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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    script West District Findings see also West District West District Recommendations Findings by Attribute Total Green Space Open Space Natural Areas Community Gardens Pedestrian Orientation Transit Orientation Street Trees Residential Impervious Cover Non Residential Impervious Cover About Send feedback Print

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_1_find (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    community gardens there is still a deficit of 21 sites in meeting the standard of one garden per 2 000 residents This deficit is the largest of all six districts Natural Areas The natural areas performance standard of 25 acres per 25 000 residents is applied at the city level rather than the district level and two additional sites are needed in Madison to meet this standard The West district s existing patches of natural space show the most promise for providing one of these sites The West currently has several patches of natural areas of 25 acres or larger and at least one additional site that could be expanded to 25 acres As a whole the district has over twice as much forested area than any other district but on a per capita basis it ranks second to the South district Climate Change In the West district tree canopy covers 87 of the street network the highest percentage in the City The district still faces a 13 deficit in meeting the 100 standard A portion of the streets lacking trees are within agricultural areas and it can be expected that if these areas are developed street trees will be planted Only 68 of the West district s parcels have sidewalks one of the smallest percentages in the Madison This finding is consistent with a general trend of less sidewalk coverage in areas with lower population density the East is the other district with a small percentage of sidewalk coverage in contrast to the Isthmus district at nearly 100 Although parts of the West district do not qualify for transit service in terms of their population density 90 of the area that does qualify is currently served This level of service is about average for Madison it is lower than

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_1_rec (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    West District Findings see also Near West District Near West District Recommendations Findings by Attribute Total Green Space Open Space Natural Areas Community Gardens Pedestrian Orientation Transit Orientation Street Trees Residential Impervious Cover Non Residential Impervious Cover About Send feedback

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_2_find (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    has been designated as a conservation park Because it was one of the earliest sections of Madison to develop the prospects of creating a conservation park in the district are quite low The Near West s natural areas place it fifth out of the six districts ahead of the Isthmus Of the 408 acres 387 are forested and 281 acres out of these 387 are public The largest forested areas are the University s Picnic Point area and land owned by the City adjacent to the Glenway Golf Course Climate Change Eighty six percent of the Near West s streets have trees second only to the West s 87 the performance standard for this attribute is 100 coverage Several of the major streets in the Near West District lack street tree coverage a deficiency that impacts local climate stormwater and the aesthetic quality of the district Portions of University Avenue Highland Avenue Speedway Road and Mineral Point Road are streets on which the tree deficit can be addressed Science Drive in University Research Park and several streets running through the University campus are also currently without trees Pedestrian friendliness and access to transit are important to the climate goal About 82 of the Near West district has residential sidewalks behind only the Isthmus district which has 99 sidewalk coverage The standard of providing 95 of residential parcels with sidewalks is a reasonable target for the Near West which needs an increase of only 13 Ninety nine percent of the Near West s blocks are within 1 4 mile of a transit stop placing the district once again second only to the Isthmus While service might be adjusted slightly to increase transit use in the district the overall coverage service in the Near West is excellent Stormwater The Near West district

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_2_rec (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    the greatest amount of natural areas in any district in the city The district is home to 1 186 acres of conservation park lands primarily within the UW Arboretum also more than any other district With over 99 acres of public natural areas per 1 000 residents the South well exceeds national performance standards Climate Change In terms of the attributes affecting climate change presence of street trees and pedestrian and transit orientation the South district is lacking With only 49 of the district s streets having adequate street trees the South district is far from meeting the performance standard of 100 street tree coverage The district s 51 street tree deficit is significantly higher than every other district all of which have well over 75 coverage Neighborhoods in the South district in need of street trees include Highland Manor Indian Springs Bay Creek Burr Oaks and portions of Moorland Rimrock Street trees are especially needed along Park Street Olin Road John Nolen Drive and Fish Hatchery Road as well Accessibility of transit to residential parcels and the presence of sidewalks encourage alternative modes of transportation and lessen the reliance on automobiles thereby decreasing the production of pollutants but the South district is deficient in both its transit and residential sidewalks Currently 88 of the South s residents have adequate transit access leaving the South a deficit of six bus stops In terms of pedestrian amenities the national performance standard is that 95 of residential parcels have sidewalks With only 81 of the district s residential parcels having adequate sidewalk coverage the South has a deficit of 19 which is on par with the rest of Madison except for the Isthmus which exceeds the standard Stormwater In terms of stormwater which is influenced by impervious coverage and street tree coverage

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_3_rec (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    rail lines and are among Madison s best examples of creative reuse of land resources At 1 10 of an acre the Reynolds garden is the smallest in the City but also serves residents the City s most densely populated area where space is at a premium The Isthmus currently provides only one community garden space for every 15 000 residents leaving the Isthmus a deficit of 19 gardens With open space as scarce as it is in the district the city will need to be open to alternative ways accessing gardening space for Isthmus residents in order to develop the 19 community garden sites needed to meet the desired standards Natural Areas The Isthmus has 22 acres of natural areas and forest fragments found within 6 patches the majority of which lie along the Yahara River in addition to Olbrich Gardens and Park and Orton Park Because the Isthmus is densely populated this amounts to less than ½ acre of natural areas for every 1 000 residents The Isthmus has the least amount of natural areas in the City by far and with the full and dense development characteristic of the district new sizable natural areas will not be developed and existing natural areas have very little room for expansion Climate Change Street trees are one way the Isthmus can improve both its stormwater management and reduce the urban heat island effect but it lacks 15 of the tree cover necessary to achieve the goal of 100 street tree coverage Compared to other districts in the city the Isthmus is average in this respect The majority of streets lacking adequate tree coverage are in one of two areas The central business district with dense developments of commercial office and residential spaces is often built out to the lot line leaving little to no room for tree plantings While some downtown streets may be planted others may require easements in order to permit planting along the public right of way The other area in the district most seriously lacking tree coverage is the commercial district east of the Yahara River where many arterials including Washington Winnebago Commercial and Fordem are lacking proper tree coverage Siting tree lawns along these areas and planting trees on the edges of large street fronting parking lots will help to remedy this problem Stormwater As the Isthmus is the most densely populated district in the city it is not surprising that it has the highest percentage of impervious cover with a combined residential and non residential impervious coverage comprising 1 369 acres or 52 of the district s area This is more than double every other district s total impervious coverage except the Near West side Yet based on performance standards for impervious coverage in relation to population density the Isthmus fares very well only 2 or 56 acres above the prescribed limits Further on a per capita basis the Isthmus actually has the fewest impervious parcels with just 30 parcels per 1 000 residents

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_4_rec (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    at the periphery of the district and are better situated to serve the needs of residents from other districts Furthermore according the standard of one site per 2 000 residents the district has a deficit of 8 community garden sites Consequently the North district should seek a broader coverage of garden sites that are located to serve district residents Natural Areas The North is one of three districts in Madison to have conservation areas Cherokee Marsh Conservation Park with a total of 130 acres provides an extensive natural area for the North district and is second in size only to the UW Arboretum Cherokee Marsh also connects to an area of privately owned forest together this uninterrupted patch of natural area currently protects important habitat and adds aesthetic value to the North district In addition to the Cherokee Marsh Conservation Park the North has 211 acres of publicly owned natural areas Climate Change The North district can address the threat of climate change and the urban heat island through additional street tree canopy Street trees assist in cooling the city through evapotranspiration and by blocking the sun from road surfaces that trap heat The North currently has street tree coverage for 78 of the district This is the second lowest percentage of street trees among Madison s districts Areas that would benefit from additional tree canopy coverage are areas west of the Wisconsin and Southern railroad line along Troy Drive and Green Avenue The commercial area and MATC campus just off Anderson Street could also benefit from additional street trees Other strategies for reaching Madison s climate change goals include increasing connectivity between areas with sidewalks and promoting alternative forms of transportation Currently the North s residential areas have 76 sidewalk coverage Though sidewalks add to impervious coverage see stormwater section they promote pedestrian circulation In addition to sidewalk connectivity 93 of the North district s census blocks are located within ¼ mile of a transit stop Only the Isthmus and Near West have higher service percentages Together sidewalk connectivity and transit service prompt residents to travel by foot or bus thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions and water pollution Stormwater Several large industrial and commercial parks coupled with the Dane County Regional Airport add a significant amount of impervious coverage to Madison s North district Impervious areas cover nearly 25 of the district s total area with parking lots making up 10 of the district s area Unfortunately only 69 of the total 919 acres of parking lots are on public lands likewise only 120 of the total 2 248 acres of impervious area are publicly held Therefore reducing impervious coverage in the North district requires active participation from residents and community businesses The district s impervious coverage comes mainly from commercial parcels which constitute 16 of the district s area by contrast residential impervious coverage accounts for 3 of the district s area Only Madison s downtown districts the Isthmus and the Near West exceed the North s percentage

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_5_rec (2014-11-22)
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  • EcoPlanIT Madison
    for the district to exceed national standards Though the East district does not need to increase its open space it should develop strategies to maintain current levels of open space as the district continues to develop along the periphery In stark contrast to the amount of open space the East is the only district with no community gardens The standard for community gardens is one site per 2 000 residents Based on this standard the East district needs to develop 15 community gardens sites Because of its wealth of open space the East district has several parcels that can be used for community gardens Natural Areas With 462 acres natural areas including Edna Taylor Conservation Park and Hiestand Conservation Park account for only 4 of the East district s total area Compared to other low density districts such as the West and South districts this percentage is extremely low The percentage of land comprised by natural areas in the East district is only marginally higher than in the Isthmus district which has the densest development in the City The standard for natural areas is 25 acres per 25 000 residents at the municipal level Madison currently has six patches of natural areas that are 25 acres or greater Based on Madison s current population the City requires two more natural areas of similar size Because of the low density of the East district and its small proportion of natural areas we recommend that at least one natural area is developed in the East district Climate Change Proper tree planting reduces annual energy consumption and stormwater runoff thereby reducing air and water pollution Unfortunately the East district lacks sufficient tree canopy with street trees covering only 79 of the district Not only does it fall short of the standard tree canopy coverage in the East district is significantly lower than in many of Madison s districts The majority of streets without trees were found in the southern section of the East district such as streets in the East Buckeye neighborhood To meet the standard of 100 coverage the East district must plant additional trees along roads deficient in tree canopy Improving the quality of transit service and increasing pedestrian pathways also reduces air and water pollution When residents walk bike or use public transportation greenhouse gas emissions are lowered and fewer toxic substances make their way into our lakes and groundwater The East district was found to have deficiencies in both transit service and sidewalk coverage National standards for transit are based on the number of census blocks within ¼ mile of a transit stop ideally all census blocks will be within ¼ of a transit stop Compared to other districts the East district has the lowest transit coverage with only 86 of residents living within ¼ mile of a transit stop The East district likewise fell short of the standard for sidewalk coverage While the national standard requires that 95 of residential streets have sidewalk coverage sidewalks were found to

    Original URL path: http://urpl.wisc.edu/ecoplan/index.php?page=district_6_rec (2014-11-22)
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