archive-edu.com » EDU » W » WHEATON.EDU

Total: 1171

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Owen Barfield | Wheaton
    Meaning is recognized in literary fields as a definitive work Born in London Owen Barfield entered Wadham College Oxford in 1919 where he met C S Lewis who was also an undergraduate Barfield earned his B A in 1921 and began work on his B Litt which he received some time later He completed his formal studies at Oxford in 1923 and married Matilda Douie an expert in folk and courtly dance During the next few years he published a number of books including a children s story The Silver Trumpet and two books on the nature of language History in English Words and Poetic Diction In spite of this initial success he became discouraged when he was unable to find a publisher for his first novel and decided that he would be unable to support his family by means of a literary career As a result Barfield joined his father s London law firm in 1929 and earned his Bachelor of Civil Law During these years while practicing law Barfield and his wife adopted two children and fostered a third he also continued writing philosophical essays and articles and published Romanticism Comes of Age He occasionally attended meetings of the Inklings Although Barfield was a quiet and unassuming man Tolkien declared that he was the only man who can tackle C S L Lewis in a verbal exchange Barfield retired from the law in 1959 and returned to scholarship full time Over the next four decades he produced some of his most important works In particular his work Saving the Appearances contained a summary of his philosophical framework as expressed in his other writings From all of this work Barfield gained a significant reputation among academic and philosophical communities in particular in the U S where he was often

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/Owen-Barfield (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Charles Williams | Wheaton
    theological works He is best known for his spiritual novels which powerfully portray good and evil and for The Figure of Beatrice a study of Dante s Divine Comedy Williams began his formal schooling in St Albans near London and won a scholarship to University College London in 1901 but two years later left without taking a degree unable to afford to continue his education For several years he worked as a bookroom clerk then in 1908 took a job with Oxford University Press as a proofreader Williams had written poetry since adolescence and in 1912 saw his first work published the sonnet sequence The Silver Stair He married Florence Conway in 1917 had a son in 1922 and by 1924 due to his extensive knowledge of English literature was working as an editor for the Press and giving regular lectures on English literature for Adult education classes in London In the late 1920s he turned his attention to other literary forms publishing for example seven novels between the years 1931 and 1945 of which Descent into Hell 1937 is perhaps the most well known Throughout this period he also continued to write poetry most notably Taliessin through Logres 1938 the first volume of his Arthurian poetry cycle In the 1940s he found the academic recognition he had long sought when after giving a series of well received lectures at Oxford University he was awarded an Honorary Master of Arts in 1943 The same year his scholarly study of Dante and romantic theology The Figure of Beatrice was published a work which sparked Dorothy L Sayers interest in Dante The following year his novel All Hallows Eve and the second volume of his Taliessin cycle Region of the Summer Stars were published and he began work on The Figure of

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/Charles-Williams (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • C.S. Lewis | Wheaton
    Lost is considered a standard critical work Born in Belfast Northern Ireland Lewis was educated and lived most of his life in England He served and was wounded in the trenches of World War I France after which he completed his studies at Oxford University In 1925 he was elected to a Fellowship in English Language and Literature at Magdalen College Oxford where he taught for thirty years Beginning in the 1930s Lewis and some friends often gathered informally to discuss their writings and other topics This group known as The Inklings continued meeting regularly until the 1950s and included such members as J R R Tolkien Owen Barfield and Charles Williams Lewis popular success began in the 1940s with his BBC radio broadcasts which later were compiled in written format as Mere Christianity and publication of The Screwtape Letters His autobiography Surprised by Joy is an engaging description of his journey to faith In 1955 Lewis left Oxford for Magdalene College Cambridge where he was appointed Professor of Medieval and Renaissance Literature a position he held for the rest of his life It was also during the 1950s that Lewis met and married Joy Davidman Gresham an American writer whose influence can be seen in Lewis novel Till We Have Faces as well as his study on the nature of love The Four Loves Joy s battle with cancer and her subsequent death were the subject of two different films both titled Shadowlands Lewis own struggle with her loss is movingly captured in his book A Grief Observed After Joy s death in 1960 Lewis health gradually declined He died after an illness of several months in his home outside Oxford on November 22 1963 the same day President Kennedy was assassinated Lewis was just a few days short

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/CS-Lewis (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dorothy L. Sayers | Wheaton
    Wimsey novels Dorothy Leigh Sayers was also an accomplished and popular playwright religious commentator and scholar whose translation of Dante s The Divine Comedy is considered unmatched in quality and readability Sayers attended Somerville College Oxford graduating in 1915 with first class honors in modern languages but not caring for the academic life for a number of years held a variety of jobs in publishing advertising and teaching Frustrated with several relationships worried about how to support herself and unsure of her abilities she nonetheless began writing detective fiction and in 1923 her first Lord Peter Wimsey novel Whose Body was published A few years later Sayers met and married Arthur Fleming a journalist 12 years her senior and over the next decade or so Sayers wrote 14 Lord Peter Wimsey novels and short stories enjoying popular and financial success her husband often acting as assistant and unofficial press agent Sayers turned to play writing in the mid 1930s a medium which highlighted her poetic skill and dramatic abilities with Christian themes Although not her first play The Zeal of Thy House produced in 1937 was her first such commercial and critical success Sayers most well known play The Man Born to be King broadcast on the BBC in 1941 was very popular but caused a stir for its Christ who spoke modern English Sayers was sought out as a religious commentator as well and so also in 1941 The Mind of the Maker was published Sayers continued writing plays and other works throughout the 1940s and into the 1950s and began translating Dante s The Divine Comedy an interest of hers for some years as a result of reading Charles Williams The Figure of Beatrice Her translations of Dante were to be her greatest accomplishment though she died in

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/Dorothy-L-Sayers (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • George MacDonald | Wheaton
    Princess and Curdie and his fantasies for adults Phantastes and Lilith One of only a few writers of his time to write symbolic fiction his romantic vision of spiritual realites has greatly influenced such writers as W H Auden G K Chesterton and C S Lewis A native of Scotland MacDonald attended the University of Aberdeen but although receiving a master s degree in chemistry and physics in 1845 was uncertain about what to do with his life Desiring to bring others to the Christian faith and having a gift of preaching he attended Highbury College London graduating in 1850 with a divinity degree The following year he assumed the pastorate of a Congregationalist Church in Arundel near the southern coast of England and also married Louisa Powell with whom he would eventually have eleven children Within two years his congregation asked him to leave for theological reasons particularly his insistence on the duty of obedience to the principles of Christian living In poor health struggling to support his growing family and searching for a means to communicate his beliefs MacDonald turned to writing In 1858 his long poem Within and Without was published and well received helping to establish MacDonald s reputation Three years later Phantastes was published to literary acclaim but little public enthusiasm MacDonald took up lecturing to support his family and about 1860 became Professor of English Literature at Bedford College London a post he held for seven years In 1863 his novel David Elginbrod was published and proved very popular For the next forty years MacDonald lectured and wrote realistic novels fantasy children s stories and poetry enjoying popular and financial success MacDonald produced some of his best works during the last 15 years of his life including There and Back and Lilith MacDonald died

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/George-MacDonald (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • G.K. Chesterton | Wheaton
    genius delighting in paradox and a gift for religious argument he published nearly 100 books and over 4 000 newspaper columns and essays While attending art school in London in the mid 1890s when he was about twenty Chesterton realized his artistic limitations and determined to pursue journalism A few years later he was writing columns regularly for several newspapers including the Daily News and the Illustrated London News and by 1902 was widely recognized for his abilities as a political and social critic and as a writer in general During the first decade of the 20th century Chesterton s voluminous written output only increased and included his first novel The Napoleon of Notting Hill and his classic work on the basics of Christian belief Orthodoxy Chesterton also met George Bernard Shaw and Hillaire Belloc during this period men with whom he worked and debated for most of the rest of his life He took over editorship of the The New Witness in the 1910s and renamed it G K s Weekly using it as another vehicle for his articles and essays and to introduce his Father Brown detective stories Chesterton and his wife Frances visited the U S twice between 1920 and 1930 both times stopping in Chicago His book What I Saw in America 1922 contains his thoughts about his 1921 trip Chesterton continued writing essays and articles among them The Everlasting Man and The Thing Why I Am a Catholic The former work helped convince C S Lewis of the sensibleness of Christianity A large man in later life Chesterton was often seen on London s streets walking to and from his office sporting a cape swordstick crumpled hat and tiny glasses talking with friends and colleagues In the early 1930s Chesterton began a series of popular

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/GK-Chesterton (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • J.R.R. Tolkien | Wheaton
    of the Rings works that have enormously shaped modern fantasy literature In academic circles Tolkien is recognized for his contributions to the study of language in literature In particular his lecture Beowulf the Monsters and the Critics published in 1936 is a major critical work about that important Old English poem His other writings include poems and short stories Born in South Africa and a few years later taken to England for his health Tolkien entered Exeter College Oxford in 1911 and in 1915 took a First in English Language and Literature In 1916 after a period of forced separation of several years Tolkien married Edith Bratt with whom he eventually had four children Tolkien served with the Lancashire Fusiliers from 1915 18 fought in the Battle of the Somme and contracting an illness returned to England to recover While recovering he began what was to be his life long literary work The Silmarillion Tolkien became Reader in English Language at the University of Leeds in 1920 Professor of English Language at Leeds in 1924 and Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo Saxon at Oxford in 1925 During these years he worked with E V Gordon on a critical edition of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and continued work on The Silmarillion Early in the 1930s he began writing The Hobbit which was published in 1937 That same year at the suggestion of his publisher he began work on The Lord of the Rings the first two volumes being published in 1954 and the third in 1955 In 1945 Tolkien was awarded the Merton Professor of English Language and Literature at Oxford a position he held until his retirement in 1959 After his retirement Tolkien wrote Smith of Wootton Major Tree and Leaf and The Adventures of Tom Bombadil

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/Authors/JRR-Tolkien (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive

  • News & Events | Wheaton
    18 March 10 at the Wade Center Grief is something that must be traveled to be truly understood Join Reverend Jay Moses of Hope Presbyterian Church Wheaton as we reflect on C S Lewis s book A Grief Observed Lewis through his writing after the death of his beloved wife Joy gave a testament to the human soul s path through grief Free and open to the public Thursdays 3 30 4 30 pm Follow this link to RSVP 2015 2016 Hansen Lectures on J R R Tolkien Philip G Ryken President of Wheaton College View and learn more about Dr Ryken s 2015 2016 lecture series titled The Messiah Comes to Middle earth Images of Christ s Threefold Office in The Lord of the Rings The final lecture The Coronation of Aragorn Son of Arathorn will take place on March 31 2016 More Reading at the Wade January 9 April 9 Join us for a lively discussion on Wade authors This session the group will be reading Lilith by George MacDonald and The Greater Trumps by Charles Williams Online sign up is required Free and open to the public Follo w this Link to RSVP Syllabus College Bookstore Coupon More Information on the Group Display on The Hobbit Wade Center Museum The Wade Center celebrates The Hobbit with a large scale map charting the journey of Bilbo Baggins Watch out for Smaug the Dragon See our Museum page for more details More Video on The Hobbit and the Wade Center Learn more about the Wade Center and J R R Tolkien s book The Hobbit More Gifts and Books at the Wade Gift Store Special event coming up Looking for something new for your personal bookshelves Consider the Wade Center gift store Items for sale include DVD study guides

    Original URL path: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/News-and-Events (2016-02-17)
    Open archived version from archive