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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    named in memory of Luis Villalobos who angel investors nationwide admired for actively investing in and mentoring ingenious creative and innovative startups Zhuo Hua Pan Ph D scientific director of the Ligon Research Center of Vision at the Kresge Eye Institute the Edward T and Ellen K Dryer Endowed Professor in Vision and Blindness Research in the Department of Ophthalmology and professor of anatomy and cell biology in Wayne State University s School of Medicine along with colleagues at Salus University in Pennsylvania developed the breakthrough optogenetic approaches to restore vision through the use of a light sensitive protein from green algae to confer new light sensitivity in the retinas in which rod and cone photoreceptors have degenerated As one of the advantages the optogenetic approaches have the potential to treat all forms of blindness due to the death of photoceptors independent of causative gene or mutation This is a very unique and significant discovery developed right here in Detroit and it will be a major step forward in the lives of patients with vision challenges said Kresge Eye Institute Director and Department of Ophthalmology Chair Mark Juzych M D 89 This honor will help RetroSense and Dr Pan find additional funding to move the technology forward in to the clinical setting They are most deserving of this outstanding award RetroSense Therapeutics LLC licensed the patented technology and is to develop the optogenetic gene therapies designed to restore vision in patients suffering from blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa RP and advanced dry age related macular degeneration advanced dry AMD There are currently no FDA approved drugs to improve or restore vision in patients with these retinal degenerative conditions In 2014 the company was granted Orphan Drug designation for the treatment of RP by the U S Food and Drug Administration

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16707 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Development PAD Seminar Series Research Orientation for New Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State Arts professor receives prestigious Frankel Institute fellowship April 14 2015 Thanks to research underwritten with internal funding from Wayne State University s Research Enhancement Program Jeffrey Abt professor of Art and Art History in the College of Fine Performing and Communication Arts was selected for a fellowship at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan His fellowship project will investigate the interanimations of secularization and sacralization in late nineteenth and twentieth century exhibitions of Jewish ritual objects Using the Jewish Museum of New York as a primary example he will examine three periods of significant and revealing changes including the museum s prehistory in late nineteenth century expositions in Europe and America the museum s creation and use within the Jewish Theological Seminary and its emergence as a separate public presence in New York s tumultuous post World War II art world The fellowship will enable me to expand and complete research for my Wayne State University Research Enhancement Program book project in particular the Jewish Museum of New York s avant garde exhibition program of the late 1950 s to early 1980 s said Abt The Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan provides annual fellowships for scholars and artists from around the world to conduct research in relation to a given theme Established through a generous financial contribution from the Jean and Samuel Frankel Jewish Heritage Foundation the Frankel Institute is the only

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16682 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research

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    Original URL path: /news.php?id=16581 (2016-02-13)


  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    bone marrow transplant for the Karmanos Cancer Institute and professor of oncology medicine for the Wayne State University School of Medicine Nai Kong Cheung M D Ph D head of the Neuroblastoma Program and Enid A Haupt chair of Pediatric Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering and Shakeel Modak M D associate member at Memorial Sloan Kettering Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric solid cancer and osteosarcoma is the most common cancerous bone tumor in children and young adults Despite significant improvements in treatment the disease returns after chemotherapy in nearly four out of 10 newly diagnosed cases of high risk neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma Recently a new treatment called antibody immunotherapy made long awaited improvements in the survival of high risk neuroblastoma patients for the first time in almost 30 years Despite advances with immunotherapy the disease still recurs in a number of high risk neuroblastoma patients even after treatment with monoclonal antibodies manufactured to specifically attack neuroblastoma Under the leadership of Dr Lum and Dr Yankelevich with the support of Jeffrey Taub M D FAAP chief of oncology on staff at the Children s Hospital of Michigan and professor of pediatrics for the Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers have begun an investigational new treatment involving antibody therapy called Bispecific Antibody Armed T Cells BATs The therapy combines cell and antibody targeted therapy to clean up remaining cancerous cells to prevent relapse after chemotherapy The new investigational research involves using the patient s own immune T Killer cells a type of immune cell that fights cancer by 1 activating and expanding these T cells outside the body to produce billions of them 2 targeting neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma by arming the T cells with the humanized bispecific antibody hu3F8 developed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center The antibody binds to GD2 protein disialoganglioside expressed on tumors of neuroectodermal origin on neuroblastoma osteosarcomas and CD3 cluster of differentiation 3 on T cells and 3 introducing the BATs back into patients to destroy tumors and trigger immune responses against neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma tumors This approach has been tested successfully in other clinical settings including treatment for metastatic breast cancer by Dr Lum who is nationally and internationally known for pioneering the development of BATs designing clinical trials and administering BATs to patients The study using armed T cells for women with metastatic breast cancer showed an overall survival of 37 months more than twice the overall survival in most clinical trials Dr Lum said We have demonstrated successful treatment not only with breast cancer but also with multiple myeloma non Hodgkin s lymphoma and gastrointestinal cancers It is especially encouraging that all of the patients treated to date have not experienced any dose limiting side effects The study aims to establish the safe dose of armed anti GD2 T cells in children with neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma Approximately 45 children at the Children s Hospital of Michigan and Memorial Sloan Kettering will participate in the study It feels great to take the next

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16414 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Health Initiative from 1993 to 1998 and were followed through July 2013 by participating initiative sites including Wayne State University We were surprised to observe a protective effect of lycopene as several previous studies in other populations did not detect a similar relationship Bock said The results are explained in Antioxidant micronutrients and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the Women s Health Initiative cohort featured in the Feb 15 issue of Cancer The investigators analyzed the risks for kidney cancer associated with intake of lycopene and other micronutrients that have antioxidant properties including lutein and vitamins C and E During follow up 240 women were diagnosed with kidney cancer Compared with women who reported a lower intake of lycopene those who ingested more had a 39 percent lower risk No other micronutrient was significantly associated with the same risk The 63 920 estimated new cases of kidney and renal pelvis cancer in 2014 made up 3 8 percent of all new cancer cases according to the National Cancer Institute s Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program In 2011 there were an estimated 358 603 people living with the cancer in the United States It is the eighth leading cancer among women and is commonly diagnosed at a more advance stage Kidney cancer is a relatively rare cancer and so focusing only on reducing risk of this disease would be short sighted Bock said Rather a diet focused on one s own personal risk factors such as family history would be more beneficial A low salt diet is recommended for women with a risk of hypertension a major risk factor for kidney cancer There are other steps women can take now for their health including eating more foods and fruits with naturally occurring lycopene Lycopene from food sources has

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16374 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    to Wayne State University aims to determine causes of seismic anisotropy March 2 2015 DETROIT Wayne State University s Sarah Jo Brownlee Ph D assistant professor of geology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has been awarded a National Science Foundation NSF Faculty Early Career Development CAREER Award the foundation s most prestigious accolade for up and coming young faculty members Brownlee who joined the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 2011 received the grant totaling more than 520 000 for her proposal Seismic Anisotropy Symmetry and Structure Translating Laboratory Measurements into Seismic Interpretations Along with a team of graduate scholars Brownlee will use the five year award to continue her research on the causes of seismic anisotropy a property of Earth materials where seismic waves travel at different speeds depending on the direction of wave propagation in the lower continental crust of the Earth Brownlee will focus her research on gneiss domes in New Hampshire and Vermont According to Brownlee this award will fund much more than research The star faculty member has already developed the structure of a new WSU geology course that will immerse undergraduate students from all areas of study in geological fieldwork and research The Team Research course aims to increase the number and diversity of undergraduate students participating in research at an urban university and increase the diversity of undergraduate geology majors and ultimately spark their interest in pursuing a graduate degree Team Research will be built around a tiered peer mentoring system where equal proportions of introductory intermediate and advanced undergraduate students work in teams during a semester long course where they will design and implement a field research project relevant to the scientific objectives of Brownlee s study This award is a tremendous confidence boost Brownlee said It s

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16372 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Professional and Academic Development PAD Seminar Series Research Orientation for New Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State physics professor receives prestigious NSF Faculty Early Career Award February 24 2015 Research to impact understanding of the vesicle transport system of cells and develop summer K 12 physics program for metro Detroit area students DETROIT Wayne State University s Takeshi Sakamoto biophysicist and assistant professor in the Department of Physics Astronomy in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has been awarded the National Science Foundation NSF Faculty Early Career Development CAREER Award the agency s most prestigious award for up and coming researchers in science and engineering The five year 692 000 grant was awarded for Sakamoto s project Determine the mechanical properties of molecular motor in vesicle transports Vesicles in cells are transported by molecular motors to the cell periphery for secretion in response to various physiological and pathological signals Zymogen granules are huge vesicles 1 micro meter diameter in pancreatic acinar cells for digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion Sakamoto will investigate how molecular motors transport such large vesicles and the mechanisms motors use to enforce chemical energy to mechanical force He will apply his state of the art light microscope and imaging technique to understand the vesicle transportation system As a part of this award he will develop a K 12 summer program for metro Detroit area students to understand light and microscopes with hands on projects Sakamoto received his Ph D from Kanazawa University Japan and did his postdoctoral fellowship at the National Heart Lung

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=16336 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IACUC Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee SCRO Research Misconduct Contact Us Division of Laboratory Animal Resources Research Communications News Releases RWNews New Science Publicizing Research Accomplishments Research Funding Opportunities Internal Funding Opportunities Limited Submissions Funding Opportunities Searching for External Funding Opportunities Research Seminars Training Professional and Academic Development PAD Seminar Series Research Orientation for New Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List New Policy on Required Training in the Responsible Conduct of Research Announced May 16 2011 Wayne State University is committed to complying with the requirements of the National Science Foundation NSF and the National Institutes of Health NIH to provide training in the Responsible Conduct of Research RCR to relevant personnel who are funded by these agencies to conduct research In response to updated requirements from NSF and NIH WSU offers a basic RCR course that can be applied toward these training requirements This online course employs a curriculum available through the Collaborative

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=6652 (2016-02-13)
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