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  • Leap Day 2012 Severe Weather « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    eastward a tornado which produced the first documented EF4 damage of 2012 moved through the southern part of Harrisburg Illinois around 10 56 UTC 4 56 am local time This tornado was also responsible for 6 deaths NWS Paducah KY Public Information Statement See the WeatherMatrix Blog for a detailed radar based discussion of this event An AWIPS image of 1 km resolution POES AVHRR 10 8 µm IR data at 11 03 UTC shortly after the tornado moved through Harrisburg IL with overlays of severe storm reports below shows that the Harrisburg supercell produced hail up to 2 50 inches in diameter and a number of damaging wind reports between 09 41 UTC and 10 56 UTC as it moved northeastward from far eastern Missouri across southern Illinois POES AVHRR 10 8 µm IR image Hail Severe Wind Gust and Tornado reports As seen in the 1 km resolution POES AVHRR image comparison below along the pre frontal squall line the 10 8 µm cloud top IR brightness temperatures were as cold as 73º C darker black color enhancement in the IR image cloud top heights were as high as 12 km darker green on the Cloud Top Height product and a large area of cloud tops was designated as Overshooting the tropopause violet on the Cloud Type product POES AVHRR 10 8 µm IR image Cloud Top Height and Cloud Type products A sequence of 4 km resolution GOES 13 10 7 µm IR images with an overlay of Automated Overshooting Tops Detection below showed an overshooting top associated with the supercell at 10 15 UTC over southern Illinois nearly 45 minutes before the tornado moved through Harrisburg station identifier KHSB GOES 13 10 7 µm IR images Overshooting Top Detection Posted in AVHRR General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 13 POES Severe convection No Comments Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Mail will not be published required Website Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics November 2012 M T W T F S S Oct 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/9839 (2012-11-14)
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  • CIMSS Model Analyses and Forecasts
    at end Theta E 03 HR Nearcast loop Theta E 06 HR Nearcast loop Theta E 09 HR Nearcast loop Model Comparisons of Latest Nearcast cycle Comparisons and Tests These computer forecasts are EXPERIMENTAL and are used by atmospheric scientists to assess the value of satellite observations in numerical weather prediction Although the accuracy of these products is consistently good forecast errors can occur due to non receipt of data observation errors and computer problems The forecasts are fully automated and are not always closely monitored by CIMSS scientists The risk of using the CCDNM to plan weather sensitive activities falls on the user Feedback will help us improve deficiencies in the CCDNM Please forward any comments to the CRASmaster using the contact form About these Forecasts Information from the GOES 13 sounder water vapor channels help to define the regions most susceptible to convection on that day This technique initializes a trajectory model with Rapid Update Cycle RUC winds and precipitable water at different levels as retrieved from the GOES 13 sounder The retrieval uses the three water vapor channels channels 10 7 4 microns 11 7 0 microns and 12 6 5 microns The shorter wavelength energy typically is emitted from higher in the atmosphere GOES sounder weighting functions from channel 10 typically peak around 600 or 700 mb weighting functions from channel 12 peak closer to 400 mb The exact level is of course a function of the air mass and the satellite viewing angle These three channels can help to define the distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere at different levels the output of the retrieval that combines the brightness temperatures and initial guess soundings is precipitable water mm at different levels Such a multi layer description of the atmospheric water vapor is not possible

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/model/nrc/ (2012-11-14)
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  • DAMAGE 180 MPH PEAK BASED ON NUMEROUS LEVELED AND DISPLACED HOMES AVERAGE PATH WIDTH 275 YARDS UPDATED FROM EARLIER 250 YARD AVERAGE WIDTH TRACK LENGTH 26 5 MILES FROM 1 MILE NORTH OF CARRIER MILLS ILLINOIS TO 4 MILES NORTHEAST OF RIDGWAY ILLINOIS UPDATED FOR EASTERN EXTENT OF PATH DISCUSSION DAMAGE IN HARRISBURG OVER 200 HOMES AND ABOUT 25 BUSINESSES WERE DESTROYED OR HEAVILY DAMAGED INCLUDING A STRIP MALL DESTROYED

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/120229_pah_pns.text (2012-11-14)
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  • Stray Light Corrections in GVAR Signal for GOES-East « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    light in the images prior to GVAR broadcast Option 4 has been implemented for GOES 13 Currently option 3 is being implemented for GOES 15 3 9 micrometer images showing stray light contamination left and corrected version right The figure above shows a 3 9 micrometer image with a significant amount of stray light contamination in the southwest part of the image The corrected version is also shown Note that the contamination extends throughout the picture brightness temperatures are too warm even in regions away from the large contamination over the central United States for example compare the brightness temperatures of the cloud tops in the scene The contaminated 3 9 micrometer data are corrected using two sources of information For regions outside 6 degrees the known amount of additional stray light is subtracted from the signal If the sun is within 6 degrees of the pixel and the stray light signal is overwhelming signals from the longer wavelength channels are used in combination with the 3 9 micrometer signal to estimate the true 3 9 micrometer signal Linear relationships between the IR channels will vary with geographical location Other thermal channel data that contain much less stray light are used in each of 256 geographic bins as input into multiple linear regressions relating 3 9 micrometer data or 6 5 micrometer data to 10 7 and 13 3 micrometer data The hybrid image that results is uniformly cooler with a clear signal in a region formerly overwhelmed by stray light The algorithm was developed by ITT and implemented by NOAA NESDIS Current plans call for correcting the GOES 15 Imager during the fall 2012 eclipse season This ftp site contains more information The GOES Eclipse schedule is here This is the White Paper on Stray Light Finally click here for more information on GVAR Finally here is the notification from SSD that the Stray Light Correction was implemented Posted in Calibration Anomalies GOES 13 GOES 15 No Comments Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Mail will not be published required Website Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics November 2012 M T W T F S S Oct 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/9816 (2012-11-14)
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  • Plume of blowing sand from the White Sands National Monument in New Mexico « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    in tandem with very dry air were creating conditions favorable for wildfire activity one such fire could be seen in the southern Texas panhandle region in a comparison of 1 km resolution MODIS 3 7 µm and GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR images below MODIS 3 7 µm and GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR images Additional information and imagery from this event can be found on the Wide World of SPoRT blog Posted in Air quality Fire detection GOES 13 GOES 15 Google Earth MODIS Red Green Blue RGB images No Comments Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply Name required Mail will not be published required Website Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics November 2012 M T W T F S S Oct 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/9811 (2012-11-14)
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  • February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    color image A comparison of AWIPS images of MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel data with the corresponding MODIS false color Red Green Blue RGB image above showed a large swath of snow on the ground on 20 February 2012 in the wake of a winter storm that moved across the Mid Atlantic region the previous day The snow cover appears as shades of red on the false color image in contrast to the patches of supercooled water droplet clouds that persisted over the western half of the snow swath Farther to the west strong winds gusting to 60 70 mph behind a cold front were causing an outbreak of blowing dust across parts of far eastern New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle A comparison of a MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel image with the corresponding 1 3 µm cirrus detection channel image below demonstrated how the near IR cirrus channel can be used to better identify the areal extent of the blowing dust which might not be apparent on the visible channel imagery The cirrus detection channel is sensitive to particles that are good scatterers of light such as ice crystals dust volcanic ash and smoke haze MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel MODIS 1 3 µm cirrus detection channel images A comparison of the MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel image with the corresponding MODIS 11 12 µm IR difference product below demonstrates how 11 12 µm difference values of 1 2 degrees C yellow color enhancement highlighted areas where the dust concentration was highest Airborne dust particles have different emissivities at the 11 µm and 12 µm wavelengths which allows such an IR difference product to be used to locate and track blowing dust Recall that the older series of GOES satellites GOES 8 through GOES 11 had a 12 0 µm IR channel that allowed the creation of a similar IR difference product but on the latest satellites GOES 13 through GOES 15 the 12 0 µm IR channel was replaced with a 13 3 µm channel MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel image MODIS 11 12 µm IR difference image A closer view of the blowing dust cloud can be seen using 250 meter resolution MODIS true color RGB images from the SSEC MODIS Today site below Some of the primary source regions of the blowing dust located in New Mexico can be seen on the earlier Terra image at 17 56 UTC Terra and Aqua MODIS true color Red Green Blue RGB images In the southeastern Texas Panhandle a multiple vehicle accident occurred along Highway 287 around 20 00 UTC 3 00 pm local time causing a closure of that section of highway between Memphis and Childress station identifier KCDS McIDAS images of 1 km resolution GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel data below click image to play animation showed that an optically thick band of blowing dust was moving through the region between Memphis and Childress around the time of the

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/page/2 (2012-11-14)
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  • 04 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    of high level cirrus clouds could also be seen over the snow cover Bare ground appeared cyan on the false color image MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel False color Red Green Blue RGB images About 2 hours later a more detailed example of using false color images to discriminate between snow cover and supercooled water droplet clouds can be seen with a 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS Red Green Blue RGB image below created using Band I1 0 64 micrometer visible as the red component and Band I3 1 61 micrometer near IR as the green and blue components of the image Suomi NPP VIIRS false color RGB image Farther to the east and south heavy rainfall amounts included 9 30 inches at Romayer Texas 5 69 inches at Alexandria Louisiana and 4 34 inches at Medicine Lodge Kansas Wichita Kansas received 2 86 inches of rain the wettest February day on record at that location Severe thunderstorms produced one tornado and hail up to 2 0 inches in diameter in Texas SPC storm reports A McIDAS image of 375 meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS 11 45 µm IR channel data below showed very intricate detail to the cloud top IR brightess temperature structure associated with strong thunderstorms producing heavy rainfall and flash flooding across the Interstate 35 corridor in the Austin San Antonio Texas region during the pre dawn hours on 04 February VIIRS IR brightness temperatures were as cold as 81º C with the far southwestern storm and rare warm trench signatures a ring of warmer cloud top temperatures surrounding a well defined cold overshootng top were seen associated with the 2 storms located near Austin Bergstrom International airport KAUS and Houston County Airport KDKR Suomi NPP VIIRS 11 45 µm IR image Station locations and Interstate highways 05 February Update A large portion of the resulting swath of snow on the ground across parts of Wyoming Colorado Nebraska and Kansas could be seen on a 250 meter resolution MODIS true color RGB image from the SSEC MODIS Today site below viewed using Google Earth at 20 17 UTC on 05 February 2012 MODIS true color image viewed using Google Earth Posted in AVHRR GOES 13 Google Earth Heavy rain flooding MODIS POES Red Green Blue RGB images Suomi NPP VIIRS Winter weather No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/04 (2012-11-14)
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  • 06 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    Advisories MODIS fog stratus product with METAR surface reports As part of CIMSS participation in GOES R Proving Ground activities products are being developed which can provide more quantitative information about such parameters as Fog Depth and the Probability of Marginal Visual Flight Rules MVFR or Instrument Flight Rules IFR conditions below In this case across the southwestern part of Iowa where widespread freezing fog was being reported the fog depth was as high as 1400 1500 feet with probabilities of MVFR and IFR conditions as high as 75 90 and 60 75 respectively MODIS Fog Depth MVFR Probability and IFR Probability products Shortly after sunrise it is interesting to note that a comparison of 1 km resolution POES AVHRR 0 63 µm visible channel 3 74 µm shortwave IR channel and 10 8 µm channel IR window channel images below revealed that part of the swath of fresh snow cover as deep as 4 6 inches across western Iowa could be seen through the translucent western edge of the fog stratus deck that was beginning to burn off during the morning hours The fog stratus deck appears warmer darker gray enhancement om the 3 74 µm image due to the sensitivity of that channel to the reflection of solar radiation off the tops of supercooled water droplet clouds Farther to the south note the presence of narrow fingers of valley fog in the Ozark Mountains and surrounding regions in Oklahoma Arkansas and Missouri POES AVHRR 0 63 µm visible 3 74 µm shortwave IR and 10 8 µm IR window images Posted in AVHRR Fog detection General interpretation GOES 13 GOES R MODIS POES Winter weather No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/06 (2012-11-14)
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