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  • Campus Calendar | Whittier College
    Admission Aid First Year Students International Students Transfer Students Graduate Students Get to Know Us Apply for Admission Financial Aid Costs Admitted Students Contact Us Campus Life Campus Life Home Getting Involved Housing Food Health Exercise Sustainability Student Support First Year at Whittier News Events Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information Athletics Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni You are here Home Campus Calendar Campus Calendar Campus Calendar Sort Calendar All Events Academic Dates Admission Events Annual Events Arts Culture Conferences Symposia Speakers Lectures Special Events Student Life Saturday January 30 2016 Prev Next Any Unlisted Student Life Annual Events Admission Events Arts Culture Conferences Symposia Special Events Speakers Lectures Academic Dates View Calendar by Day Week Month Year All day Before 1 am 1 am 2 am 3 am 4 am 5 am 6 am 7 am 8 am 9 am 10 am 11 am 12

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/calendar/day/2016-01-30 (2016-01-26)
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  • End Instruction | Whittier College
    Campus Leadership Assessment Accreditation Visit Whittier Shannon Center for the Performing Arts Greenleaf Gallery Broadoaks School School Song Alma Mater Admission Aid First Year Students International Students Transfer Students Graduate Students Get to Know Us Apply for Admission Financial Aid Costs Admitted Students Contact Us Campus Life Campus Life Home Getting Involved Housing Food Health Exercise Sustainability Student Support First Year at Whittier News Events Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information Athletics Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni In This Section News Events Mobile Menu Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information You are here Home JanTerm Ends JanTerm Ends On 18 Jan 2016 By jdominguez 0 Comments Date and Time Monday January 25 2016 8 00am Location Whittier College Campus Contact Registrar s Office 562 907 4241 View Campus Calendar News Events Office of Communications News Releases Campus

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/event/end-instruction (2016-01-26)
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  • Men's Basketball @ Caltech | Whittier College
    Whittier Shannon Center for the Performing Arts Greenleaf Gallery Broadoaks School School Song Alma Mater Admission Aid First Year Students International Students Transfer Students Graduate Students Get to Know Us Apply for Admission Financial Aid Costs Admitted Students Contact Us Campus Life Campus Life Home Getting Involved Housing Food Health Exercise Sustainability Student Support First Year at Whittier News Events Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information Athletics Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni In This Section News Events Mobile Menu Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information You are here Home Men s Basketball Caltech Men s Basketball Caltech On 12 Oct 2015 By mpistolesi 0 Comments Date and Time Wednesday January 27 2016 7 30pm Location Braun Athletic Center 1200 E California Blvd Pasadena CA 91125 Contact Athletics Department 562 907 4271 View Campus Calendar News Events Office

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/event/mens-basketball-caltech (2016-01-26)
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  • Whittier College Blood Drive | Whittier College
    Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni In This Section News Events Mobile Menu Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information You are here Home Whittier College Blood Drive Whittier College Blood Drive On 22 Jan 2016 By ssobers 0 Comments Date and Time Thursday January 28 2016 8 00am to 4 00pm Location A J Villalobos Hall Event Description Please help save a life Give blood at Whittier College s Blood Drive Make your LIFESAVING appointment online Sponsor Code WCLEAP Download the FREE application Available on the App Store or Google Play RAPIDPASS The American Red Cross is excited to introduce RapidPass a new tool that allows donors to help save lives in less time This tool allows you to start the blood donation process from the comfort of your home or office and saves you time at the donation site 4 Steps to your RapidPass Introduction Read

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/event/whittier-college-blood-drive (2016-01-26)
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  • Eric Buss | Whittier College
    Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information Athletics Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni In This Section News Events Mobile Menu Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information You are here Home Eric Buss Eric Buss On 8 Jan 2016 By iferguson 0 Comments Date and Time Friday January 29 2016 7 30pm Location Ruth B Shannon Center for the Performing Arts Event Description Free admission but tickets are required Eric Buss was born in Tucson Arizona When he was born the doctors all laughed at him That laughter gave Eric a rush and at the age of seven seconds he knew he wanted to make people laugh when he grew up Later at the ripe age of 8 he learned how to tinker in his dad s workshop Then at age 16 he started learning magic tricks When he successfully merged

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/event/eric-buss (2016-01-26)
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  • Men's Basketball vs Pomona-Pitzer | Whittier College
    Center for the Performing Arts Greenleaf Gallery Broadoaks School School Song Alma Mater Admission Aid First Year Students International Students Transfer Students Graduate Students Get to Know Us Apply for Admission Financial Aid Costs Admitted Students Contact Us Campus Life Campus Life Home Getting Involved Housing Food Health Exercise Sustainability Student Support First Year at Whittier News Events Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information Athletics Athletics Alumni Get Involved Our Alumni Poet Awards Benefits Services Connect Whittier Weekend Information For Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Information for Students Alumni Parents Families Friends Neighbors Faculty Staff Apply Visit Search form Search Calendar Directory Campus Life Admission About Academics News Events Athletics Giving Alumni In This Section News Events Mobile Menu Office of Communications News Releases Campus Events Calendar The Rock For the Media Emergency Information You are here Home Men s Basketball vs Pomona Pitzer Men s Basketball vs Pomona Pitzer On 12 Oct 2015 By mpistolesi 0 Comments Date and Time Saturday January 30 2016 2 00pm Location Graham Athletics Center 13847 Earlham Drive Whittier CA 90602 Contact Athletics Department 562 907 4271 View Campus Calendar News Events

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/event/mens-basketball-vs-pomona-pitzer (2016-01-26)
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  • Goals & Objectives | Whittier College
    developmental in nature In the first semester the primary purpose of the link is for each student to develop intellectual and social relationships with a defined set of peers through common enrollment in two classes The spring semester link continues these purposes but intensifies the intellectual dimension This link consists of two courses with some level of thematic connection designed to promote awareness and understanding of relationships across disciplines Examining a theme from the standpoint of two different disciplines introduces the intellectually rich notion of multiple perspectives a concept important to the collaborative community that defines Whittier College Social well being and intellectual engagement and growth are enhanced by giving each student places of belonging within the campus community Every first year student should have such a place within the academic and intellectual community that is Whittier College Linked courses contribute to this purpose Objectives To increase student engagement in the community as a whole academic student life co curricular activities To improve student ability in using signs and symbols specifically writing skills To initiate student ability to make connections across disciplines demonstrating a beginning understanding of the convergence and divergence of knowledge Outcomes Increased retention fall and spring semesters Students positive report of engagement in the community fall and spring semesters Students demonstration of improved writing skills fall semester Students demonstration of initial ability to make connections across disciplines and to understand the convergence and divergence of knowledge spring semester Guidelines These linked sets of courses are called Community I and consist of two courses of 3 or more credits All Community courses should be suitable for freshmen typically at the introductory level The following sets of guidelines specify the parameters within which each link should be formed Community I fall Key Objective To develop community in a cohort of fifteen students through co enrollment in two classes while developing the writing skills necessary for success in college Guidelines for Community I Link One of the two associated courses will be INTD 100 The second course can be any introductory course suitable for entering freshmen The course with which INTD 100 is linked may include students not in the link Links may be but do not have to be inter divisional Links may be but do not have to be inter departmental Conceivably both courses in this link could be taught by the same person In rare instances students may transfer during the add drop period from one set of linked courses to another but they must remain enrolled in a linked set Guidelines for INTD 100 Courses While each seminar will require at least three formal essays the maximum number will be at the discretion of the instructor The number of assignments is generally less important than developing the habit of thorough and careful revision The formal essays should be prompted by detailed descriptions of the writing assignment and should include extensive revision Essays and exercises should be designed to improve critical reading and thinking Exercises will focus on such skills as summarizing and paraphrasing documenting sources and using strategies of analysis argument description and narration Students will learn to correct surface errors through assigned exercises Students will learn to think of writing as a process including multiple revisions of writing assignments Revision depends upon explanatory feed back from the instructor Although peer review is valuable it is not a substitute for detailed written guidelines and feed back from the instructor Students will write a final paper of substantial length approximately six to eight pages involving analysis synthesis and revision Communication 9 credits Goal Students should develop an understanding of and competency in the use of signs and symbols to construct create perceive and communicate meaning II Quantitative Literacy 3 credits Writing Intensive Course 3 credits Creative and Performing Arts 2 credits Senior Presentation 1 credit Communication I Quantitative Literacy Philosophy The Communication I requirement should not be confused with an explicit Mathematics requirement According to the National Council on Education quantitative literacy also known as numeracy is not so much about understanding abstract concepts as about applying elementary tools in sophisticated settings N umeracy and mathematics should be complementary aspects of the school curriculum Mathematics thrived as a discipline and as a school subject because it was and still is the tool par excellence for comprehending ideas of the scientific age Numeracy will thrive similarly because it is the natural tool for comprehending information in the computer age As variables and equations created the mathematical language of science so digital data are creating a new language of information technology Numeracy embodies the capacity to communicate in this new language Lynn Arthur Steen ed Mathematics and Democracy The Case for Quantitative Literacy National Council on Education and the Disciplines http www maa org ql mathanddemocracy html The focus of the Communication I requirement is on the application of quantitative skills to diverse fields of inquiry at the college level Any course that satisfies this requirement should give the student an opportunity to use numerical tools to a analyze problems and or situations and b communicate the results of that analysis Whenever possible students should have the opportunity to satisfy this requirement by applying their quantitative skills in a course related to their academic interests Objectives and Outcomes According to a report by a Mathematics Association of America committee The level of sophistication and maturity of thinking expected of a college student should extend to a capability for quantitative reasoning which is commensurate with the college experience College students should be expected to go beyond routine problem solving to handle problem situations of greater complexity and diversity and to connect ideas and procedures more readily with other topics both within and outside mathematics Quantitative Reasoning for College Graduates Report of an MAA Committee http www maa org past ql ql toc html The MAA committee has made a list of desirable quantitative skills for college graduates a quantitatively literate college graduate should be able to Interpret mathematical models such as formulas graphs tables and schematics and draw inferences from them Represent mathematical information symbolically visually numerically and verbally Use arithmetical algebraic geometric and statistical methods to solve problems Estimate and check answers to mathematical problems in order to determine reasonableness identify alternatives and select optimal results Recognize that mathematical and statistical methods have some limitations Guidelines Communication I courses should offer quantitative reasoning skills in one or more disciplinary context They should emphasize the importance of the quantitative subject matter to at least one other discipline and should develop students written and oral communication skills in the language of mathematics A course qualifies as a Communication I course if the quantitative reasoning and mathematical methodologies are integral to the course content and are offered in a context that is natural to the subject throughout the semester The integrated part of the course which contains the math incorporated within the subject matter must exceed two thirds of the material covered A course that is somewhat quantitative cannot become a Communication I course simply by increasing the number of quantitative assignments The course syllabus for all Communication I courses should outline specific outcomes that students will achieve in quantitative literacy after taking the course The course is intended to improve students quantitative skills materially beyond the basic level of mathematical proficiency expected of all high school students To promote active and interactive student learning and to facilitate the use of computers and other technology in the classroom the course should enroll no more than thirty students The course must be a college level experience in the application of quantitative skills not a remedial math experience This implies that more than mere computation and data crunching will be expected of students Students must be required to think about the meaning of numerical results and to draw conclusions from them They must learn to discern implications inherent in the results Implicit in all of the above is the assumption that students already have achieved a certain level of mathematical proficiency basic arithmetic algebra geometry and perhaps statistics Students will demonstrate this proficiency by taking a placement exam at the start of the semester they enter the college Students who are not prepared for the level of work expected in Communications I courses will be required to take a preparatory course as a pre requisite to any Communications I offering Examples of such a course include Math 74 Transition to College Mathematics and Math 76 College Algebra Communication II Writing Intensive Course Goal Students should develop an understanding of and competency in the use of signs and symbols to construct create perceive and communicate meaning II Guidelines Courses satisfying the Communication II requirement must be taken after the successful completion of INTD 100 and should be completed by the end of the first semester of the sophomore year Therefore courses meeting this requirement should be lower division The Communication II course may be taken within or outside the major and may simultaneously satisfy other liberal education requirements In order to accomplish the desired goal of continuing the emphasis on writing instruction through a second semester course courses satisfying the Communication II requirement must include several papers at least one of which is rewritten after substantial evaluation by the instructor In order to continue to emphasize the importance of applying information and interpretations gleaned from research or textual analysis at least one longer paper should be assigned Rather than simply cataloguing information research papers should emphasize using information and interpretations in presenting a case or argument those emphasizing textual analysis should involve some degree of comparison analysis or synthesis of ideas presented in the various sources To allow the instructor time for careful evaluation and emphasis on structured rewriting of papers enrollment in courses satisfying the Communication II requirement should not exceed twenty five students Communication III Creative Arts Goal Students should develop an understanding of and competency in the use of signs and symbols to construct create perceive and communicate meaning II Philosophy The creative arts are fundamental avenues of expression and modes of communication Music theater visual art and creative writing abound in virtually all cultures revealing fashion sensibilities and substantive concerns and communicate across cultural divides Artworks reflect the creator s insights into questions problems and ideas Motivation to create comes from many sources addressing spatial and structural challenges telling a story communicating a social political or commercial message revealing perceptions of self the human condition or the depths of the psyche We believe that creative experience in one or more of the arts offered at Whittier is enriching and essential This general sector of coursework provides students with challenges and opportunities similar to those encountered in other types of intellectual pursuits researching and analyzing composing revising refining and presenting hypothesizing and testing However a number of qualities distinguish creative endeavors from most other components of the curriculum They depend significantly upon judgments sometimes in the absence of rules They foster awareness that all problems can be addressed by many solutions They have flexible aims allowing us to respond to surprises which in turn often lead to unexpected destinations Often as in visual art and music they allow thinking and expression not confined by the limits imposed by words and numbers and They help people discover the strong emotional dimension to creating through the creative process and enjoyment of creative work we discover and reinforce our ability to feel The importance of creativity is reflected in Albert Einstein s comment that creativity is more important than knowledge Communication III develops students creative capacities which can at the same time improve their thinking skills and comprehension of their surroundings leading to an enriched life Through creative engagement a student becomes a more complete person more alive Outcomes Skill development technical accomplishment in some mode of creative work Artistic application of acquired skills through the successful creation of an artistic product Students will have created one or more creative works whether alone or collaboratively Successful communication through creative expression Students will have presented work to an audience which can include classmates and has received critical feedback on that work Enhanced appreciation of the creative process If not already well acquainted with creative processes students will begin to understand that anyone can be creative and that creative activities can be rewarding and enriching to all people Guidelines The Communications III requirement can be fulfilled by taking two one credit courses or one two three credit course from the approved list Creative writing studio art music and theater courses that focus upon design composition or performance can be designated Communications III courses Communication IV Senior Presentation Goals Students should develop an understanding of and competency in the use of signs and symbols to construct create perceive and communicate meaning II Students should develop breadth defined as familiarity with essential concepts in major fields and depth defined as knowledge of at least one field usually achieved in the major V Philosophy The Senior Presentation is intended as the capstone of the Liberal Education Program which emphasizes the importance of communication skills as well as the importance of applying acquired knowledge It should also showcase the accomplishments of Whittier College graduates on and in some cases off campus while providing an inspiring example for younger students Objective To communicate to the campus community the results of a project or activity that demonstrates the ability to translate skills and knowledge to domains and problems new to the student presenter Outcomes Students will demonstrate advanced communication skills using one or more modes of presentation Students will demonstrate ability to apply general skills and knowledge to new domains and problems Students will inspire their younger peers by showcasing their accomplishments Guidelines The presentation may take the form of a poster an oral presentation a concert an art exhibit a dramatic presentation a reading of poems or short stories a video a multi media web page or some other form using English or the target language of a major or minor in another modern language Contributions by individual students to a group presentation are allowed but each student s participation must be substantial Ideally the presentation will be related to the student s Paper in the Major It may be based on a class a research project a creative project an internship a service learning project a study abroad experience or another educational activity The sponsor will generally be a professor who is already working with the student on a project or activity It could be the instructor of a class the student s advisor or another professor approved by the student s department chair Any disagreements about the sponsor will be resolved by the Liberal Education Committee The Senior Presentation may be prepared as part of any of the following a a senior seminar or other course in which students write their Paper in the Major in which case the presentation could be worth more than one credit b another course offered by the department which could be a one credit course designed specifically for preparing the Senior Presentation CR NC or for a letter grade c INTD 499 Senior Presentation one credit of independent study which could be taken with any faculty member approved by the department chair CR NC Senior Presentations may be made in departmental venues at professional conferences at undergraduate research conferences or during a special presentation period each semester When possible posters and exhibits will be displayed more than one day with a designated time when the students are available to answer questions about their work The organization and scheduling of Senior Presentations will be coordinated by the Liberal Education Committee with support from staff appointed by the Dean of Faculty The audience for Senior Presentations is not just an individual class but the wider campus community They will be publicized on campus through flyers the campus newspaper press releases to local newspapers the college website admissions materials alumni publications and other appropriate venues All students should be encouraged to attend Senior Presentations in order to be empowered and inspired by their senior peers to become more aware of creative possibilities and to see the culmination of the Liberal Education program To this end attendance might be a required assignment in First Year Linked courses So that the expenses will not reduce funding for other needs in the college budget the Dean of the Faculty and the Advancement Office will seek grants and special endowment funds to support Senior Presentation Days Cultural Perspectives 12 credits One Course from four of the following seven areas African Asian Latin American North American European Cross Cultural Foreign Languages Goals Students should develop the capacity to entertain multiple perspectives and interpretations III Students should develop an understanding of culture and of the connections between themselves and others in relation to physical historical social and global contexts IV Philosophy Cultural Perspectives courses introduce students to the complexity and diversity of both contemporary and historical human culture whether material social or intellectual Material culture might for example include the study of physical or visual artifacts Social culture might be understood through the study of institutions art religion theater ritual or language And intellectual culture might include literary philosophical religious and artistic expressions The categories African Asian European Latin American North American and Cross Cultural are broadly definable these terms are synoptic and multivalent rather than discrete and unitary geographic categories But the Cultural Perspectives requirement should remove students from that which comprises their known world and should inspire them to explore the terra incognita both of their own culture and that of other cultures whether the distance is that of time or space or both The purpose of this journey is to help students define and understand their world through contradistinction Objectives Outcomes In the aggregate four courses of the total seven categories students should be exposed to a variety of human cultures whether material social or intellectual be exposed to contemporary

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/academics/goals (2016-01-26)
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  • Curriculum in Content | Whittier College
    sense of community students writing seminar will also correspond to their mentor groups in most cases students writing instructor will be their mentor and their peer mentor will be their OWL Orientation Week Leader Community in Co curricular Life Whittier College s co curricular programs including Residential Life Faculty Masters Program the Cultural Center College athletics and various clubs and organizations are designed to foster community by offering a variety of opportunities for students to meet and interact with others students faculty and staff in significant ways Within the larger community that is Whittier College students experience and practice community in a variety of settings Residence halls The C I the Spot and Club 88 Faculty Masters houses The Cultural Center Lounges and scholars centers in Wardman Hall and in most other academic buildings Study spaces in the College Library and the Center for Advisement and Academic Success In the especially close relationships Whittier students typically form with faculty and staff Not infrequently in faculty homes and on field trips and other explorations with faculty beyond the classroom In offices such as the Counseling Center and Career Services In student government On athletic teams intramural and extramural On the staff of the Quaker Campus as a member of a musical ensemble etc In clubs and organizations allowing students to meet others sharing their interests faith or values 2 Communication Communication Sharing perceptions feelings ideas beliefs and values with others What is communication The act of sharing with others what one has perceived has felt believes and or has come to know through the use of variety of symbol systems numerical verbal visual musical etc Communication in the Curriculum three to four courses nine credits Quantitative Literacy 3 credits Writing Intensive Course 3 credits to be taken after the College Writing Seminar Creative and Performing Arts 2 credits Senior Presentation 1 credit Communication in Co curricular Life The empathy essential to building and sustaining any community from one s family of origin to a couple to a college to a nation depends not coincidentally on Whittier s other three C s communication cultural perspective and the ability to make connections Whittier College s co curricular programs including Residential Life Faculty Masters Program the Cultural Center College athletics and various clubs and organizations are designed to foster communication within the community Among students living on campus Between students living on campus and those living off campus Among students with similar goals interests or values Among students who might not otherwise find ways to communicate e g students from differing national ethnic cultural religious economic or educational backgrounds with differing values political or religious views sexual orientation Between students and faculty students and staff This communication is fostered through a wide variety of programs Lectures by distinguished speakers in a variety of fields Discussions hosted by various organizations Clubs that are open to the student body as a whole At Whittier for example students of any ethnicity can join BSU everyone is welcome

    Original URL path: http://www.whittier.edu/academics/curriculum (2016-01-26)
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