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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research

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    Original URL path: /news.php?id=5047 (2016-02-13)



  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Funding Opportunities Limited Submissions Funding Opportunities Searching for External Funding Opportunities Research Seminars Training Professional and Academic Development PAD Seminar Series Research Orientation for New Faculty Nano Wayne Grant Writing Seminars Teaching Learning Resources Centers Institutes Directory Policy on Centers Institutes Starting a Center Institute Center Institute Review Review Committees Undergraduate Research The Graduate School The Front Door for Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List Wayne State University professor named American Chemical Society Fellow August 25 2010 Dr James Rigby DETROIT James Rigby Ph D chair of the Department of Chemistry at Wayne State University and resident of Farmington Hills was named to the American Chemical Society s 2010 class of Fellows an honor bestowed upon distinguished scientists who have demonstrated outstanding accomplishments in chemistry Nominated for his exceptional contributions as a scientist and educator Rigby has had significant scientific accomplishments in organic chemistry His current research focuses on a variety of problems directed toward the total synthesis of pharmacologically active natural products Through discoveries made in Rigby s lab he and a team of researchers have created new molecules and are developing novel and powerful methods that will one day aid researchers in the pharmaceutical industry to make complex drug candidates more quickly and efficiently than otherwise would be possible Dr Rigby s leadership in the field of chemistry has helped build an outstanding chemistry department at Wayne State and has contributed to the excellence of other scientists and scientific organizations throughout the nation said Hilary Ratner vice president for research at Wayne State Because of his accomplishments as a scientist and educator he is most deserving of this prestigious recognition Rigby has been a professor at Wayne State since 1981 He received his B S in chemistry with high honors from Case

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4968 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    online Attention problems are understood to be among the more common FASD in children which can affect physical mental and behavioral development Nearly 40 000 babies are born with FASD each year and statistics show that women 34 or older are 37 percent more likely to report drinking while pregnant than their younger counterparts Chiodo and her colleagues examined 462 children born to inner city African American women who were recruited from a university antenatal clinic At the age of 7 each child took the Conners Continuous Performance Test CPT to measure his or her inattention and impulsivity and their teachers completed the Achenbach Teacher Report Form to assess attention problems in the classroom Overall the results indicated that children whose mothers were 30 years of age or older when they were born had poorer attention scores than children born to younger mothers when exposed prenatally to higher levels of alcohol The CPT in particular revealed that children born to older drinking mothers had the most difficulty sustaining attention during the test and made more mistakes compared to children born to younger drinking mothers It is very important that women are warned that with increasing maternal age fetuses may be more severely affected by alcohol exposure even when the mother s alcohol intake during pregnancy has not increased from previous pregnancies and even if prior pregnancies and older children may appear to have been unaffected said Chiodo Moreover Chiodo and her colleagues believe that understanding the influence of maternal age on the relation between prenatal alcohol and neurobehavioral outcome might assist in the development of focused primary care interventions for older drinking mothers Our findings may justify targeting older drinking mothers for particular attention in primary care settings because their fetuses are at greater risk than those of younger drinking

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4956 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Business Engagement IBio Research Home News and Announcements Return to News List WSU researcher receives more than 1 7 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue study of congenital abnormality in children August 13 2010 Tej K Mattoo M D DETROIT Tej K Mattoo M D professor and chief of Pediatric Nephrology at Wayne State University s School of Medicine and Children s Hospital of Michigan recently received more than 1 7 million from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health NIH to continue the project Primary Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children To date NIH has funded more than 4 7 million toward this research project and a separate study on Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis a disease that attacks the kidneys filtering system These new funds will allow Mattoo to continue a study started in 2005 that is examining whether long term antibiotics are necessary in children with vesicoureteral reflux VUR Mattoo is leading the study in Detroit with six additional institutions participating at research sites across the country VUR is a common congenital abnormality that is associated with recurrent urinary tract infections in children With normal urination the bladder contracts and deposits urine through the urethra In children with VUR there is an abnormal flow of urine that goes back up into the ureters and sometimes up to the kidneys This reflux exposes the kidneys to infection which can cause serious kidney damage The injury to the kidneys may result in renal scarring which may cause high blood pressure later in life or even kidney failure To prevent such damage and long term effects patients are currently treated with daily antibiotics for many years depending on the severity of their abnormality said Mattoo of Troy Mich This collaborative study will

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4939 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research

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    Original URL path: /news.php?id=4926 (2016-02-13)


  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    of Physical Review C If verified the observation may lead to answers to some of the major questions in physics such as the reason the universe is composed of matter rather than antimatter and the mechanism that generates the masses of protons and neutrons The discovery stems from Voloshin s work as a member of the BNL s STAR Collaboration which conducts experiments using the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC a 2 4 mile circumference atom smasher track at the BNL Since 2000 an international team of physicists has been conducting collisions of heavy gold and copper ions and protons as a means to investigate the basic structure and fundamental forces of matter Among the goals of RHIC is to understand conditions that occurred in the first microseconds after the Big Bang when high speed high temperature collisions determined the nature of the universe as we know it At this year s annual meeting of the American Physical Society in Washington D C the RHIC announced milestones that expand on the 2005 discovery of a hot soup of quarks fundamental elements of matter and gluons expressions of quark interactions present in the universe s first moments From an experiment that involved colliding gold ions together at nearly the speed of light researchers were able to create matter at a temperature of an estimated 4 trillion degrees Celsius about 250 000 times hotter than the center of the sun This temperature based on measurements by the PHENIX collaboration at RHIC is hot enough to melt protons and neutrons into a soup of their constituent parts conditions similar to the first microsecond after the Big Bang Using a technique he developed at Wayne State Voloshin successfully obtained the first evidence for the violation of mirror symmetry which normally characterizes the interactions of

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4894 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    Guy Stern Ph D distinguished professor emeritus at Wayne State University will receive the Geertje Potash Suhr Prize for Prose in German from the Society for Contemporary American Literature in German Stern lives in West Bloomfield Mich According to Frederick A Lubich president of the society Stern is receiving this award for his years as a prominent scholar and beloved teacher with a variety of scholarly and literary texts that draw from his vast knowledge and many experiences mixed with wit and wisdom uniquely his own Stern retired from Wayne State in 2003 and became director of the Harry and Wanda Zekelman International Institute of the Righteous at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills Mich The institute pays tribute to the men and women who throughout history have supported and rescued others even at great risk to themselves and their families Guy Stern is the sole surviving member of a Jewish family from Hildesheim Germany that was lost in the Holocaust As the oldest child and only son his parents sent him to America where he joined his uncle s family in St Louis and resumed his high school education Like other exiles from Europe in the late 1930s Stern brought with him a set of skills that would later prove invaluable to him and his new homeland Among his most deeply held goals was a desire to return to Europe to fight in World War II against the Nazis The U S Army established a special training base at Camp Ritchie in Maryland to prepare experts on Germany many of them Jewish exiles to be spies interrogators and translators Stern served as a master sergeant in the military intelligence service of the U S Army taking part in the Normandy invasion His experiences were commemorated

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4879 (2016-02-13)
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  • News and Announcements - Division of Research
    researchers and clinicians Selection and inclusion of articles provide recognition from peers of scientific merit and positive contributions to medical literature I am very pleased that our article was recognized as an important must read article by the Faculty of 1000 Medicine Dr Juratli said It is very important to us as occupational health specialists to evaluate the health and disability outcomes related to commonly performed procedures and I am honored that our scientific contribution is being recognized in the professional community Dr Juratli s study found that pain medications are involved in more than 20 percent of deaths that occur in the years after spinal fusion surgery for low back pain The risk of analgesic related death is highest among patients with degenerative disc disease especially men aged 45 to 54 according to the findings Of 2 378 workers compensation patients who underwent spinal fusion surgery in Washington between 1994 and 2001 103 died by 2004 Dr Juratli and her team analyzed the cause of death for each The rate of death within three years after surgery was 1 9 percent Deaths involving pain medications were the single most common category accounting for 21 percent of all deaths Of 22 analgesic related deaths 19 were accidental overdoses and three were suicides In all nearly 1 percent of workers who underwent spinal fusion died of analgesic poisoning Although other diseases like cancer or heart disease combined cause more deaths analgesic related deaths were the main cause of potential life years lost because younger patients were more likely to die of analgesic poisoning whereas older patients were more likely to die of other causes Workers whose back pain was primarily caused by degenerative disc disease were at elevated risk of analgesic related death nearly three times higher than those with other

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/news.php?id=4871 (2016-02-13)
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