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  • Home | UW-Madison Astronomy
    display at Space Place Jul 17 2012 Continue Reading Venus Transit at Washburn Space Place Hundreds of people gathered at UW Madison s historic Washburn Observatory and at the Astronomy Department s Space Place Tuesday night to view the transit of Venus Jun 07 2012 Continue Reading Washburn Observer The spring 2012 issue of the department newsletter is now available online May 15 2012 Continue Reading View All News Events High Resolution X ray Spectroscopy a New Window on the Universe Professor Dan McCammon UW Madison Physics Department Space Place Nov 13 2012 Details The Gaseous Environments of High Redshift Star Forming Galaxies Gwen Rudie Caltech Colloquium Nov 15 2012 Details Washburn Public Observing Washburn Nov 21 2012 Details The Cosmological Challenges of Dwarf Galaxies Julio Navarro University of Victoria Special Event Nov 27 2012 Details Revealing the origins and environments of Mg II absorbers with the SDSS and 3D HST Britt Lundgren UW Madison Colloquium Nov 29 2012 Details H alpha Dots A Catalog of Faint Emission line Objects Discovered in Narrowband Images Jessica Kellar Dartmouth College Lunch Talk Dec 03 2012 Details Washburn Public Observing Washburn Dec 05 2012 Details Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Cosmic Rays in Clusters of Galaxies Samuel Skillman University of Colorado Colloquium Dec 06 2012 Details View All Events See the Stars Free public observing on campus at Washburn Observatory is hosted by an astronomer every 1 2 weeks throughout the year See Dates Details Quick Links Pages of Interest Recent Publications UW Space Place Outreach Center Stay in Touch Contact Us Sign Up for the Newsletter Help us Grow About Us General Information Contact Us Department History Historical Images Our People Directory Faculty Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science Results Galactic Structure GALFA GLIMPSE GLIMPSE360 Extragalactic Astronomy Cosmology Local Universe Star Forming Galaxies Galaxy Kinematics AGN Feedback Distant Universe Cosmic Evolution Galactic Winds Young Galaxies Galaxy Mergers High Energy Astrophysics Compact Objects AGN Feedback Microquasar Feedback Multi Phase Fluids Visualization Interacting Binaries White Dwarf Atmospheres X ray Binary Populations Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic Winds Astrophysical Dynamos Plasma and Turbulence Studies Rapid Reconnection Making Starbirth Easier Solar Tevatron Anomalous Cosmic Rays ISM Turbulence Massive Stars Observational Astronomy WOCS Interacting Binaries WHAM Local Universe Galaxy Kinematics Distant Universe Ice Cube GALFA Instrumentation Robert Stobie Spectrograph RSS NIR Integral Field Spectroscopy Star Tracker 5000 WHAM Astrophysics in Physics Center for Magnetic Self Organization Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Observational Cosmology Theoretical Cosmology Research Observatories Southern African Large Telescope WIYN 3 5m Telescope Hydra

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/ (2012-11-14)
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  • Course Info | UW-Madison Astronomy
    Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science Results Galactic Structure GALFA GLIMPSE GLIMPSE360 Extragalactic Astronomy Cosmology Local Universe Star Forming Galaxies Galaxy Kinematics AGN Feedback Distant Universe Cosmic Evolution Galactic Winds Young Galaxies Galaxy Mergers High Energy Astrophysics Compact Objects AGN Feedback Microquasar Feedback Multi Phase Fluids Visualization Interacting Binaries White Dwarf Atmospheres X ray Binary Populations Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic Winds Astrophysical Dynamos Plasma and Turbulence Studies Rapid Reconnection Making Starbirth Easier Solar Tevatron Anomalous Cosmic Rays ISM Turbulence Massive Stars Observational Astronomy WOCS Interacting Binaries WHAM Local Universe Galaxy Kinematics Distant Universe Ice Cube GALFA Instrumentation Robert Stobie Spectrograph RSS NIR Integral Field Spectroscopy Star Tracker 5000 WHAM Astrophysics in Physics Center for Magnetic Self Organization Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Observational Cosmology Theoretical Cosmology Research Observatories Southern African Large Telescope WIYN 3 5m Telescope Hydra WHIRC SparsePak WIYN 3 5 Bench Spectrograph ODI WIYN 0 9m Telescope Mosaic S2KB camera Pine Bluff Obervatory Research Facilities Computing Resources Instrumentation Labs Woodman Astronomical Library Machine and Electronics Shops Electronics Shop Instrumentation and Precision Machining General Machining Shop The Astronomical Journal Research Centers Collaborations GLIMPSE CMSO GALFA SKA Pathfinders Ice Cube Publications Item News Events News Events Colloquia Featured Science Newsletter Undergrads Astronomy Physics Major Courses Fall 2012 Courses Spring 2013 Courses Course Descriptions UW Course Schedule UW Madison

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/undergrads/courses/course-info/ (2012-11-14)
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  • Directory | UW-Madison Astronomy
    this email address Ph 608 262 8696 Office 6515 Sterling Hall Kriewald Kay Senior Outreach Specialist Space Place JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 9251 Office 2514 Sterling Hall Kundert Alisha Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 4558 Sterling Hall Profile Page Back to top L Lattis Jim Director Space Place JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 263 0360 Office 2514 Sterling Hall Lazarian Alex Professor JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 1715 Office 6289 Chamberlin Hall Research Interests MHD Theory Reconnection Dynamo Theory Interstellar Dust Alignment Microwave Emission Interstellar Turbulence Statistical Studies Circumstellar Regions and Comets Polarization Molecular Clouds Dynamics Profile Page Personal Website Lee Hye Seung Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 770 4004 Office 6511E Sterling Hall Research Interests Astrophysical MHD turbulence and dynamo in ISM cosmic ray acceleration magnetic field by dust alignment and their polarization I m also interested in magnetic reconnection in astrophysical system Profile Page Lee Min Young Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 4520 Sterling Hall Research Interests ISM in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies Formation and evolution of molecular clouds Star formation Profile Page Leiner Emily Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 5510 Sterling Hall Profile Page Lundgren Britt NSF Astronomy Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3765 Office 5507c Sterling Hall Research Interests I am primarily interested in how galaxies have evolved throughout the history of the Universe both in terms of their luminous stellar properties as well as their more elusive gas dust and dark matter content I use a combination of observations from deep galaxy surveys and the spectra of distant quasars to shed light on these questions Profile Page Back to top M Makuluni Anita Managing Editor The Astronomical Journal JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 265 6005 Office 2558 Sterling Hall Mao Sui Ann NRAO Jansky Postdoctoral Fellow JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3768 Office 4554 Sterlin Hall Profile Page Mathieu Robert Professor JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3767 Office 6506 Sterling Hall Research Interests Structure kinematics and dynamics of star clusters and star forming regions stellar binary populations blue stragglers and other objects at the interface of stellar evolution and stellar dynamics formation of binary stars stellar angular momentum evolution Profile Page Meade Marilyn Research Scientist JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 263 4678 Office 4536 Sterling Hall Profile Page Personal Website Michalski Don Technical Staff JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 263 4685 Office 4521 Sterling Hall Profile Page Milliman Katelyn Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 6511E Sterling Hall Research Interests Studying the binary populations of open clusters Profile Page Morsony Brian NSF Astronomy Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 6777 Office 4546 Sterling Hall Profile Page Mosby Greg Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 6511E Sterling Hall Research Interests My research interests include but most certainly not limited to star formation galaxy evolution and instrumentation to advance science I also dabble in applied mathematics now and then for sport My current research focuses on using quasars and their host galaxies to test paradigms of galaxy evolution Profile Page Murray Claire Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 6283B Chamberlin Hall Research Interests My research interests include star formation the interstellar medium and gas flows in galaxies Profile Page Back to top N Nielsen Danielle Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 3516 Sterling Hall Profile Page Personal Website Nordsieck Kenneth Emeritus JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 1163 Office 5507A Sterling Hall Research Interests Instrumental observational and analytical applications of astronomical polarimetry optical studies of stellar envelopes and the polarization that arises from scattering by interstellar dust Profile Page Personal Website Normington Angela Administrative Staff JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 2965 Office 2548 Sterling Hall Back to top O Orio Marina Senior scientist visiting from INAF Italian National Institute of Astrophysics Padova Observatory JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 9387 Office 6510 Sterling Research Interests Interacting binaries novae evolution of the type Ia supernovae progenitors close binaries populations in nearby galaxies Optical UV and X ray observations X ray gratings spectra Profile Page Back to top P Percival Jeff Senior Research Scientist JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 8686 Office 5518 Sterling Hall Profile Page Pittman Sharon Graduate and Undergraduate Coordinator JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3775 Office 2554 Sterling Hall Back to top R Reynolds Ron Emeritus JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 262 1249 Office 3504 Sterling Hall Profile Page Ryon Jenna Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3771 Office 3511B Sterling Hall Research Interests I m interested in extragalactic astronomy specifically using star clusters to probe galaxy evolution Profile Page Back to top S Sanford Barbara Development Specialist JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 890 3987 Office 2510 Sterling Hall Savage Blair Emeritus JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph 608 265 8786 Office 3508 Sterling Hall Profile Page Schechtman Rook Andrew Graduate Student JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address Ph Office 6511C Sterling Hall Research Interests I am chiefly interested in the stellar

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/our-people/directory/ (2012-11-14)
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  • Contact Us | UW-Madison Astronomy
    Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic Winds Astrophysical Dynamos Plasma and Turbulence Studies Rapid Reconnection Making Starbirth Easier Solar Tevatron Anomalous Cosmic Rays ISM Turbulence Massive Stars Observational Astronomy WOCS Interacting Binaries WHAM Local Universe Galaxy Kinematics Distant Universe Ice Cube GALFA Instrumentation Robert Stobie Spectrograph RSS NIR Integral Field Spectroscopy Star Tracker 5000 WHAM Astrophysics in Physics Center for Magnetic Self Organization Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Observational Cosmology Theoretical Cosmology Research Observatories Southern African Large Telescope WIYN 3 5m Telescope Hydra WHIRC SparsePak WIYN 3 5 Bench Spectrograph ODI WIYN 0 9m Telescope Mosaic S2KB camera Pine Bluff Obervatory Research Facilities Computing Resources Instrumentation Labs Woodman Astronomical Library Machine and Electronics Shops Electronics Shop Instrumentation and Precision Machining General Machining Shop The Astronomical Journal Research Centers Collaborations GLIMPSE CMSO GALFA SKA Pathfinders Ice Cube Publications Item News Events News Events Colloquia Featured Science Newsletter Undergrads Astronomy Physics Major Courses Fall 2012 Courses Spring 2013 Courses Course Descriptions UW Course Schedule UW Madison REU Program Application Information Possible Projects Astronomy Department Physics Department Other REU Programs The Wisconsin Experience How to Apply Grad students The Astronomy Ph D Program Preparation and Prerequisites Advising Research Experience Preliminary Exam Doctoral Thesis Minor Financial Support Deadlines Courses Fall 2012 Courses Spring 2013 Courses Course Descriptions UW Course Schedule Graduate Student Life Citywide Events Music Theatre Film Eating Sports Graduate Community WOWSA How to Apply UW Madison Grad School Department of Astronomy Application Checklist Policies Procedures Medical and Family Leave Policy Success Stories The Turbulent Life Balancing Science and Sport The Public UW Space Place Outreach Center Space Place Events Space Place main page Public Observing at Washburn Open House Hours Directions Contact Info Washburn Events Calendar Universe

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/about-us/contact/ (2012-11-14)
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  • High-Res Simulations Help Solve Missing Massive Satellites Problem | UW-Madison Astronomy
    where they can run simulations with gas and stars at very high resolution Brooks is part of a team producing these high resolution simulations What they find when they include gas and stars dramatically alters the expectations of what we should see in satellite galaxies around the Milky Way In a series of papers to be published later this year Brooks and her collaborators have shown that the inclusion of stars that go supernovae can alter the dark matter structure of galaxies quite literally pushing dark matter out of the centers of satellites The overall effect is to lower the masses of the bright satellite galaxies we see When the masses predicted by dark matter only simulations are lowered by supernovae the predicted and observed masses of the Milky Way s satellites are brought into agreement solving the missing massive satellite problem that has haunted astronomers for more than a decade says Brooks Brooks and her team are now expanding the work demonstrating how the inclusion of normal matter impacts the lifetime of satellites When gas is included in simulations it forms a disk at the center of galaxies like the gas and stars that make up the disk of our Milky Way Dark matter alone does not form a disk galaxy The presence of the disk can shred satellite galaxies orbiting within a Milky Way galaxy altering the predicted number of satellites that should survive to the present day The NASA High End Computing HEC Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing NAS Division at Ames Research Center provided resources supporting this work and the National Science Foundation and The Grainger Foundation supported this research Twitter Facebook Other Articles High Res Simulations Help Solve Missing Massive Satellites Problem A slow spinning pulsar lights up its cradle A Laboratory for Early Stage Star Formation Fountain of Youth How Blue Stragglers Stay Young Turbulence Rocking the Galaxy GPU Computing Where Science Meets Games Neutron Star Fires Powerful Jets Related Links Online manuscript part 1 Online manuscript part 2 About Us General Information Contact Us Department History Historical Images Our People Directory Faculty Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science Results Galactic Structure GALFA GLIMPSE GLIMPSE360 Extragalactic Astronomy Cosmology Local Universe Star Forming Galaxies Galaxy Kinematics AGN Feedback Distant Universe Cosmic Evolution Galactic Winds Young Galaxies Galaxy Mergers High Energy Astrophysics Compact Objects AGN Feedback Microquasar Feedback Multi Phase Fluids Visualization Interacting Binaries White Dwarf Atmospheres X ray Binary Populations Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic Winds Astrophysical Dynamos Plasma and Turbulence Studies Rapid Reconnection Making

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/news-events/featured-science/high-res-simulations-help-solve-missing-massive-satellites-problem/ (2012-11-14)
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  • Venus Transit at Washburn & Space Place | UW-Madison Astronomy
    Lattis Solar viewers sold out almost immediately Transits of Venus are rare events This is only the second and last such transit visible this century They occur in pairs with eight years separating the transits in each pair The first in the current pair occurred in June 2004 the last one before that was in December 1882 And after this year s event the next transit of Venus will not occur until December 2117 The historic Washburn Telescope is among the handful of operational public telescopes to observe both the 1882 and the 2012 eclipses and with a little luck it will do so again in 2117 Above Professor Heinz demonstates how big the Sun is in relation to the image the small circle is the area of the Sun visible by the telescope under magnification Twitter Facebook Related Links Earth Magazine Coverage See the Stars Free public observing on campus at Washburn Observatory is hosted by an astronomer every 1 2 weeks throughout the year See Dates Details Join us on Facebook About Us General Information Contact Us Department History Historical Images Our People Directory Faculty Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science Results Galactic Structure GALFA GLIMPSE GLIMPSE360 Extragalactic Astronomy Cosmology Local Universe Star Forming Galaxies Galaxy Kinematics AGN Feedback Distant Universe Cosmic Evolution Galactic Winds Young Galaxies Galaxy Mergers High Energy Astrophysics Compact Objects AGN Feedback Microquasar Feedback Multi Phase Fluids Visualization Interacting Binaries White Dwarf Atmospheres X ray Binary Populations Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic Winds Astrophysical Dynamos Plasma and Turbulence Studies Rapid Reconnection Making Starbirth Easier Solar Tevatron Anomalous Cosmic Rays ISM Turbulence Massive Stars Observational Astronomy WOCS Interacting Binaries WHAM Local Universe Galaxy Kinematics Distant Universe Ice Cube GALFA Instrumentation Robert Stobie Spectrograph RSS NIR Integral Field Spectroscopy Star Tracker 5000 WHAM Astrophysics in Physics Center for Magnetic Self Organization Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Observational Cosmology Theoretical Cosmology Research Observatories Southern African Large Telescope WIYN 3 5m Telescope Hydra WHIRC SparsePak WIYN 3 5 Bench Spectrograph ODI WIYN 0 9m Telescope Mosaic S2KB camera Pine Bluff Obervatory Research Facilities Computing Resources Instrumentation Labs Woodman Astronomical Library Machine and Electronics Shops Electronics Shop Instrumentation and Precision Machining General Machining Shop The Astronomical Journal Research Centers Collaborations GLIMPSE CMSO GALFA SKA Pathfinders Ice Cube Publications Item News Events News Events Colloquia Featured Science Newsletter Undergrads Astronomy Physics Major Courses Fall 2012 Courses Spring 2013 Courses Course Descriptions UW Course Schedule UW Madison REU Program Application Information Possible Projects Astronomy Department Physics Department Other REU Programs

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/news-events/news/hundreds-view-venus-transit-at-washburn-space-place/ (2012-11-14)
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  • A slow-spinning pulsar lights up its cradle | UW-Madison Astronomy
    star formation in NGC 602 but detected a number of distant galaxies as well as a few stars and there lay the first scientific surprise One of the X ray bright stars was shown by team member Dr Chris Evans from the Royal Observatory to be a Be star Stars classified as spectral type Be are surrounded by disks of gas that they spin off their surfaces and have long been of interest at Wisconsin especially to our now emeritus Professors Cassinelli and Nordsieck In this case we found a double coincidence First the Be star has a companion neutron star that accretes gas from the Be star and produces X rays Second the Be star and its pulsar are located in the center of a glowing gas bubble produced by a supernova explosion The size of the supernova remnant allows us to estimate that a star exploded and gave birth to the pulsar about 25 000 years ago a result presented in our team research paper led by Edinburg graduate student Vincent Hénault Brunet All fine Pulsars are born in supernova explosions and are expected to be spinning fast But here was the surprise this object SXP 1062 one of the younger pulsars does not have a normal spin period of tens of seconds but instead rotates in about 18 minutes Why is it so slow Was it born that way which would have theoretical implications or is there some mechanism that can effectively stop a spinning pulsar in its tracks The answer currently is unclear but the observation carries an astrophysical implication that slowly spinning pulsars orbiting other Be stars a relatively common situation may be much younger than previously thought What next It seems likely that the SMC Wing holds other surprises Among these could be the presence of very massive stars in modest star clusters an effect that would stress some theories of massive star formation The SMC Wing is a case where what first looks like an astrophysical desert actually turns out to be a rich source of information about stars and star formation on the boundaries of galaxies Twitter Facebook Other Articles High Res Simulations Help Solve Missing Massive Satellites Problem A slow spinning pulsar lights up its cradle A Laboratory for Early Stage Star Formation Fountain of Youth How Blue Stragglers Stay Young Turbulence Rocking the Galaxy GPU Computing Where Science Meets Games Neutron Star Fires Powerful Jets Related Links Journal article NASA press release ESA press release About Us General Information Contact Us Department History Historical Images Our People Directory Faculty Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/news-events/featured-science/a-slow-spinning-pulsar-lights-up-its-cradle/ (2012-11-14)
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  • The Turbulent Life | UW-Madison Astronomy
    outreach coordinator she hosts a weekly show In Our Backyard Radio Astronomy on Madison s community radio station WORT gives talks at Space Place is active in the Universe in the Park program is involved in the annual Expanding Your Horizons program for middle school girls and participates in the annual Physics Fair and science exhibitions She has done demonstrations and discussed careers in science at several Madison area schools is a coordinator for the Women of Wisconsin Strengthening Astronomy WOWSA group which promotes women in astronomy and was a Madison Middle School Science Symposium mentor last year Her love of teaching also led her to obtain a master s degree in physics in order to prepare for future faculty positions in a wide range of colleges and universities Blakesley s life is full of turbulence beyond her involvement in research and department activities She loves to travel and her studies have taken her to spots on five continents including Brazil Europe Indonesia South Africa Costa Rica and Arizona If you have a travel bug astronomy s a great field to be in she says Her future plans include finishing her PhD and getting a post doc In her spare time she loves riding her Kawasaki Ninja motorcycle is a certified yoga teacher does Bikram Vinyasa yoga brews beer and plays ultimate Frisbee She s a captain of the Einstein Ringers ultimate Frisbee team composed of mostly astronomy and physics grad students The name is a play off of the gravitational lensing phenomenon and the frisbee term ringer which means a very good player Blakesley s list of awards is extensive She received the 2011 Jansky Award for her outstanding accomplishments in research as a grad student NASA s Wisconsin Space Grant Fellowship a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship in Astrophysics and a NASA Outreach Award for her department blog madtownastro com Coming to the UW was one of the best decisions of my life says Blakesley I m very happy here and love the department and all the opportunities it provides for its students About Us General Information Contact Us Department History Historical Images Our People Directory Faculty Emeriti Scientists Tech Staff Post Docs Grad Students Office Staff Our Science Research Areas Stars Stellar Systems WOCS Blue Stragglers Stellar Dynamics Angular Momentum in Solar Type Stars Massive Stars Magnetospheres Winds Pulsation Rotation GPU Computing Interacting Binaries Plasma Astrophysics Plasma and Turbulence Studies Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Interstellar Intergalactic Media WHAM GALFA Plasma and Turbulence Studies Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics GLIMPSE Galactic Astronomy WHAM Fabry Perot Spectroscopy Technical Description Science Results Galactic Structure GALFA GLIMPSE GLIMPSE360 Extragalactic Astronomy Cosmology Local Universe Star Forming Galaxies Galaxy Kinematics AGN Feedback Distant Universe Cosmic Evolution Galactic Winds Young Galaxies Galaxy Mergers High Energy Astrophysics Compact Objects AGN Feedback Microquasar Feedback Multi Phase Fluids Visualization Interacting Binaries White Dwarf Atmospheres X ray Binary Populations Ice Cube X ray Astrophysics in Physics Theory and Computation Compact Objects Theoretical Plasma Astrophysics Cosmic Rays and Galactic

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.wisc.edu/grad-students/success-stories/the-turbulent-life (2012-11-14)
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