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  • 07 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    streaming off the continent of Africa and moving west southwestward out over the adjacent waters of the eastern Atlantic Ocean on 07 February 2012 In addition a pair of long von Karman vortex streets can be seen moving southwestward from the Cape Verde islands While the viewing angle was more extreme the Saharan dust could also be seen on GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel images below GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel images surface reports The emergence of this Saharan dust over water can be seen to occur around 00 00 UTC on 06 February on the Meteosat 9 Saharan Air Layer tracking product below EUMETSAT Meteosat 9 Saharan Air Layer tracking product Posted in GOES 13 Meteosat No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/07 (2012-11-14)
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  • 13 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    in Meteosat Satellite winds Tropical cyclones No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving Ground at the Aviation Weather Testbed The Wide World of SPoRT UMBC U S Air Quality The Smog Blog US Severe Weather Blog VIIRS Imagery and Visualization Team Blog VISIT Meteorological Interpretation Weather Channel Blogs Weather Underground Blogs WGN Weather Center Blog Satellite imagery sources CIMSS GOES Derived Product Imagery CIMSS Tropical Cyclones Environmental Remote Sensing Center SSEC GINA University of Alaska Fairbanks NWS WFO scale satellite images eastern US NWS

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/13 (2012-11-14)
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  • 17 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    a well defined signal of the fog stratus that was in place across parts of the Ohio River Valley region on 17 February 2012 Note that a number of stations were reporting night time fog and or freezing fog in parts of far eastern Missouri southern Illinois and Indiana and western Kentucky 4 km resolution GOES 13 and 1 km resolution MODIS fog stratus product Even with the improved 1 km resolution of the MODIS fog stratus product no good signal was displayed at 03 40 UTC above or at 07 52 UTC below over the areas that were reporting fog freezing fog 4 km resolution GOES 13 and 1 km resolution MODIS fog stratus product As part of CIMSS participation in GOES R Proving Ground activities new satellite products are being developed and tested and one such product is an Instrument Flight Rules IFR Probability product below click image to play animation This IFR Probability product blends satellite data and model fields to display regions where the cloud ceiling is likely to be between 500 and 1000 feet The IFR Probability product did a much better job at highlighting the relatively large area where IFR cloud ceiling conditions were present at a number of reporting stations some of which were experiencing cloud ceilings of 100 to 200 feet along with freezing fog limiting the visibility to 0 3 miles at times for example Effingham IL K1H2 Mount Vernon IL KMVN Harrisburg IL KHSB Lawrenceville IL KLWV Bloomington IN KBMG Cape Girardeau MO KGCI Pahducah KY KPAH GOES 13 IFR Probability product click image to play animation GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel images below click image to play animation showed the areas of fog stratus burning off quickly after sunrise and the fog stratus appeared to be relatively shallow in nature The fact that the fog stratus did not appear to be very thick may have been a factor that limited detection by the traditional GOES 13 10 7 3 9 µm and MODIS 11 3 7 µm fog stratus products GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel image click image to play animation Posted in Fog detection GOES 13 GOES R MODIS No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/17 (2012-11-14)
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  • 20 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    µm difference values of 1 2 degrees C yellow color enhancement highlighted areas where the dust concentration was highest Airborne dust particles have different emissivities at the 11 µm and 12 µm wavelengths which allows such an IR difference product to be used to locate and track blowing dust Recall that the older series of GOES satellites GOES 8 through GOES 11 had a 12 0 µm IR channel that allowed the creation of a similar IR difference product but on the latest satellites GOES 13 through GOES 15 the 12 0 µm IR channel was replaced with a 13 3 µm channel MODIS 0 65 µm visible channel image MODIS 11 12 µm IR difference image A closer view of the blowing dust cloud can be seen using 250 meter resolution MODIS true color RGB images from the SSEC MODIS Today site below Some of the primary source regions of the blowing dust located in New Mexico can be seen on the earlier Terra image at 17 56 UTC Terra and Aqua MODIS true color Red Green Blue RGB images In the southeastern Texas Panhandle a multiple vehicle accident occurred along Highway 287 around 20 00 UTC 3 00 pm local time causing a closure of that section of highway between Memphis and Childress station identifier KCDS McIDAS images of 1 km resolution GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel data below click image to play animation showed that an optically thick band of blowing dust was moving through the region between Memphis and Childress around the time of the accident GOES 13 0 63 µm visible channel images click image to play animation Posted in Air quality GOES 13 MODIS Red Green Blue RGB images Winter weather No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/20 (2012-11-14)
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  • 22 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving Ground at the Aviation Weather Testbed The Wide World of SPoRT UMBC U S Air Quality The Smog Blog US Severe Weather Blog VIIRS Imagery and Visualization Team Blog VISIT Meteorological Interpretation Weather Channel Blogs Weather Underground Blogs WGN Weather Center Blog Satellite imagery sources CIMSS GOES Derived Product Imagery CIMSS Tropical Cyclones Environmental Remote Sensing Center SSEC GINA University of Alaska Fairbanks NWS WFO scale satellite images eastern US NWS WFO scale satellite images western US SOSE

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/22 (2012-11-14)
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  • 24 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    suggested the presence of a thermal couplet that is a warm trench downwind of an overshoot as shown above This storm was part of a complex of warned severe storms over eastern Georgia This storm continued to display tornadic features as it moved northeastward into coastal eastern South Carolina Posted in AVHRR General interpretation GOES 13 Severe convection No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples GOES R Hazardous Weather Testbed METSUL blog NOAA NESDIS Operational Significant Event Imagery NSSTC Collaborative Weather Blog PREDICT Field Experiment Blog The GOES R Proving Ground at the Aviation Weather Testbed The Wide World of SPoRT UMBC U S Air Quality The Smog Blog

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/24 (2012-11-14)
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  • 28 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    water vapor channel images The strong surface winds in tandem with very dry air were creating conditions favorable for wildfire activity one such fire could be seen in the southern Texas panhandle region in a comparison of 1 km resolution MODIS 3 7 µm and GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR images below MODIS 3 7 µm and GOES 13 3 9 µm shortwave IR images Additional information and imagery from this event can be found on the Wide World of SPoRT blog Posted in Air quality Fire detection GOES 13 GOES 15 Google Earth MODIS Red Green Blue RGB images No Comments Webmaster Follow us on Search for Pages About this site CIMSS Satellite Proving Ground Contact us Mobile users POES AVHRR in AWIPS SatePedia Suomi NPP JPSS Proving Ground VISIT SHyMet Training Topics February 2012 M T W T F S S Jan Mar 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Categories Air quality Antarctic Arctic AVHRR Aviation AWIPS II Calibration Anomalies Cloud Top Cooling Convective Initiation Fire detection Fog detection General interpretation GOES sounder GOES 10 GOES 11 GOES 12 GOES 13 GOES 14 GOES 15 GOES R Google Earth Heavy rain flooding Historical Hydrology Lightning Marine weather McIDAS V Meteosat MODIS MTSAT Other Satellites POES Red Green Blue RGB images Satellite winds Severe convection Suomi NPP Synthetic satellite imagery Training Tropical cyclones VIIRS Volcanic activity Web Map Server What the heck is this Winter weather Other blogs of interest AccuWeather Blogs CIMSS GOES Gallery CIMSS TPARC Support CIRA GOES R Proving Ground Blog EUMETSAT Image Gallery Geographic Information Network of Alaska GOES R and JPSS National Centers Perspective GOES R Fog Product Examples

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/28 (2012-11-14)
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  • 29 « February « 2012 « CIMSS Satellite Blog
    Four IR Channel from imager with stray light contamination There are periodic and predictable errors within the raw signal on the GOES satellites that arise when sunlight hits the Satellite so that it emits radiation that is detected by the sensor or when satellite structures reflect energy towards the sensors There errors usually arise when the Sun is close to being viewed directly by the sensor near Satellite Midnight NOAA NESDIS has recently 22 February 2012 implemented a series of corrections to mitigate these errors on the GOES 13 Imager Not only does this increase the number of useable images but it makes derived products cloud top pressure for example more accurate Parameters pertinent to the correction are included within Block 0 of the GVAR signal In McIDAS these bits relating to the stray light status are included as part of the AREA line prefix An example of the error in the raw or un corrected signal is shown at top with data from the four infrared channels 3 9 6 5 10 7 and 13 3 micrometers shown Note the comparative magnitude of the extra radiation it is far stronger and more widespread in the 3 9 micrometer image because the sun emits so much more radiation at that wavelength The Imager band most affected is the visible band click here to see two contaminated and uncorrected and one clean image the images above are at night Options to deal with the stray light errors included 1 Send all imagery regardless of solar position contamination and let users decide 2 Cancel images if the sun is within 6 degrees currently or 10 degrees of the frame boundary 3 Scan away from the sun for example scan only the Northern Hemisphere if the solar contamination is in the Southern Hemisphere during the Spring eclipse season and 4 Apply an L1B algorithmic correction to minimize stray light in the images prior to GVAR broadcast Option 4 has been implemented for GOES 13 Currently option 3 is being implemented for GOES 15 3 9 micrometer images showing stray light contamination left and corrected version right The figure above shows a 3 9 micrometer image with a significant amount of stray light contamination in the southwest part of the image The corrected version is also shown Note that the contamination extends throughout the picture brightness temperatures are too warm even in regions away from the large contamination over the central United States for example compare the brightness temperatures of the cloud tops in the scene The contaminated 3 9 micrometer data are corrected using two sources of information For regions outside 6 degrees the known amount of additional stray light is subtracted from the signal If the sun is within 6 degrees of the pixel and the stray light signal is overwhelming signals from the longer wavelength channels are used in combination with the 3 9 micrometer signal to estimate the true 3 9 micrometer signal Linear relationships between the IR channels will

    Original URL path: http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/archives/date/2012/02/29 (2012-11-14)
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