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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    students gain the skills they need to compete in high demand fields Michigan s economy continues to benefit from the URC universities The 16 8 billion net impact in Michigan is up from 16 6 billion the previous year and 12 9 billion reported in the first report published in 2007 For every dollar the state invested in the three URC universities it saw 21 in economic benefits according to the report The report also indicates growth in research and development at the three leading research universities that comprise Michigan s URC Its 2 123 billion in R D expenditures in 2013 marks an increase of 51 percent since 2007 when the URC first began benchmarking against the other innovation clusters A rate of increase that far surpassed the average for other university clusters as well as the average for all U S institutions according to the report With a more than 50 percent increase in these areas in just eight years URC universities are becoming a force to be reckoned with in developing new technologies and innovations said URC executive director Jeff Mason The 8th Annual Economic Impact Benchmark Report demonstrates that Michigan s leading research institutions fare well in comparison with renowned research clusters including the Research Triangle and Southern California Cluster in the realm of research and development Top ranking research universities in our state have a consistent and tangible impact on our state s economy investing in jobs and research and development across the state of Michigan said President of the University of Michigan Mark Schlissel The URC also ranked first in the talent composite score a measurement of total number of degrees conferred and total number of high tech degrees The URC conferred 32 563 degrees including 2 186 medical degrees the highest number of

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=479&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    College of Liberal Arts and Sciences explored ways to formulate oil nanoemulsions to increase the solubility and stability of essential oils and consequently enhance their antimicrobial activity Much of the research on the antimicrobial efficacy of essential oils has been conducted using products made by mixing immiscible oils in water or phosphate buffered saline said Zhang However because of the hydrophobic nature of essential oils organic compounds from produce may interfere with reducing the sanitizing effect or duration of the effectiveness of these essential oils Our team set out to find a new approach to inhibit these bacteria with the use of oregano oil one of the most effective plant essential oils with antimicrobial effect Zhang and then Ph D student Kanika Bhargava currently assistant professor of human environmental sciences at the University of Central Oklahoma approached Sandro da Rocha Ph D associate professor of chemical engineering and materials science in the College of Engineering at Wayne State to explore options In our research we discovered that oregano oil was able to inhibit common foodborne bacteria such as E coli O157 Salmonella and Listeria in artificially contaminated fresh lettuce said Zhang We wanted to explore the possibility of a nanodelivery system for the oil which is an area of expertise of Dr da Rocha The team initially considered the use of solid polymeric nanoparticles for the delivery of the oil but da Rocha suggested the use of nanoemulsions My team felt the use of nanoemulsions would improve the rate of release compared to other nanoformulations and the ability of the food grade surfactant to wet the surface of the produce said da Rocha We were able to reduce L monocytogenes S Typhimurium and E coli O157 on fresh lettuce Former Ph D student Denise S Conti now at the Generics

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=478&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    result in progressive weakness and wasting of skeletal muscles and are caused by the absence of the protein dysferlin The exact function of dysferlin is still unknown although Roche s work suggests that it might be involved in maintaining the integrity of internal membrane systems like the sarco endoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubules in muscle His work has demonstrated that following high levels of mechanical loading during exercise dysferlin deficient mouse muscle undergoes extensive muscle fiber damage and inflammatory cell infiltration that accumulates over several hours and days suggesting that dysferlin might play a role in the adaptive response to exercise Roche s current Jain Foundation funded project in collaboration with Sujay Galen assistant professor clinical physical therapy program is aimed at identifying exercise programs that are capable of improving the health of dysferlin deficient muscle without causing injury Roche will be assisted by Morium Begam a research assistant and graduate of the clinical laboratory sciences program at Wayne State University I appreciate the Jain Foundation for funding this study and for supporting my research over the last seven years said Roche This research will help develop a better understanding of how healthy and dysferlin deficient skeletal muscles adapt to mechanical loading from exercise Our findings should provide patients with dysferlinopathies and their health professionals and caregivers with important information about the role specific exercises can play in slowing muscle degeneration and optimizing function Established by Ajit Jain of Berkshire Hathaway the Jain Foundation seeks to cure muscular dystrophies caused by dysferlin protein deficiency Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B LGMD2B which affects proximal muscles first and Miyoshi myopathy MM which affects distal muscles first are two clinical presentations of dysferlin protein deficiency arising from mutations in the DYSF gene Patients typically begin losing muscle strength during their late teens

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=477&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    expensive tests for a more definitive diagnosis The National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health has awarded Kavcic a two year 420 000 grant to determine if an electroencephalograph EEG plus cognitive tests on a computer or even the EEG alone could be the answer This is a community based approach said Kavcic If we want more people to be diagnosed and treated testing must be easy fast cheap and readily accepted The tests we propose can be conducted in a church basement or a senior center Older African Americans are at highest risk to develop Alzheimer s from MCI so they are the priority Kavcic along with Michigan Alzheimer s Disease Center MADC Associate Director Bruno Giordani Ph D and Edna Rose Ph D the MADC minority recruitment specialist and a nurse and social worker will recruit 200 older African Americans with no diagnosed cognitive impairment but who feel their memory may be worsening The database of volunteers compiled through the Participant Resource Pool PRP of the Healthier Black Elders Center will be vital in recruiting these people Peter Lichtenberg Ph D director of the Institute of Gerontology and the Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne State University and James Jackson Ph D director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan oversee the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research grant that funds the database The PRP list of older African Americans willing to help with research makes projects like Kavcic s possible Six years ago it would have been extremely difficult to find larger numbers of African American elders in Detroit willing to participate Lichtenberg said Through trust building outreach and education more than 1 200 volunteers now fill the database Participants will take computer based tests of cognitive function

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=476&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    professor of anatomy and cell biology in Wayne State University s School of Medicine along with colleagues at Salus University in Pennsylvania developed the breakthrough optogenetic approaches to restore vision through the use of a light sensitive protein from green algae to confer new light sensitivity in the retinas in which rod and cone photoreceptors have degenerated As one of the advantages the optogenetic approaches have the potential to treat all forms of blindness due to the death of photoceptors independent of causative gene or mutation This is a very unique and significant discovery developed right here in Detroit and it will be a major step forward in the lives of patients with vision challenges said Kresge Eye Institute Director and Department of Ophthalmology Chair Mark Juzych M D 89 This honor will help RetroSense and Dr Pan find additional funding to move the technology forward in to the clinical setting They are most deserving of this outstanding award RetroSense Therapeutics LLC licensed the patented technology and is to develop the optogenetic gene therapies designed to restore vision in patients suffering from blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa RP and advanced dry age related macular degeneration advanced dry AMD There are currently no FDA approved drugs to improve or restore vision in patients with these retinal degenerative conditions In 2014 the company was granted Orphan Drug designation for the treatment of RP by the U S Food and Drug Administration In an angel led round RetroSense Therapeutics recently secured an angel backed 7 million Series A financing which should enable the company to complete studies needed to enter clinical trials and fund early clinical development RetroSense Therapeutics received their nomination because advanced gene therapy is a difficult field for angel investors or underfunded entrepreneurs said Stephen M Lanier Ph D vice

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=475&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release

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    Original URL path: /communications/news-release.php?id=474&y=&m= (2016-02-13)


  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release
    Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric solid cancer and osteosarcoma is the most common cancerous bone tumor in children and young adults Despite significant improvements in treatment the disease returns after chemotherapy in nearly four out of 10 newly diagnosed cases of high risk neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma Recently a new treatment called antibody immunotherapy made long awaited improvements in the survival of high risk neuroblastoma patients for the first time in almost 30 years Despite advances with immunotherapy the disease still recurs in a number of high risk neuroblastoma patients even after treatment with monoclonal antibodies manufactured to specifically attack neuroblastoma Under the leadership of Dr Lum and Dr Yankelevich with the support of Jeffrey Taub M D FAAP chief of oncology on staff at the Children s Hospital of Michigan and professor of pediatrics for the Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers have begun an investigational new treatment involving antibody therapy called Bispecific Antibody Armed T Cells BATs The therapy combines cell and antibody targeted therapy to clean up remaining cancerous cells to prevent relapse after chemotherapy The new investigational research involves using the patient s own immune T Killer cells a type of immune cell that fights cancer by 1 activating and expanding these T cells outside the body to produce billions of them 2 targeting neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma by arming the T cells with the humanized bispecific antibody hu3F8 developed at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center The antibody binds to GD2 protein disialoganglioside expressed on tumors of neuroectodermal origin on neuroblastoma osteosarcomas and CD3 cluster of differentiation 3 on T cells and 3 introducing the BATs back into patients to destroy tumors and trigger immune responses against neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma tumors This approach has been tested successfully in other clinical settings including treatment for metastatic breast cancer by Dr Lum who is nationally and internationally known for pioneering the development of BATs designing clinical trials and administering BATs to patients The study using armed T cells for women with metastatic breast cancer showed an overall survival of 37 months more than twice the overall survival in most clinical trials Dr Lum said We have demonstrated successful treatment not only with breast cancer but also with multiple myeloma non Hodgkin s lymphoma and gastrointestinal cancers It is especially encouraging that all of the patients treated to date have not experienced any dose limiting side effects The study aims to establish the safe dose of armed anti GD2 T cells in children with neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma Approximately 45 children at the Children s Hospital of Michigan and Memorial Sloan Kettering will participate in the study It feels great to take the next step in this study after years of laboratory research and preparations Dr Yankelevich said It is important for young patients with high risk pediatric cancers who fail standard treatments to have additional options like our study A joint research and organizational effort of such institutions as Karmanos Memorial Sloan Kettering and the Children s Hospital of

    Original URL path: http://research.wayne.edu/communications/news-release.php?id=473&y=&m= (2016-02-13)
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  • Division of Research - Research Communications - News Release

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    Original URL path: /communications/news-release.php?id=471&y=&m= (2016-02-13)