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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    embarking on a new program that will prepare the next generation of mathematics teachers in Detroit The project TeachDETROIT will prepare elementary and middle school mathematics teachers for Detroit Schools at a time that United States students lag behind their international peers in mathematics achievement We are facing a critical challenge because proficiency in mathematics is essential for entry to college access to employment and economic well being said Jennifer Lewis Ph D assistant professor of Mathematics Education in the College of Education at WSU and principal investigator on the grant This grant has come at a very important time as student scores in mathematics on the National Assessment of Educational Progress have dropped to among the lowest in the country In conjunction with Henry Ford College the Detroit Public Schools and Wayne Westland Community Schools Wayne State University will recruit train and induct 56 new elementary and middle school mathematics teachers for Detroit Schools The project will provide scholarships and stipends to highly qualified candidates to support their participation in an innovative urban teacher residency program for 15 months as they work with outstanding mentors in elementary and middle school classrooms This project will create a model to prepare new teachers to be successful especially in high poverty schools with children of color and ultimately will contribute to educational research Those participating in the project will receive substantial training that will help them to teach mathematics for understanding design and carry out sophisticated assessments of student progress develop skills to work with diverse students analyze data and adjust instruction as needed said Lewis Preparing successful math teachers is challenging particularly since mathematics instruction has changed from the mathematics classes many teachers remember from childhood This program is a great example of Wayne State s commitment to focusing on urban

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=18085 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    List 3 million NSF grant to transform STEM teaching approaches at Wayne State University October 27 2015 DETROIT The National Science Foundation NSF has awarded a 3 million grant to Wayne State University for an institutional transformation project aimed at reformulating teaching approaches in STEM courses The grant Student Success Through Evidence based Pedagogies SSTEP will be divided into competitive awards of up to 100 000 and allocated to STEM departments Successful departments will work to transform their classes from a lecture based curriculum to incorporate more evidence based instructional practices Through this program students will experience engaged learning while faculty postdoctoral fellows and graduate students will be trained in modern evidence based teaching methods This grant will have a remarkable impact on our teaching approaches across campus and will ultimately improve the academic success of our students said Andrew Feig principal investigator associate dean of the Graduate School and professor of chemistry at WSU The NSF is investing in us to demonstrate that these types of institutional grants can help us provide better outcomes for our students and serve as a model for improving STEM education nationwide This grant will create a culture of evidence based teaching approaches in STEM areas at WSU and ultimately engage more students in choosing STEM majors decreasing their time to degree and building their career and future educational opportunities said Gloria Heppner associate vice president for Research at Wayne State With a large portion of our student body comprised of non traditional and underrepresented minorities improved teaching practices will lead to significant increases in retention and graduation rates of these students Other College of Liberal Arts and Sciences CLAS faculty members leading the SSTEP grant include Robert Bruner professor of mathematics Karen Myhr professor of biology and Peter Hoffmann CLAS associate dean and

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17975 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    to 30 percent by 2050 Insulin a hormone made in the pancreas helps cells absorb glucose and convert it into energy Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body produces insulin but the insulin sensitive tissues e g skeletal muscle do not use it effectively Excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream leading to type 2 diabetes and other serious health disorders such as cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease Obesity and lack of physical activity contribute to the problem however the exact causes of insulin resistance are not completely understood Most research related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes focuses on kinases a group of enzymes that change the function and activity of proteins by adding phosphate groups to them Yi and his team are taking a different approach by studying another group of enzymes called phosphatases that do the exact opposite they regulate activity of proteins by removing phosphate groups from them It is known that protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12 PPP1R12 controls the activity of protein phosphatase 1 one of the major phosphatases Nonetheless little is known about how PPP1R12 contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes We suspect that there are lower amounts of PPP1R12 and abnormal interactions involving PPP1R12 in skeletal muscle of obese non diabetic individuals and obese type 2 diabetes patients as compared to healthy lean individuals said Yi We believe lower levels of PPP1R12 contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes We plan to test this hypothesis by using a combination of clinical studies in vitro cell studies and cutting edge proteomics studies to measure the physiological processes associated with these conditions identify possible causes and analyze how cells react to their environment The five year grant for the study Serine Threonine

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17961 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State s Alexey Petrov named 2015 American Physical Society Fellow October 13 2015 DETROIT Wayne State University Physics and Astronomy Professor Alexey A Petrov has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society APS for contributions to heavy flavor physics in particular studies of charm quarks and contributions to indirect searches for physics beyond the Standard Model Election as an APS fellow is a major recognition and distinct honor of professional accomplishment in this leading organization of physicists Each year only one half of one percent of the membership is elected as fellows by one s professional peers according to the society Petrov is one of 15 Wayne State University faculty who hold this distinctive title Petrov has been a faculty member in Wayne State s Department of Physics and Astronomy since 2001 His research focuses on theoretical physics of elementary particles as well as astrophysics This fellowship is a reflection of the high quality of research Alexey has produced across his entire career said David Cinabro chair of Wayne State s Department of Physics and Astronomy This isn t just an honor for him but for our entire department Petrov received his Ph D and M S degrees from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and his Diploma from St Petersburg Technical University now known as Peter the Great St Petersburg Polytechnic University His research is currently funded by the U S Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation The APS was founded in 1899 and its mission is to

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17879 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    a scale of this magnitude said Wilson The Integrative Biosciences Center embodies what it means to be a public urban research university creating and sharing knowledge that contributes immensely to improving the quality of life for its surrounding community Research conducted in this center will also have important applications in other urban communities around the world Metabolic disorders including diabetes and obesity which disproportionately affect certain segments of the population are among the major urban health issues researchers will focus on at IBio Hypertension the leading cause of America s leading cause of death heart disease affects African Americans at an alarmingly higher rate than other groups Cardiovascular disease specifically heart disease prevention is another area of disparity that IBio research teams will focus on Faculty with expertise in environmental science bio and systems engineering heart disease diabetes obesity asthma and biobehavioral health will work side by side at IBio The new laboratories will also be used to recruit expert faculty from around the country to join the fight WSU plans to recruit more than 30 new faculty members for research and development programs in integrative biosciences Phase 1 occupation of IBio includes research teams focused on metabolic diseases bio and systems engineering behavioral health cardiovascular health disparities a clinical research center with a disease specific biorepository and the Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors which is supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Wayne State Vice President of Research Stephen Lanier believes IBio researchers have an opportunity to create a national center of excellence for a number of the diseases ailing Detroit s population in far greater numbers than the rest of the country All of the research teams environmental sciences biobehavioral health cardiovascular health metabolic disorders bio and systems engineering and systems biology will be

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17871 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    is taking place in Vancouver Oct 4 9 Dr Hassan a professor of the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine in the WSU Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and director of the Center for Advanced Obstetrical Care and Research for the Perinatology Research Branch at WSU was instrumental in developing the modalities now recommended as worldwide best practices for preterm birth prediction and prevention Those recommendations include Sonographic cervical length screening through transvaginal ultrasound in all women between19 and 23 and 6 7 weeks pregnant Researchers for WSU and the PRB found that women with a short cervix one that is less than or equal to 25 millimeters long are at risk for premature birth Women with a cervical length less than or equal to 25 mm should be treated with daily vaginal progesterone for the prevention of preterm birth and neonatal morbidity In 2011 the team at the Perinatology Research Branch led by Roberto Romero M D D Med Sci and housed at WSU and the Detroit Medical Center discovered that the use of progesterone in mothers identified as at risk for premature birth cut that risk by nearly half The study showed that the rate of preterm delivery in women less than 33 weeks into their pregnancy can be reduced by 45 percent by treating the women with a low cost gel of natural progesterone The inexpensive gel is applied by the mother intravaginally daily The Working Group on Best Practice declared universal cervical length screening and vaginal progesterone is a cost effective model for the prevention of preterm birth In cases in which transvaginal ultrasound is not available other methods to assess cervical length can be considered At least 15 million babies worldwide are born prematurely each year and preterm birth related deaths are one of the leading

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17844 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    the grandchildren was published online this week in Scientific Reports It s a known fact that babies in the womb can be affected by low levels of lead exposure If a pregnant woman is exposed to lead the lead passes through the placenta into the baby s developing bones and other organs Pregnant women with a past exposure to lead can also affect the unborn child s brain causing developmental problems later in life Previous research studies have suggested that exposure to heavy metal toxicants can influence a person s global DNA methylation profile In the recent Wayne State study led by Douglas Ruden Ph D professor in the Department of Obstetrics Gynecology and the Institute of Environmental Health Sciences director of epigenomics and program leader in the Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors he and his research team revealed that lead exposure can cause specific changes in DNA methylation which can be detected in dried blood spots beyond one generation The neonatal blood spots from both the mothers and children in this study were obtained from the Michigan Neonatal Biobank a unique resource that has most of the neonatal dried blood spots from children born in Michigan since 1984 According to Ruden epigenetic effects of environmental exposures beyond one generation have not yet been demonstrated in humans prior to this study He and his team tested the hypothesis that human fetal germ cell exposure to environmental toxins causes epigenetic changes in the newborn blood from a grandchild of an exposed pregnant woman Our results suggest that lead exposure during pregnancy affects the DNA methylation status of the fetal germ cells which leads to altered DNA methylation in grandchildren s neonatal dried blood spots said Ruden This is the first demonstration that an environmental exposure in pregnant mothers can

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17800 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    define RNA biosignatures that allow precise diagnosis of isolated bacterial infections isolated viral infections and bacterial viral co infections The investigators will also validate the RNA biosignatures on a novel PCR based platform that has a rapid turnaround time of two to four hours as opposed to current methods of bacterial cultures that often take up to 48 hours for results The evaluation of well appearing febrile infants continues to be challenging and controversial for clinicians Their immune system is immature and even otherwise normal infants are unable to protect themselves from invasive bacterial diseases such as meningitis bacteremia and urinary tract infections Fever is the most common reason for infants to be brought to emergency departments and approximately 250 000 very young febrile infants are taken to emergency rooms across the United States annually In addition many more are brought to pediatricians and other health care settings and thus this continues to be one of the most vexing issues in pediatrics Dr Mahajan said that less than 5 percent of febrile infants will have an invasive or serious bacterial illness These infants are clinically indistinguishable from the majority of the febrile infants with non bacterial illness However the outcomes such as bacterial meningitis severe sepsis and potentially death are devastating More importantly the current standard use of bacterial cultures for diagnosis is suboptimal In particular culture results are reported after 24 to 48 hours are not helpful for clinical decision making at the patient s bedside Dr Mahajan and his collaborators Dr Octavio Ramilo of Nationwide Children s Hospital The Ohio State University and Dr Nathan Kuppermann of the University of California Davis Medical Center have been researching the evaluation of the febrile infant for 15 years and have been continuously funded in their efforts since 2008 The investigative team initially received a 600 000 Targeted Issues Grant H34MC08509 from Heath Resources Services Administration HRSA as part of the Emergency Medical Services for Children to create an infrastructure to study febrile infants in U S emergency departments through a federally supported network of approximately 20 pediatric emergency departments called Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network After establishing the infrastructure Dr Mahajan and his collaborators were awarded 3 15 million R01HD062477 from the NICHD to further define and validate the bacterial and non bacterial biosignatures of febrile infants Their findings demonstrated that it is possible to identify bacterial infections from non bacterial infections by RNA biosignatures in emergency departments with 95 percent accuracy This award will aid in the development of a potentially paradigm shifting approach of a new more precise efficient and rapid laboratory diagnostic strategies Dr Mahajan said This would allow for a less invasive quicker and more accurate cost effective evaluation of young febrile infants while bringing this exciting technology to patient s bedside If successful it will substantially impact the care of thousands of febrile infants across the world Dr Mahajan s research is highly timely and translational in nature in that it will allow for

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=17705 (2016-02-13)
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