts (2016-04-27)
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  • Emilio Zagheni | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    Data International Journal of Manpower 36 1 13 25 Kluesener S and Zagheni E 2014 The East West Gradient in Spatial Population Development within Germany Historical Methods 47 4 167 179 Kluge F Zagheni E Loichinger E and Vogt T 2014 The Advantages of Demographic Change after the Wave Fewer and Older but Healthier Greener and more Productive Plos One 9 9 e1085501 Schmertmann C Zagheni E Goldstein J and Myrskyla M 2014 Bayesian Forecasting of Cohort Fertility Journal of the American Statistical Association 109 506 500 513 De Cao E Zagheni E Manfredi P and Melegaro A 2014 The Relative Importance of Frequency of Contacts and Time of Exposure for the Spread of Directly Transmitted Infections Biostatistics 15 3 470 483 Zagheni E Garimella V R K Weber I and State B 2014 Inferring International and Internal Migration Patterns from Twitter Data WWW Companion 2014 439 444 State B Rodriguez M Helbing D and Zagheni E 2014 Migration of Professionals to the US Evidence from LinkedIn Data Proceedings of SocInfo 2014 Springer s Lecture Note Series in Computer Science 531 543 Dukhovnov D and Zagheni E forthcoming Who Takes Care of Whom in the US Evidence from Matrices of Time Transfers by Age and Sex Population and Development Review Forthcoming Zagheni E and Wagner B forthcoming The Impact of Demographic Change on Intergenerational Transfers via Bequests Demographic Research Forthcoming Publications Books Zagheni E Zannella M Movsesyan M and Wagner B 2014 A Comparative Analysis of European Time Transfers between Generations and Genders Springer Courses Taught Autumn 2016 SOC 401 Special Topics In Sociology C SOC 590 Special Topics In Sociology B Spring 2016 SOC 331 Population And Society A Autumn 2015 SOC 590 Special Topics In Sociology B Spring 2015 SOC 331 Population And Society A Winter 2015 SOC

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/people/emilio-zagheni (2016-04-27)
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  • Immigration or Welfare? The Progressive’s Dilemma Revisited | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    Connected Support Us Contact Us You are here Home Research Publications Immigration or Welfare The Progressive s Dilemma Revisited Kulin Joakim Maureen A Eger and Mikael Hjerm 2016 Immigration or Welfare The Progressive s Dilemma Revisited Socius Sociological Research for a Dynamic World vol 2 2378023116632223 Previous cross national research on the link between immigration and the welfare state has focused exclusively on the relationship between the size of a country s foreign born population and support for redistribution neglecting that people vary in their responses to immigration In this article the authors revisit the progressive s dilemma by testing its theoretical proposition that immigration and welfare are incompatible in two novel ways First the authors conduct an individual level analysis that demonstrates that for most Europeans supporting both immigration and welfare is unlikely Second the authors assess whether country level immigration is associated with the salience of different immigration welfare attitudes but find little evidence that immigration measured at the country level produces the most exclusive attitudes People Involved Maureen Eger Status of Research Completed published Research Type Publications Essays and Articles Related Fields Comparative Sociology Immigration Political Sociology Public Opinion Race and Ethnicity Social Welfare Share Print PDF Related Fields Comparative Sociology Immigration Political Sociology Public Opinion Race and Ethnicity Social Welfare Support Us Give to Sociology Stay Connected Facebook News Feed Mailing List Alumni Update Main Menu People Faculty Core Faculty Emeritus Faculty Adjuncts Affiliates Postdocs Visitors Staff Graduate Students Job Market Candidates Alumni Alumni News Alumni Update Programs Courses Undergraduate Meet With an Advisor Applying to Sociology Current Majors Practicum Special Programs Undergraduate Blog Sociology Writing Center Graduate Program Overview Admissions Faculty Advising Recent Ph D Dissertations Nitty Gritty Manual Resources for Graduate Students The Graduate School at UW Featured Courses Course Offerings Graduation Graduation FAQ

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/publications/immigration-or-welfare-progressives-dilemma-revisited (2016-04-27)
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  • Neo-nationalism in Western Europe  | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    A and Sarah Valdez 2015 Neo nationalism in Western Europe European Sociological Review 31 1 115 130 The increasing popularity of radical right parties in Western Europe has received widespread attention Despite a rather large literature on parties with explicitly anti immigrant platforms there is surprisingly little consensus about the underlying political ideology of this party family and its supporters Particularly lacking is cross national research that maps party positions in two dimensional political space over time Using Manifesto Project Data 1970 2010 we analyse election platforms of parties the literature has identified as radical right and show that they have qualitatively changed between 1970 and 2010 Current parties differ fundamentally from their predecessors in that nationalist claims are paramount We use the European Social Survey 2002 2010 to confirm that voters attitudes are consistent with contemporary parties platforms Our results point to a coherent political ideology which may partially explain these parties recent electoral successes Based on our combined analyses we conclude that contemporary anti immigrant parties constitute a new and distinct party family which we term neo nationalist People Involved Maureen Eger Status of Research Completed published Research Type Publications Essays and Articles Related Fields Comparative Historical Sociology Comparative Politics Comparative Sociology Immigration Nationalism Political Sociology Social Welfare West European Share Print PDF Related Fields Comparative Historical Sociology Comparative Politics Comparative Sociology Immigration Nationalism Political Sociology Social Welfare West European Support Us Give to Sociology Stay Connected Facebook News Feed Mailing List Alumni Update Main Menu People Faculty Core Faculty Emeritus Faculty Adjuncts Affiliates Postdocs Visitors Staff Graduate Students Job Market Candidates Alumni Alumni News Alumni Update Programs Courses Undergraduate Meet With an Advisor Applying to Sociology Current Majors Practicum Special Programs Undergraduate Blog Sociology Writing Center Graduate Program Overview Admissions Faculty Advising Recent Ph D Dissertations Nitty

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/publications/neo-nationalism-western-europe (2016-04-27)
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  • How Far Up the River? Assessing the Consequences of Criminal Justice Contact | Department of Sociology | University of Washington
    during this period investigating the effects of less severe forms of criminal justice contact is integral to understanding the full consequences of contact The conditions and circumstances that render long term incarceration impactful are also present for arrests convictions and jail stays Contact of any form and degree causes separation from society which can hinder the attainment and maintenance of employment Furthermore the stigma from a criminal or arrest record can inhibit employment prospects and wage growth due to the proliferation of background checks for potential employees severed job networks On the health side the exposure to individuals with communicable diseases facilitates the transmission of disease while the stress of incarceration and lack of adequate medical facilities assist in exacerbating existing conditions The stress and strain of even low level contact can facilitate the worsening of both physical and mental health outcomes Using the NLSY97 this project explores employment and health outcomes as a result of arrests convictions and jail stays Results show that both wages and consistency of employment are detrimentally affected by an arrest arrest without conviction and jail time The findings show a potential incapacitation effect of low level criminal justice contact that has short lived but substantial impacts on employment outcomes For health the results find that low level forms of contact negatively impact both physical and mental health outcomes throughout the trajectory of the criminal justice system However there is a short lived positive impact on physical health due to the basic health care provided in the carceral institution These results point to the salience of exploring all levels of contact in order to fully ascertain how the criminal justice system impacts levels of stratification and disadvantage People Involved April Fernandes Adviser s Robert Crutchfield Hedwig Hedy Lee Jerald R Herting Status of Research Completed

    Original URL path: https://soc.washington.edu/graduate/how-far-river-assessing-consequences-criminal-justice-contact-0 (2016-04-27)
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