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  • Western Libraries
    Services Check out laptops Community Members Borrowing Copyright Practice Interlibrary Loan ILLiad Library Instruction Library Tours Renew materials Access your records Room Booking System Course Reserves Students Staff Faculty Borrowing Information For Community Extended Ed Students Faculty Grad Students Transfer Students Patrons with Disabilities Learning Commons Partners Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library Carmen Werder Creating an effective writing assignment involves more than setting a word count and picking a due date Assignments that are clearly stated and relevant to the course curriculum enhance student learning and bolster the writing process Below are a few guidelines to help develop effective writing assignments Design Make assignment expectations clear and explicit Write out the assignment with title keeping it to one page whenever possible See Assignment Form for one format and to use as a worksheet Suggest possible topics allowing students some options and state as questions when possible State the purpose as an authentic objective such as to explain or to describe Indicate an audience real or hypothetical beyond the teacher Recommend a process by breaking down the assignment into a series of tasks being sure to include informal

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_guidelines (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    Connect With Us Explore Resources Graduate Students Faculty Teaching Learning Credit Courses Learning Commons LIT Library Information Tutorial Library Guides Citation Guides and Style Manuals Course Guides How To Guides Plagiarism Policies Guidelines Subject Guides LIBRARIES COLLECTIONS Heritage Resources Heritage Resources Home Center for Pacific Northwest Studies Special Collections University Archives Records Center Libraries Music Library Whatcom Libraries One Card Program Bellingham Public Library Other Libraries Collections Audio Collection Children s Literature Collection Digital Collections Government Information Map Collection Microform Collections Mongolian Studies New Items at Western Libraries Non Library Collections Northwest Collection PoetryCHaT Video Collection Western CEDAR SERVICES Key Services Check out laptops Community Members Borrowing Copyright Practice Interlibrary Loan ILLiad Library Instruction Library Tours Renew materials Access your records Room Booking System Course Reserves Students Staff Faculty Borrowing Information For Community Extended Ed Students Faculty Grad Students Transfer Students Patrons with Disabilities Learning Commons Partners Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library TITLE What is the name of the assignment TOPIC What kinds of topics questions problems do you recommend PURPOSE What should the writing accomplish AUDIENCE Who is the reader PROCESS What tasks will help accomplish

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_writing_assignment_form (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library Write with students Doing the exploratory writing along with students keeps the instructor informed about the tasks assigned opens up the instructor to discovering new ideas and sends the message that this writing is worth doing Writing in the company of students also demystifies it and models writing as a challenging ongoing process of meaning making Create incentives for doing informal writing other than grades Integrate exploratory writing tasks into the normal routine and ongoing projects of a class so that the writing serves to further discussion and understanding rather than as something separate and unrelated For example using a question from a previous quick write on an essay exam conveys the value of the thinking done in the exploratory piece Explain the purpose of writing to learn to students before assigning it Anticipate the fact that some students will see informal writing as busy work by telling them that the purpose of this kind of writing is to think on paper rather than to display their already carefully thought out ideas Advise that you will not be paying attention to organization and editing but rather to the quality and depth of their thinking Also emphasize that the informal writing will give you information about which ideas to review extend that it s for your benefit too Explain the writing task in terms of time or length requirements Some instructors say Write for 2 3 minutes while others say Write one full single spaced page of 12 point font Even though the purpose of this kind of writing is the informal exploration of ideas the assignment still needs to be specific and clearly outlined For extended kinds of exploratory writing such as journals or notebooks provide models Giving students a range of models of other students informal writing including effective and less effective samples demonstrates what you are looking for in a way that simple instructions alone can not Make the writing to learn count for evaluation purposes Since the emphasis of writing to learn is on practicing thinking instructors should avoid grading it on a regular basis However it should have some value in the overall grading scheme Some instructors assign it a percentage of the overall course grade and then score selected pieces with either a check plus minus scale

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_guidelines_wtl (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    Library Tours Renew materials Access your records Room Booking System Course Reserves Students Staff Faculty Borrowing Information For Community Extended Ed Students Faculty Grad Students Transfer Students Patrons with Disabilities Learning Commons Partners Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library QHQ Question Hypothesis Question Assumptions Good critical thinking and good clear writing involves a process of making finer and finer distinctions a process of posing and answering more refined questions a process of questioning and hypothesizing Procedure 1 Question Ask students to generate write down a question they have about a text a lecture or lab a class discussion an experiment any kind of problematic situation 2 Hypothesize Ask them to continue writing for x number of minutes x amount of space working to answer the question they have posed The idea is to try out as many answers as possible and to come to some sense of a best possible answer explaining why this hypothesis makes sense 3 Question Ask students to read through what they have written and then write down a new question that emerges out of what they have already written Repeat laps of QHQ

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_writing_as_thinking (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library One Format Note I use the term reader response rather than peer review peer evaluation for at least two reasons I want students to view themselves as writers a perspective that implies a relationship with others as readers Also I use these cycles primarily as opportunities for writers to get response from colleagues about their work in progress rather than to judge one another s final work what the expression using peer suggest In groups of three CYCLE 1 30 45 minutes 10 15 minutes per draft Writers read aloud while others listen and follow along on draft copy Writers take notes while others give oral feedback to each draft in answer to the following questions In a sentence or two how would you sum up the writer s main claim in this draft After reading this draft what are the main unanswered questions remaining for you as a reader How would getting these questions answered help you What part of this draft is clearest most effective interesting for you as a reader Why What part of this draft could be strengthened What specific suggestions can you offer for revising it Writer s Question Only ONE question will be addressed check the main one How might I strengthen my focus

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_reader_response_cycles (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    LIT Library Information Tutorial Library Guides Citation Guides and Style Manuals Course Guides How To Guides Plagiarism Policies Guidelines Subject Guides LIBRARIES COLLECTIONS Heritage Resources Heritage Resources Home Center for Pacific Northwest Studies Special Collections University Archives Records Center Libraries Music Library Whatcom Libraries One Card Program Bellingham Public Library Other Libraries Collections Audio Collection Children s Literature Collection Digital Collections Government Information Map Collection Microform Collections Mongolian Studies New Items at Western Libraries Non Library Collections Northwest Collection PoetryCHaT Video Collection Western CEDAR SERVICES Key Services Check out laptops Community Members Borrowing Copyright Practice Interlibrary Loan ILLiad Library Instruction Library Tours Renew materials Access your records Room Booking System Course Reserves Students Staff Faculty Borrowing Information For Community Extended Ed Students Faculty Grad Students Transfer Students Patrons with Disabilities Learning Commons Partners Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library Name Draft Title Date 1 What overall thesis idea does this draft present 2 What part of this draft is clearest most effective to you as a reader Why 3 Writer s Question Only ONE question will be addressed check the main one How might I strengthen my thesis

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_reader_response_form (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    truth Critical Reasoning Able to learn in community benefits from shared learning writing experiences cohort settings Composing Process Anything missing Concern with disciplinary rules expert follows them automatically Conventions Affective thinking valuing empathy and passion as well as cognitive thinking not on Expectations sheet See all workshop notes Evaluating Writing DIFFICULTY WAYS TO ADDRESS DIFFICULTY Subjectivity of grading Model a range of work alternative models Provide a model you have already responded to with your gloss Incorporate meta commenting into assessment process give reasoning for criteria demonstrate your process of reading Fraught place of grades in students lives Include some informally graded or ungraded assignments Separate feedback from the grade and deliver separately Encourage students to value something besides the grade choice of topic awareness of how assignment is important to the discipline Create authentic writing assignments that represent writing within the discipline outside of academia Equation between grade self worth Provide clear rubrics and feedback Focus feedback on the writing product not the writer Separating growth from true writing proficiency Use portfolios that document progress over time Ask students to explain what they aimed for what they ended up with and what they will do next time Not knowing all criteria for success Admit the challenge to students Provide clear rubrics including specific criteria Develop a collective rubric grading criteria as a class Model successful unsuccessful writing to accompany rubric Ask for student feedback on evaluation criteria Lack of models or fear that models will constrain students Provide multiple models that show a range of performance Talk about why models are successful unsuccessful Not knowing how to teach what students need to know Participate in writing instruction support activities Inability of students to hear what evaluation says Separate grades from written comments feedback Incorporate drafts into the curriculum teach instruct before judging writing Provide methods for students self assessment of strengths goals and needs Discuss evaluation process and rationale in face to face meetings with students Ask students to mirror feedback verify their perceptions Time constraints for revising Limit the number of assignments Limit the length or scope of assignments Time constraints for reading and grading Prioritize what should be graded Limit the number or length of assignments Evaluating group collaborative writing Invite collaborative work during process but evaluate only the individual efforts If doing collective products ask individuals to identify and compose certain sections Addressing preconceived notions about students abilities Use blind anonymous reading Use low stakes ungraded writing without names and respond to the ideas presented See all workshop notes Responding to Student Writing Some Promising Response Practices Ask for students to name one or two issues they want response to Survey students to determine what kind of feedback is most effective for them Explain your process of reading model effective responding in class Link feedback to the writing task purpose the criteria and the writing process Use feedback as a tool to help students become aware of their hot spots and develop resources to deal with

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_bbd_notes (2016-02-01)
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  • Western Libraries
    Check out laptops Community Members Borrowing Copyright Practice Interlibrary Loan ILLiad Library Instruction Library Tours Renew materials Access your records Room Booking System Course Reserves Students Staff Faculty Borrowing Information For Community Extended Ed Students Faculty Grad Students Transfer Students Patrons with Disabilities Learning Commons Partners Learning Commons Home Center for Instructional Innovation and Assessment Center for Service Learning Research Writing Studio Student Technology Center Teaching Learning Academy Tutoring Center Writing Instruction Support Social Sites and Mobile Apps Facebook Flickr Twitter YouTube Heritage Resources Tumblr Mobile Ask Us EBSCO ABOUT THE LIBRARY About the Staff News from the Dean Organizational Chart People Departments Contact Us Creative and Scholarly Works About the Organization Library Budgets Planning Assessment FAQ Sustainable Access to Scholarly Resources Diversity at Western Libraries General Information Art Displays Exhibits Code of Conduct Events Calendar Event Request Form Library Hours Library News Library 3 Things Newsletter Getting Help Getting here maps and parking Make a Gift to the Libraries Map of the library Discipline based Writing Rubric CONTENT strong accep weak not accep How appropriate is the topic in terms of the assignment How evident is the purpose for writing To what extent is the evidence information Relevant Accurate Necessary Complete REASONING strong accept weak not accep How significant are the claims ideas purpose what is the quality of the evidence How sufficient is the context provided What what extent are assumptions recognized and made explicit To what extent does the interpretation and analysis of evidence information visuals show Depth of thinking Logical reasoning Complex reasoning Accurate conclusions Informed recommendations ORGANIZATION strong accep weak not accep How well does the overall organization capture the designated purpose To what extent does the ordering of information evidence lead the reader through the text e g signposts transitions headings bullets How well

    Original URL path: http://www.library.wwu.edu/wis_writing_rubric (2016-02-01)
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