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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research

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    Original URL path: /news.php?id=5689 (2016-02-13)


  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List First road in Michigan newly designated on National Register of Historic Places nominated by Wayne State anthropology student February 7 2011 DETROIT Daniel Harrison an anthropology graduate student in Wayne State University s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has garnered some long overdue attention for an important Michigan landmark just in time for the feature s 200th birthday Hull s Trace a supply line from central Ohio to Detroit built under Michigan Territory Governor William Hull on the eve of the War of 1812 was Michigan s first road as well as the first military road in the new nation Commissioned under President Thomas Jefferson to counter British control of Lake Erie the route was hastily blazed through the forested interior by some 2 000 American troops using the trees they felled to solidify swampy areas Laid crosswise the logs became a bone jarring but serviceable corduroy road One such marsh was the mouth of the Huron River near the Wyandot Indian village of Brownstown located south of Detroit The Hull s Trace North Huron River Corduroy Segment as it is now designated caught the eye of Harrison a master s candidate focusing on historical archaeology Harrison surveyed the mostly submerged logs while doing coursework with WSU archaeologists Thomas Killion and Tamara Bray His research indicated that the 380 meter wooden roadway now part of the embankment supporting southern Jefferson Avenue represented the only known surviving portion of the original 200 mile road This unique structure demanded to be preserved said Harrison It s associated with our frontier past with historic figures like Chief Tecumseh and William Henry Harrison and with a civil engineering technique that is virtually absent from the archaeological record

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5686 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Carol Miller Ph D P E professor and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Wayne State University s College of Engineering was recently appointed to the Great Lakes Science Advisory Board SAB by the International Joint Commission IJC Miller was appointed for a two year term effective Dec 31 2010 SAB established in 1978 assists the IJC as scientific advisor to restore and maintain the chemical physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem The SAB is developing recommendations on matters related to research and the development of scientific knowledge pertinent to the identification evaluation and resolution of current and anticipated problems related to water quality in the Great Lakes The board comprises eight members from the U S and eight from Canada Miller is an active water resources researcher focusing on both surface and subsurface water quality and quantity and has more recently investigated the water energy interface She is especially active in urban environmental issues and helped to launch the Urban Watershed Environmental Research Group UWERG which is geared to save protect and improve what s left of the urban pockets of fresh water throughout the Great Lake region Miller and colleagues are developing a system control environment that will optimize the energy consumption of large water utilities such as the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department while improving the health of the Great Lakes The software has the potential to reduce the energy required to run large water utilities by 15 percent while improving the health of the Great Lakes through reduced polluting emissions With WSU s presence near the banks of the Huron to Erie Corridor it s especially important that we play a major role in the protection of the Great Lakes resource Miller said Being named

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5656 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research

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    Original URL path: /news.php?id=5643 (2016-02-13)


  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    26 2011 NextCAT Inc a Detroit based company announced that it has received 250 000 in seed funding from Automation Alley in Troy Mich NextCAT is commercializing biodiesel catalyst technology developed at the National Biofuels Energy Lab at Wayne State University that will allow biodiesel producers to use cost effective raw materials Founded in 2009 NextCAT is commercializing a class of catalysts that enable producers to use a wide variety of inexpensive feedstock such as waste vegetable oil animal fats and residual corn oil and convert them into biodiesel NextCAT offers a unique solution for an industry that has been mostly idled in the United States since 2008 when rising feedstock prices and the price drop of petroleum diesel made the production of biodiesel uneconomical With a cost savings of at least 1 per gallon the NextCAT solution greatly changes the economics of a biodiesel plant We have a technology that has been proven in the lab by the science team at Wayne State University s National Biofuels Energy Lab said Charles Salley CEO of NextCAT Inc This seed funding from Automation Alley allows us to begin to design build and install a reactor in an idle biodiesel plant in Michigan This investment of 250 000 in NextCAT from Automation Alley brings the total amount of investment funding to date to 600 000 Additionally we have been awarded 205 000 in grant funding The science team of Dr Steven Salley associate professor of chemical engineering College of Engineering Dr Shuli Yan research director at NextCAT and I are excited to see our technology progressing toward usage by the biodiesel producers and we look forward to a successful production demonstration later this year said Simon Ng Ph D chief technology officer at NextCAT interim associate dean for research in Wayne State

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5641 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    means better health care quality Wayne State University study finds January 20 2011 Hector M González DETROIT Wayne State University researchers have found that when patients and providers speak the same language patients report less confusion and better health care quality The findings were based on data from the Pew Hispanic Center Robert Wood Johnson Foundation s Latino Health Survey Understanding the relationship between language and health care quality has important public health implications for providing services in an increasingly diverse U S population according to Hector M González Ph D assistant professor of family medicine and public health at WSU s Institute of Gerontology and School of Medicine So often we see that health care providers and researchers blame patients not fluent in English for not adhering to medical prescriptions and treatments when the problem may be that patients simply don t understand the clinician González said Today there are over 60 million Americans who speak languages other than English and that will rapidly grow in coming years That s a big market that savvy health care providers should not ignore he said The study led by González appears in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine With Latinos expected to comprise more than a third of the U S population in the coming decades practitioners and medical schools need to think about how they want to best serve this changing patient population Eliminating disparities in health care is a major priority in the United States and the Agency for HealthCare Research and Quality has emphasized the importance of removing language barriers to shrink such disparities We have the most sophisticated health care system in the world however it does little good if patients and providers fail to communicate González said There may be low tech perhaps

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5616 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    were destined to develop cognitive decline within 18 months of testing John Woodard Ph D associate professor of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Institute of Gerontology at Wayne State University is lead author of Predicting Cognitive Decline in Healthy Older Adults Using fMRI published in the Journal of Alzheimer s Disease vol 21 no 3 No one had studied these combinations of tests in such a large sample Woodard said The results have strong implications for determining who is most likely to benefit from preventive Alzheimer s disease treatments Woodard and his colleagues performed five tests on 78 healthy elders a structural MRI sMRI that measures the size of the hippocampal region of the brain a functional MRI fMRI that shows how the brain is activated during mental tasks a blood test that identifies the APOE ε4 allele a known genetic marker for Alzheimer s disease and two standard neuropsychological tests that measure mood and ability The most effective combination of tests to predict near term cognitive decline was the fMRI and the APOE ε4 test The APOE ε4 allele alone correctly classified 61 5 percent of participants but the combination of the ε4 allele and low activity on the fMRI test correctly classified 78 9 percent of participants including 35 percent who showed significant cognitive decline 18 months post testing Age years of education gender and family history of dementia were not accurate predictors of future cognitive decline Dr Woodard and his colleagues also found that persons with larger hippocampal volume greater functional brain activity and no APOE ε4 allele were less likely to demonstrate cognitive decline over the following 18 months The APOE and fMRI tests that combined as the best predictors are readily available not time consuming and don t require special

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5567 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    to ease information overload for software developers January 14 2011 Andrian Marcus Ph D Wayne State University Modern technologies including the Internet e mail text messages and an array of social media options have grown in recent years to offer an infinite amount of information to consume A Wayne State University researcher has teamed up with West Virginia University WVU to make life s daily data load more manageable and less distracting Andrian Marcus Ph D associate professor of computer science in WSU s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is collaborating with Tim Menzies Ph D associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering in the College of Engineering and Mineral Resources at WVU in hopes to ease the distractions and stress of information overload faced by programmers during software development Marcus and Menzies recently received a 500 000 National Science Foundation award with 256 000 directed to WSU for their project Better Comprehension of Software Engineering Data which aims to make software developers work more efficiently Software systems today are larger and more complex They are built over many years by hundreds of developers The amount of data in software systems that a developer has to deal with is staggering Marcus said We aim to produce tools and techniques that will allow software developers and managers to easily customize data mining techniques to help software development work Already widely used by scientists in many fields data mining techniques are in need of adaptation to work with software data Data mining methods first blew up in the early 1990s with successes such as Google said Marcus For the mainstream software developer however the methods are difficult to understand We will put the task of prioritizing and processing information into simpler easily utilized terms Marcus and Menzies are looking at

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5559 (2016-02-13)
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