archive-edu.com » EDU » W » WISC.EDU

Total: 671

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Center for Journalism Ethics
    Kristensen October 15 2014 Rolling Stone journalist and Koch Industries exchange barbs over fairness A Rolling Stone s contributing editor and Koch Industries recently got into a battle of conflicting reports regarding Koch Industries practices and history raising questions of subjectivity and objectivity Tim Dickinson a contributing editor for Rolling Stone writing primarily on National Affairs recently wrote an in depth story outlining how Charles and David Koch the CEO and By Dave Wilcox October 9 2014 Campaign season raises ethical issues of press access plagiarism and fairness As candidates enter the last month of campaigning in this election season seemingly perennial ethical issues between journalists and candidates as well as between candidates themselves are once again presenting themselves around the country One need look no further than our local Wisconsin media this week to find charges of credentialed journalists being denied access By Dave Wilcox October 8 2014 Center for Journalism Ethics 2015 Conference to focus on Sports Journalism The Center for Journalism Ethics will address the topic of ethics in sports journalism at our seventh annual conference which will be held April 10 2015 at Union South on the University of Wisconsin Madison campus The conference titled Fair or Foul Ethics and Sports Journalism will feature Robert Lipsyte veteran sports journalist author and current ombudsman By Julia Jacobson May 19 2014 Conference 2014 through the eyes of an undergraduate journalism student As an undergraduate journalism student I spend much of my time generating stories and little time reflecting on the bigger questions of my writing Finishing projects under a deadline or contacting just the right person for a quote often seems more important than debating the pros and cons of drone technology But working with the By Meredith Lee May 19 2014 Conference 2014 keynote Media Minefields Journalism National Security and the Right to Know Eric Lichtblau a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter in the Washington Bureau of The New York Times challenged government pressure and prosecution of journalists in the name of national security and instead encouraged journalists to continue publishing stories to widen the ongoing debate regarding national security in his keynote address Media Minefields Journalism National Security and the By Staff May 1 2014 Goldman Apuzzo Bridis and AP are 2014 recipients of the Center for Journalism Ethics Shadid Award 2014 Shadid Award Winner Associated Press Adam Goldman Matt Apuzzo and Ted Bridis Missing American in Iran was on unapproved mission The AP s Adam Goldman received a tip from a confidential source that turned out to be the story of an American who disappeared in 2007 on what the U S government always maintained was a By Julia Jacobson updated by Dave Wilcox April 30 2014 Email exchanges suggest CNN s Chicagoland producers collaborated with Mayor Rahm Emanuel According to the Chicago Tribune Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel had an instrumental hand in shaping certain scenes of CNN s supposedly unscripted documentary Chicagoland The Tribune reviewed more than 700 emails which reveal that the producers worked

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Ethics in a Nutshell | Center for Journalism Ethics
    relations Research ethics in academia and the private sector Environmental ethics including the ethical treatment of animals Global ethics ethics of international affairs human rights Communication ethics including media public relations and journalism Theoretical and Applied Ethics Ethical inquiry can occur on many levels of thought according to one s focus There are two main types of ethical inquiry Theoretical ethics and applied ethics Theoretical ethics is concerned with understanding the nature of ethics ethical language and ethical reasoning The focus of applied ethics is more practical it wants to reach a practical judgment about what should be done in situation x or what is the most coherent ethical view to take towards a serious issue such as abortion or euthanasia However the theoretical applied distinction is not absolute It is a matter of emphasis and interest Any serious ethical thinking will include practical and theoretical considerations Theoretical ethics The theoretical study of the main concepts and methods of ethics Major questions include the nature of ethical language the objectivity of ethical beliefs and the nature of ethical reasoning Ethical philosophy for example is the systematic study of ethical experience and the justification of moral notions beginning with those that historically and by current estimation are the most important Applied ethics The application and evaluation of the principles that guide practice in particular domains Applied ethics concerns the issues and problems specific to the field in question Major questions include how existing principles apply to new issues the ranking of rival principles the standards of best practice in a profession and ethical decision making in the field Professional ethics is a major division of applied ethics It is the application and evaluation of norms in various professions Since the mid 1900s many institutes centers and journals have been established to study and enhance nursing ethics business ethics biomedical ethics journalism ethics and the ethics of government and corporate governance Types of Theories In theoretical and applied ethics philosophers and other writers have advanced numerous theories to answer one or more major ethical questions The number of theories and their many variations are too numerous to list here However there are several ways in which we categorize and group together the many theories For example we focus on a major aspect of ethical action such as goods rights or virtue or we can categorize theories according to how they justify ethical judgments Focusing on a major aspect One way to approach ethics is to focus on one of four recurring aspects of ethical actions rights goods virtues and our communal relations with others Ethical inquiry into correct conduct involves 1 questions about whether an action honors or violates anyone s rights or duties 2 questions about the goods that should be pursued often thought of as the harmful or beneficial consequences of action 3 the impact of action on the virtue of the actors their character and integrity These three aspects provide a way to categorize ethical theories Theories are categorized

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/ethics-in-a-nutshell/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Holding Media Accountable | Center for Journalism Ethics
    Judges A Tribute to Anthony Shadid Resources Donate Holding Media Accountable Accountability and Complaints Upset about a news organization or report Where should you turn A good place to start is to read this section It contains links to press and broadcast councils ombudsmen and other media entities where you can register a complaint or express concerns http www newsombudsmen org Organization of News Ombudsmen includes links to many ombuds http www presscouncils org Site is dedicated to media accountability and contains the largest collection of press codes of conduct in the world http www media accountability org Media Accountability Systems a comprehensive ethics site affiliated with the Missouri School of Journalism http www wanewscouncil org Active news council that holds public hearings to vote on complaints against media outlets in Washington State http topics nytimes com top opinion thepubliceditor index html New York Times Public Editor http www npr org ombudsman National Public Radio USA Ombudsman http www cbc ca ombudsman Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Ombudsman http news council org Minnesota News Council Promoting fair vigorous and trusted journalism since 1970 http www bcpresscouncil org British Columbia Press Council http www ontpress com Ontario Press Council http www conseildepresse qc

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/holding-media-accountable/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Digital Media Ethics | Center for Journalism Ethics
    someone who does engage in journalism is Stewart a journalist Is a person expressing their opinions on their Facebook site a journalist What is journalism A lack of clarity over who is a journalist leads to definitional disputes over who is doing journalism That leads to the question What is journalism Many people believe What is journalism or Is he or she doing journalism is a more important question than whether who can call themselves a journalist At least three approaches to this question are possible skeptical empirical and normative Skeptically one dismisses the question itself as unimportant For example one might say that anyone can be a journalist and it is not worth arguing over who gets to call themselves a journalist One is skeptical about attempts to define journalism Empirically there is a more systematic and careful approach to the question We can look at clear examples of journalism over history and note the types of activities in which journalists engaged e g gathering information editing stories publishing news and opinion Then we use these features to provide a definition of journalism that separates it from novel writing storytelling or editing information for a government database The normative approach insists that writers should not be called journalists unless they have highly developed skills acquired usually through training or formal education and unless they honor certain ethical norms The skills include investigative capabilities research skills facility with media technology of media knowledge of how institutions work and highly developed communication skills The ethical norms include a commitment to accuracy verification truth and so on The normative approach is based on an ideal view of journalism as accurately and responsibly informing the public One defines journalism by considering the best examples of journalism and the practices of the best journalists A writer who has these skills and these ethical commitments is capable of publishing good well crafted well researched and ethically responsible journalism Persons who do not meet these normative requirements may call themselves journalists but they are not considered journalists from this normative perspective They are at irresponsible second rate or incompetent writers seeking to be journalists or pretending to be journalists Anonymity Anonymity is accepted more readily online than in mainstream news media Newspapers usually require the writers of letters to the editor to identify themselves Codes of mainstream media ethics caution journalists to use anonymous sources sparingly and only if certain rules are followed The codes warn journalists that people may use anonymity to take unfair or untrue potshots at other people for self interested reasons Online many commentary and chat areas do not require anonymity Online users resist demands from web site and blogs to register and identify themselves Anonymity is praised as allowing freedom of speech and sometimes helping to expose wrong doing Critics say it encourages irresponsible and harmful comments Mainstream media contradict themselves when they allow anonymity online but refuse anonymity in their newspapers and broadcast programs The ethical question is When is anonymity ethically permissible and is it inconsistent for media to enforce different rules on anonymity for different media platforms What should be the ethical guidelines for anonymity offline and online Speed rumor and corrections Reports and images circulate the globe with amazing speed via Twitter YouTube Facebook blogs cell phones and email Speed puts pressure on newsrooms to publish stories before they are adequately checked and verified as to the source of the story and the reliability of the alleged facts Major news organizations too often pick up rumors online Sometimes the impact of publishing an online rumor is not world shaking a false report that a hockey coach has been fired But a media that thrives on speed and sharing creates the potential for great harm For instance news organizations might be tempted to repeat a false rumor that terrorists had taken control of the London underground or that a nuclear power plant had just experienced a meltdown and dangerous gases were blowing towards Chicago These false reports could induce panic causes accidents prompt military action and so on A related problem created by new media is how to handle errors and corrections when reports and commentary are constantly being updated Increasingly journalists are blogging live about sports games news events and breaking stories Inevitably when one works at this speed errors are made from misspelling words to making factual errors Should news organizations go back and correct all of these mistakes which populate mountains of material Or should they correct errors later and not leave a trace of the original mistake what is called unpublishing The ethical challenge is to articulate guidelines for dealing with rumors and corrections in an online world that are consistent with the principles of accuracy verification and transparency Impartiality conflicts of interest and partisan journalism New media encourages people to express their opinion and share their thoughts candidly Many bloggers take pride in speaking their mind compared to any mainstream reporters who must cover events impartially Many online journalists see themselves as partisans or activists for causes or political movements and reject the idea of objective or neutral analysis Partial or partisan journalism comes in at least two kinds One kind is an opinion journalism that enjoys commenting upon events and issues with or without verification Another form is partisan journalism which uses media as a mouthpiece for political parties and movements To some extent we are seeing a revival or return to an opinion partisan journalism that was popular before the rise of objective reporting in the early 1900s Both opinion and partisan journalism have long roots in journalism history However their revival in an online world raises serious ethical conundrums for current media ethics Should objectivity be abandoned by all journalists Which is best for a vigorous and healthy democracy impartial journalism or partisan journalism To make matters more contentious some of the new exponents of opinion and impartial journalism not only question objectivity they question the long standing principle that

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/digital-media-ethics/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Global Media Ethics | Center for Journalism Ethics
    serve from factions to specific social classes to the public of nations The journalistic principle of serving the public interest has been understood tacitly or explicitly as serving one s own public social class or nation The other principles of objectivity impartiality and editorial independence were limited by this parochial understanding of who journalism serves For example impartiality meant being impartial in one s coverage of rival groups within one s society but not necessarily being impartial to groups outside one s national boundaries Global journalism ethics then can be seen as an extension of journalism ethics to regard journalism s public as the citizens of the world and to interpret the ethical principles of objectivity balance and independence in an international manner Journalism ethics becomes more cosmopolitan in tone and perspective top Components of global media ethics The development of global journalism ethics has the following tasks Conceptual tasks New philosophical foundations for a global ethics which include global re interpretation of the ethical role and aims of journalism global re interpretation of existing journalism principles and standards such as objectivity balance and independence construction of new norms and best practices as guides for the practice of global journalism Research tasks More research into the state of journalism amid globalization studies of news media in various regions of world studies on the evolution and impact of globalization in news media with a focus on ownership technology and practice studies on the ethical standards of new media in different countries studies on news coverage of international problems and issues Practical tasks Actions to implement and support global standards application of this global perspective to re define the coverage of international events and issues coalition building among journalists and interested parties with the aim of writing a global code of ethics that has wide spread acceptance initiatives to defend and enhance free and responsible news media especially in areas where problems are the greatest top How would a global ethics be different Philosophically the distinct conceptual element of a global ethics can be summarized by three imperatives 1 Act as global agents Journalists should see themselves as agents of a global public sphere The goal of their collective actions is a well informed diverse and tolerant global info sphere that challenges the distortions of tyrants the abuse of human rights and the manipulation of information by special interests 2 Serve the citizens of the world The global journalist s primary loyalty is to the information needs of world citizens Journalists should refuse to define themselves as attached primarily to factions regions or even countries Serving the public means serving more than one s local readership or audience or even the public of one s country 3 Promote non parochial understandings The global journalist frames issues broadly and uses a diversity of sources and perspectives to promote a nuanced understanding of issues from an international perspective Journalism should work against a narrow ethnocentrism or patriotism What do these three imperatives imply for

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/global-media-ethics/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New Publications | Center for Journalism Ethics
    Wasserman TABLOID JOURNALISM IN SOUTH AFRICA PDF 422 kb June 2010 240 pages Herman Wasserman examines the success of tabloid journalism in South Africa at a time when global print media are in decline He considers the social significance of the tabloids and how they play a role in integrating readers and their daily struggles with the political and social sphere of the new democracy Stephen J A Ward GLOBAL JOURNALISM ETHICS New media has caused drastic changes in the reporting of current events and shattered the old boundaries of region nation and traditional deadlines While journalists have quickly adapted to a world where a story is instantaneously accessible across the globe a new code of ethics to deal with reporting to a globalized world is beginning to emerge Reformulating the basic aims and principles of journalism Global Journalism Ethics offers a systematic philosophy for this new era of reporting news in a technologically connected age where stories and ethics cross borders Stephen J A Ward Herman Wasserman MEDIA ETHICS BEYOND BORDERS PDF 1 85 MB April 2010 192 pages Media Ethics Beyond Borders explores the construction of an ethics for news media that is global in reach and impact Essays by international media ethicists provide leading theoretical perspectives on major issues and applies the ideas to specific countries contexts and problems John H McManus DETECTING BULL How to Identify Bias and Junk Journalism in Print Broadcast and on the Wild Web 2009 272 pages and on DVD Detecting Bull exposes the biases of both audiences and journalists helping us notice how we interpret the world as well as how media do It lays open the fundamental conflict of interest all news providers face between maximizing audience and servicing advertisers on the one hand and on the other providing a

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/new-publications/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Resources | Center for Journalism Ethics
    Award Anthony Shadid The Truths We Tell Shadid Ethics Award Panel of Judges A Tribute to Anthony Shadid Resources Donate Resources Ethics in a Nutshell provides an overview of ethics and journalism ethics It identifies the major approaches to ethics and models of ethical reasoning The nature of ethics range of ethics theoretical and applied ethics and types of theories are discussed Holding Media Accountable contains links to press and broadcast councils ombudsmen and other media entities where you can register a complaint or express concerns Digital Media Ethics deals with the distinct ethical problems practices and norms of digital news media Digital news media includes online journalism blogging digital photojournalism citizen journalism and social media It includes questions about how professional journalism should use this new media to research and publish stories as well as how to use text or images provided by citizens Global Media Ethics addresses development of a comprehensive set of principles and standards for the practice of journalism in an age of global news media New forms of communication are reshaping the practice of a once parochial craft serving a local regional or national public External Resources APME Statement of ethical principles Associated Press Managing Editors ASBPE Ethics News Updates American Society of Business Publication Editors ASME Editorial Guidelines American Society of Magazine Editors updates 9 2013 ASNE Ethics codes American Society of Newspaper Editors BBC Editorial Guidelines British Broadcasting System CAJ Ethical Guidelines Canadian Association of Journalists CPB Ethics Guide for Public Radio Journalists Corporation for Public Broadcasting EthicNet s Collection of codes of journalism ethics in Europe IFJ Principles on the Conduct of Journalists International Federation for Journalists MCAE Improving Public Dialogue Media and Citizen Responsibilities Markkula Center for Applied Ethics Media Ethics PDF U S Department of State NPPA Code of Ethics

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive

  • About Us | Center for Journalism Ethics
    the Anthony Shadid Award Anthony Shadid The Truths We Tell Shadid Ethics Award Panel of Judges A Tribute to Anthony Shadid Resources Donate About Us Our Aim This website is your source for tracking and analyzing ethical issues in your city or around the world This site is the public face of the new Center for Journalism Ethics in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin Madison This site will keep you updated on ethical issues in the news while providing informed analysis on issues as well as book reviews and interviews with leading figures in journalism You will access a host of resources from background discussions on the nature and history of journalism ethics to codes of practice and links to ethics experts The aim of the site is to support the mission of the Center for Journalism Ethics to advance the ethical standards and practices of democratic journalism through discussion research teaching professional outreach and newsroom partnerships The center is a voice for journalistic integrity a forum for informed debate and an incubator for new ideas and practices Approach Our approach to journalism ethics is practical and interdisciplinary Journalism ethics is a branch

    Original URL path: http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/about/ (2014-10-31)
    Open archived version from archive



  •