archive-edu.com » EDU » W » WAYNE.EDU

Total: 427

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    and lower incidence of heart disease and heart failure when occurring together a new study by a Wayne State University researcher finds J P Jin M D Ph D professor and chair of physiology in Wayne State University s School of Medicine was published in the Sept 3 2010 issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry The study revealed that mutations occurring in troponin I TnI and troponin T TnT two evolutionary and functionally linked proteins in the regulatory system of the cardiac muscle mutually cancel out each other s negative effects and restore the heart to a normal condition The mutations which frequently co occur in wild turkeys offer a novel target for new treatments in human heart diseases such as congestive heart failure and cardiomyopathy diseases associated with the deterioration of the function of the heart muscle The current work builds off a previous study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry in 2004 in which Jin and his students discovered that a mutation in cardiac TnI in wild turkey hearts may provide a fitness advantage by rescuing the effects of a heart failure mutation in cardiac TnT In the current study Jin s research group duplicated the mutations using transgenic mice to examine the extent to which the two mutations influence the function of the cardiac muscle The study found that abnormally spliced myopathic cardiac TnT impairs systolic function weakening the heart muscle and causing heart failure The second mutation a single amino acid substitution in cardiac TnI was found to cause inadequate relaxation of the heart muscle decreasing the diastolic function to cause heart failure Jin s study also found however that when occurring together the mutations mutually rescued the heart from the damaging effects in the transgenic mice TnI and TnT make up two of

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5369 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    liquid water transforms into a rubber like solid when squeezed at a certain rate The study is featured in the Oct 15 2010 issue of Nature India and the Sept 2010 issue of Physical Review Letters with a special Viewpoint written by well known researchers from University of Illinois Only 100 out of 18 000 papers in this prestigious journal are selected for a Viewpoint review each year The study has shed new light on the nanofluidics debate over the nature of confined water s mechanical properties Water which makes up nearly 70 percent of the human body is nanoconfined between proteins that make up the cell s organelles Usually the water in our cells is considered as a rather static bystander said Hoffmann But water is the most important liquid in the universe because it is the one essential ingredient we need to support life Knowing how water behaves in tiny channels and tiny spaces is important for the design of future devices that would for example probe arterial blood and continually measure blood sugar or other markers Hoffmann explored how water reacts when its molecules are gently squeezed at speeds so slow it would take a few months to just cover a distance of one foot he said Yet the impact of this speed as Hoffmann and his colleagues have proved alters water s behavior drastically When we squeezed water at a speed of 0 8 nanometers per second and beyond until the tip reached the surface the water suddenly changed from a viscous honey like liquid to an almost solid like material that reacted elastically like rubber said Hoffmann A sensitive atomic force microscope AFM that was built by his team made these precise nanoscale measurements possible Hoffmann and his team also saw that water spontaneously orders

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5356 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    have engaged several community partners to participate in the Detroit Community Network Program CNP receiving a 2 million grant over a five year period from the NCI one of 25 such programs nationally The Detroit CNP served as a community based participatory education training and research collaboration to address the disparities of older African Americans in the city of Detroit Dr Chapman from the Josephine Ford Cancer Center JFCC realized that even with great programming older African Americans still tended to be diagnosed with late stage cancer As he put it We had a real problem right under our noses and needed to do something about it In 2006 Dr Chapman s program was selected as one of six sites nationally for the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services CMS Demonstration Project for community based patient navigation to enroll Medicaid eligible African American seniors in cancer screening The program resulted in thousands of older African Americans being screened and they were empowered to see their primary care physician for additional care Dr Albrecht and Dr Chapman have collaborated informally since 2006 recognizing that their work complements each others rather than competes With the help of Karmanos CNP partner organizations and the JFCC CMS screening program nearly 5 900 African American seniors were enrolled in cancer screenings more than any other CMS Demonstration Project nationally Together these programs impacted nearly 7 000 African American seniors providing cancer education screening and research efforts These efforts now serve as the foundation for the Southeast Michigan Partners Against Cancer an expansion to serve underserved older African Americans throughout the tri county area of southeast Michigan The Southeast Michigan Partners Against Cancer is powerful community collaboration that will move the needle forward in reducing racial disparities and cancer deaths among underserved African Americans in our area says Nancy Schlichting president and chief executive officer of Henry Ford Health System This partnership is best poised to not only improve cancer screening and early diagnosis for African Americans but ensure that patients get the best and most advanced cancer care available Southeast Michigan Partners Against Cancer SEMPAC The partnership will collaborate with several community agencies to help carry out practical intervention elements to achieve results SEMPAC s goal to reduce cancer disparities of older underserved African Americans within southeast Michigan improving early detection diagnosis treatment and survivorship will be achieved by enhancing communication skills behavioral attitude and information exchange with the help of a patient advocate so that older underserved African Americans have the best chance of high quality intervention for early diagnosis and treatment especially related to breast prostate colorectal and lung cancers enhancing the cultural understanding for those who provide treatment to assure that communication is understood between the patient and the health provider building on the growing trust of patients and the community to enhance the collection of biospecimens for research and clinical studies and recruiting and training future researchers and physicians to better work with and for the community to reduce cancer disparities Valerie

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5352 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    for New Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State University engineering professor receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers November 8 2010 DETROIT Pamela J VandeVord associate professor of biomedical engineering at Wayne State University was among 85 researchers today named by President Obama as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers The award is the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers VandeVord s nomination came from the Department of Veterans Affairs and recognizes her research expertise in blast related neurotrauma including her investigation of blast induced neurotrauma in U S troops In addition to her research VandeVord is an active member of the Society for Biomaterials Biomedical Engineering Society and Society of Women Engineers and also is a health scientist at the John D Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center She has been on the Wayne State faculty since 2002 after receiving her Ph D in biomedical engineering from Wayne State University The Presidential Award embodies the high priority the Obama Administration places on producing outstanding scientists and engineers to advance the nation s goals tackle grand challenges and contribute to the American economy Ten Federal departments and agencies join together annually to nominate the most meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies missions The awards established by President Clinton in 1996 are coordinated by the Office of

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5335 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State University professor inducted to the National Academy of Kinesiology November 5 2010 Jeff Martin Ph D DETROIT Jeff Martin Ph D professor of exercise and sport science in Wayne State University s College of Education was inducted Oct 9 as a fellow in the National Academy of Kinesiology along with nine other scholars at the organization s 80th annual meeting in Williamsburg Va Fellows of the National Academy of Kinesiology are honored for their significant and sustained contributions in the field of kinesiology through scholarship and professional service Members of the academy are considered the who s who of top individuals in the fields of kinesiology and physical education To be elected as a member individuals must be nominated and ratified by the entire academy must be currently engaged in professional and or scientific work in the field and have demonstrated competence in the profession for a minimum of 10 years Martin was recently appointed editor of Sport Exercise and Performance Psychology a journal of the American Psychological Association A former professional athlete he also was recently named associate editor of the Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology During his 18 years at WSU he has published more than 85 research articles and book chapters and has concentrated his research on the psychosocial aspects of disability sport and physical activity It is a great honor to have a Wayne State faculty member elected as a fellow of the National Academy of Kinesiology said Hilary

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5327 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Williams Ph D and Daniel J Clauw M D of the University of Michigan Medical Center and Howard Schubiner M D of St John Providence Health System Fibromyalgia FM afflicts 2 to 4 percent of U S adults the majority of whom are women Notoriously difficult to treat FM is marked by widespread muscular pain and tenderness fatigue sleep problems and mood disturbance FM is a complex condition Its onset and course involve biological as well as psychological factors including beliefs emotions and behaviors Stressful life experiences which are especially prevalent in patients with FM likely contribute to the condition The five year grant will test three competing psychological behavioral interventions for fibromyalgia patient education cognitive behavior therapy CBT and a novel emotional awareness and exposure therapy The CBT approach focuses on teaching patients skills to manage their pain and decrease their disability Techniques include relaxation distraction problem solving and cognitive restructuring Although CBT is the best supported psychological intervention for FM research suggests that CBT helps only about a third of FM patients and is not as effective for patients who have unresolved stress or emotional issues Lumley and colleagues have developed and pilot tested Emotional Exposure Therapy which focuses on reducing stress by helping people confront emotions that they usually avoid This is done through techniques such as expressive writing mindfulness exercises and assertiveness training Lumley s team brings together experts in all three of the interventions being tested Lumley has focused on the relationships between stress emotion regulation and pain for the past 17 years and has developed and tested various methods to help patients reduce stress and pain Research has shown that the brain and the pain that it generates are greatly influenced by experiences and how people deal with their thoughts and emotions Lumley said

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5326 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    State University study shows teens provide socially acceptable responses even in the face of impending drug testing November 4 2010 DETROIT A recent study by researchers at Wayne State University showed that both teens and parents substantially underreported drug use even when they had knowledge that a certificate of confidentiality protected them as a participant in the research study According to Virginia Delaney Black M D M P H professor of pediatrics at Wayne State University s School of Medicine and Children s Hospital of Michigan and lead author of the study analysis of teen hair specimens were 52 times more likely to identify cocaine use when compared to self report of use Parent specimens were 6 5 times more likely to indicate cocaine use when compared to self report of use These findings confirm prior reports of adult underreporting of their own drug use while extending our understanding of teen self admitted drug use said Delaney Black Health care providers and others who need to know about teen drug use should consider additional methods of ascertainment other than self or parent report to verify teen drug use prevalence The study currently available online and slated to be published in the Nov 5 2010 issue of Pediatrics verified that teen self reported drug use numbers matched those from national anonymous surveys of black adolescents suggesting that prior studies drastically underestimated drug use particularly of cocaine and opiates in teens Concern about the potential risks of drug use admission perceived social acceptability of reporting drug use or anxiety that parents may find out about their drug use may account for teens preference to say I don t added Delaney Black In addition to Delaney Black other Wayne State researchers who co authored the study were Lisa M Chiodo Ph D John

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5319 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    along with Eric Wright of Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis Hankin and Katherine J Rosich a senior policy analyst based in Washington D C wrote the issue s executive summary The 11 articles in the issue including research from Harvard University UCLA and Indiana University Bloomington highlight the major findings of medical sociology on health and health care along with recommendations for policy reform These studies looked at the vastly changed landscape of health care in the United States said Hankin Our goal was to understand what works what doesn t work and what we can do better Several studies in the issue focused on the cost of health care in the United States Data from 2006 shows that the U S spends a substantially greater share of its gross domestic product on health care than comparable Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries without achieving better health outcomes The issue also highlights an increase in public access to health related information a trend yielding mixed results In terms of complementary and alternative medicine patients are more aware than ever of their options Hankin said However information is also acquired from direct to consumer advertising a practice that has raised some ethical concerns over the profit driven nature of pharmaceutical companies Another study done by Columbia University scholars investigates one of the oldest and most critical questions in medical sociology why the poor and other disadvantaged members of society continue to have worse health and die much younger than the more privileged members One explanation is that on average people living in poverty have fewer resources and are exposed to more environmental stressors such as dangerous neighborhoods and social isolation These factors in turn cause people to choose unhealthy behaviors such as smoking and drinking as a means to cope

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=5289 (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive