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  • Using VIIRS imagery for snow/ice vs cloud discrimination over Alaska, the Arctic Ocean, and the Bering Sea « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    and a thin trail of wave clouds extending downwind of St Matthew Island Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel 1 61 µm near IR channel images GOES 15 0 63 µm visible channel images click image to play animation An animation of 1 km resolution GOES 15 0 63 µm visible channel images above click image to play animation showed the motion of the southern extent of the ice in the Bering Sea on 26 April On the previous day the sea ice had retreated northward from Saint George Island station identifier PAPB after a record setting 79 consecutive days with sea ice Farther to the north the sea ice would remain at Saint Paul Island station identifier PASN into early May also setting a new record for sea ice duration at that island A significant amount of sea ice motion could be seen on the GOES 15 visible images due to strong surface winds over the southern Bering Sea on that day In addition the visible images revealed some interesting wave clouds immediately downwind of the higher terrain of some of the Aleutian Islands A better view of the southern extent of ice in the Bering Sea was available using a 1 km resolution NOAA 19 AVHRR false color Red Green Blue RGB image below As with the GOES 15 images above Saint Paul Island and Saint George Island are located near the center of the image NOAA 19 AVHRR false color Red Green Blue RGB image Posted in Arctic AVHRR General interpretation GOES 15 POES Red Green Blue RGB images Suomi NPP VIIRS No Comments Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Mail will not be published required Website Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics November 2012 M T W T F S S Oct 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/10216 (2012-11-14)
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  • April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    image from the SSEC MODIS Today site below viewed using Google Earth showed even better detail of the snow covered high terrain MODIS true color RGB image viewed using Google Earth Posted in AVHRR GOES sounder GOES 13 Google Earth MODIS POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Winter weather No Comments Record high temperatures in the US Desert Southwest April 22nd 2012 MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel image MODIS Land Surface Temperature product A comparison of AWIPS images of 1 km resolution MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel data and the corresponding 1 km resolution MODIS Land Surface Temperature LST product at 21 22 UTC on 22 April 2012 above depicted marine layer stratus clouds extending inland along much of the California coast but farther inland most areas were cloud free with some of the interior deserts exhibiting very hot LST values as high as 148º F in the Death Valley region of California and 139º F in southern Nevada and southwestern Arizona An overlay of the 21 UTC METAR surface reports below showed that instrument shelter air temperatures were only in the 50s and 60s F beneath the marine layer stratus along coastal California but many air temperatures were over 100º F in the interior deserts A number of daily maximum temperature records were set on this day including 113º F at Furnace Creek in Death Valley California 105º F in Phoenix Arizona and 99º F in Las Vegas Nevada which tied their record for the warmest high temperature for the month of April and was also the earliest occurrence of a 99º F temperature many MODIS Land Surface Temperature product METAR surface reports 23 April Update Following the hot daytime temperatures on 22 April a night time MODIS Land Surface Temperature image showed that many of the lower elevations were still quite warm at 09 19 UTC below In Death Valley California LST values were still as warm as 86º F Lower elevations in the Grand Canyon in Arizona exhibited LST values in the 60s and 70s F while the higher elevation canyon rims had cooled into the 30s and 40s F In Arizona record high minimum temperatures for the date were set at Phoenix 77º F and Yuma 74º F MODIS Land Surface Temperature product Posted in General interpretation MODIS No Comments Volcanic ash plume from Popocatépetl in central Mexico April 18th 2012 GOES 15 left GOES 12 center and GOES 13 right visible channel images click image to play animation A small volcanic ash plume from Popocatépetl in central Mexico was seen streaming east southeastward on GOES 15 GOES West GOES 12 and GOES 13 GOES East visible channel images above click image to play animation during the early morning hours on 18 April 2012 Satellite imagery over this particular region is available every 15 minutes on a routine basis from GOES 13 but only every 30 minutes from GOES 15 and every 3 hours from GOES 12 According to the advisory issued

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/page/2 (2012-11-14)
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  • 02 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    storm s cold frontal boundary MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product click image to play animation Later in the day an overpass of a EUMETSAT MetOp satellite provided ASCAT ocean surface winds over the large occluded storm as it was moving slowly off the coast of British Columbia Canada A comparison of 1 km resolution MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel and MODIS 11 0 µm IR channel images with an overlay of ASCAT wind vectors is shown below MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel and 11 0 µm IR channel images MetOp ASCAT scatterometer surface winds Posted in AVHRR GOES sounder GOES 15 Marine weather MODIS POES Satellite winds No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics April 2012 M T W T F S S Mar May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/02 (2012-11-14)
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  • 03 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    top signatures and 2 the parallax shift of the storm top features due to the large viewing angle from the GOES 13 GOES East satellite GOES 13 10 7 µm IR channel image MODIS 11 0 µm IR channel image A similar MODIS vs GOES 13 IR image comparison about 90 minutes later below again showed how the numerous cold overshooting tops were much more apparent on the 1 km resolution MODIS image MODIS 11 0 µm IR channel image GOES 13 10 7 µm IR channel image Even greater detail could be seen on a 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 11 450 µm IR channel image at 19 33 UTC below which showed a number of cold overshooting tops with IR brightness temperature values in the 70 to 79 C range dark black to white color enhancement Hail of 2 0 inches in diameter was being reported just to the west and just to the east of Dallas Fort Worth International Airport DFW at 19 30 UTC Suomi NPP VIIRS 11 450 µm IR channel image Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel 11 450 µm IR channel images McIDAS A comparison of the 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel and 11 450 µm IR channel images can be seen using McIDAS above and AWIPS below Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel 11 450 µm IR channel images AWIPS Posted in GOES 13 Lightning MODIS Severe convection Suomi NPP VIIRS 1 Comment Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics April 2012 M T W T F S S Mar May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving Ground at the Aviation Weather Testbed The Wide World of SPoRT UMBC U S Air Quality The Smog Blog US Severe Weather Blog VIIRS Imagery and

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/03 (2012-11-14)
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  • 04 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    images One interesting question to ask is was this southward propagating squall line initiated by outflow boundaries from the large mesoscale convective system that produced the widespread large hail and tornado event across northeastern Texas during the afternoon and evening hours on 03 April A long sequence of GOES 13 10 7 µm IR channel images below click image to play animation does suggest a possible connection GOES 13 10 7 µm IR images click image to play animation Posted in AVHRR Aviation GOES 13 Lightning POES Severe convection No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics April 2012 M T W T F S S Mar May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/04 (2012-11-14)
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  • 06 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics April 2012 M T W T F S S Mar May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving Ground at the Aviation Weather Testbed The Wide World of SPoRT UMBC U S Air Quality The Smog Blog US Severe Weather Blog VIIRS Imagery and Visualization Team Blog VISIT Meteorological Interpretation Weather Channel Blogs Weather Underground Blogs WGN Weather Center Blog Satellite imagery sources CIMSS GOES Derived Product Imagery CIMSS Tropical Cyclones Environmental Remote Sensing Center SSEC GINA University of Alaska Fairbanks NWS WFO scale satellite images eastern US NWS WFO scale satellite images western

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/06 (2012-11-14)
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  • 07 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    IR image A sequence of 1 km resolution MODIS and POES AVHRR 3 7 µm shortwave IR images below showed the diurnal change in size of the fire hot spot signature red to yellow to black color enhancement MODIS and POES AVHRR 3 7 µm shortwave IR images A comparison of 4 km resolution GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR imagery with 1 km resolution MODIS 3 7 µm shortwave IR imagery in the early afternoon hours below demonstrated the advantage of higher spatial resolution for more accuately determining the exact location of the County Line fire in far northern Florida as well as the ability to detect a few of the smaller fires that were burning at that time in other parts of Florida and southern Georgia MODIS 3 7 µm shortwave IR GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR images Finally a comparison of 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 3 74 µm shortwave IR and 11 450 µm longwave IR images below provided even greater detail about the location and size of the fire Even though the core portion of the fire was hot enough to exhibit a hot spot on the longwave IR image the superior high temperature sensitivity of the shortwave IR channel gave a much more accurate view of the full areal coverage of the most intense portion of the fire red color enhancement as well as the location of active fire lines black enhacement out ahead of the main fire hot spot Suomi NPP VIIRS 3 74 µm shortwave IR and 11 450 µm longwave IR images Posted in Air quality AVHRR Fire detection GOES 13 Google Earth MODIS POES Red Green Blue RGB images Suomi NPP VIIRS 1 Comment Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics April 2012 M T W T F S S Mar May 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/07 (2012-11-14)
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  • 15 « April « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    OT TC automated detection products showed a good correlation with the map of plotted SPC storm reports below UW Convective Initiation Overshooting Top and Thermal Couplet detections Finally a comparison of 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel 11 45 µm IR channel and 3 74 µm shortwave IR channel images centered near the Dodge City Kansas KDDC area below showed a pair of well defined enhanced V signatures with cold warm thermal couplet IR brightness temperatures in excess of 25º C which also exhibited anvil plumes extending downwind to the northeast of the vertex of each enhanced V The enhanced V storm just to the southeast of Dodge City was producing a tornado and 1 75 inch diameter hail at the time of the VIIRS images In addition the IR and shortwave IR images revealed a number of southwest to northeast oriented swaths of cooler ground lighter gray enhancement due to heavy rainfall from the recent passage of thunderstorms Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel 11 45 µm IR channel and 3 74 µm shortwave IR channel images Farther to the northeast a comparison of 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel and 11 450 µm IR channel images below showed that the thunderstorms over northeastern Kansas southeastern Nebraska and southwestern Iowa were exhibiting well defined overshooting tops with packets of concentric anvil top gravity waves propagating away from some of the strongest overshooting top features The satellite detected a cloud top IR brightness temperature as cold as 85º C purple color enhancment associated with the overshooting top over far southern Nebraska Suomi NPP VIIRS 0 64 µm visible channel and 11 450 µm IR channel images On a side note it is interesting to point out that a 1 km resolution MODIS 6 7 µm water vapor channel image at 04 17 UTC below displayed an elongated north to south oriented wave packet from Nebraska into Kansas and there was a pilot report of severe turbulence at a flight altitude of 31 000 feet over this water vapor wave signature These waves were not seen in the corresponding 04 17 UTC MODIS IR image implying that they were likely located within the middle troposphere GOES 13 water vapor weighting function plot MODIS 6 7 µm water vapor channel image Pilot reports of turbulence 4 km resolution 6 5 µm water vapor channel images from GOES 15 GOES West and GOES 13 GOES East below click image to play animation suggested that this gravity wave may have formed in response to pronounced middle tropospheric subsidence drying related to the formation of a strong rear flank downdraft along the trailing edge of the thunderstorm that was located in central Kansas around 01 00 UTC schematic diagram from Lemon and Doswell 1979 This packet of waves generally remained quasi stationary but did begin to move westward around the time of the pilot report of severe turbulence However it is also possible

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/04/15 (2012-11-14)
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